Category Archives: Dead Sea Scrolls

2020: The Carnival

In the past, Carnivals have been ‘uneven’ or even perhaps ‘nearly non existent’.  But 2020 is a new year and kicks off with The Carnival to Beat All Carnivals.  Titled simply 2020: The Carnival, it serves as the template for all the Carnivals to come this year:  Fully stocked, cleverly curated, and vividly presented.

Carnival attendees will not have to suffer entries that consist merely of a link and a two word descriptor.  Gone are the days of hum-druminess, dear friends.  Rejoice and be exceedingly glad!

Let’s visit the attractions from January and start off this new year of Carnivals right now!*

Hebrew Bible and Ancient Near East

Jan Assmann has a very intriguing essay in The Torah dot Com about the blackening of Egypt’s image through the tale of the Exodus.  It’s a great read to start off the Carnival.

Are you a bit odd?  Do you enjoy really obscure, odd things in the Masoretic Text?  Things like accent marks? Then, my friends, have I got the post for you.  Enjoy.

Roberta Mazza has some news about Brill’s publication of some Museum of the Bible unprovenanced artifacts.  Give it a read if you haven’t already.

Phil *The Exterminator* Long takes a look at the ‘main themes of Daniel.’  Mainly.  And gets taken to the woodshed for his suggestion that Daniel’s statue was an obelisk.

What’s that?  File footage of Dead Sea Scrolls stuff from the early days ya say?  Well who wouldn’t want to see that?

Otherwise, the HB/ OT people must have had January off.  Lucky devils.

New Testament and Early Christianity

Phil Long offered some interesting observations on 1 John.  On several occasions. Take a gander.  There was an interesting podcast (I know, I know…) interview with Deb Saxon about heresy and in particular heretical women that appeared early in the month.

Can we trust the text of the New Testament?  Dan Wallace and Bart Ehrman debate the question.

They’re already issuing calls for papers for sessions at SBL.  Here’s one for the text critics.

The Call for Papers for SBL Annual Meeting in Boston (21–24 November) is now open until 11 March. This year we will focus on the ECM of the Gospel of Mark which will be published soon (hooray!).

Robert has a brief look at the diversity among the 12.  Give it a read.  And Brent announces that there’s a new edition of the Freer Codex.  But it isn’t free.  It’s yours for a mere $100.

Leave it to Rick *The Papyrinator* Brannan to find out some obscure this or that about some New Testament personage from some obscure and relatively unknown papyrus.  This time it’s about Miriam’s Tambourine.  Whatever, dude.  What.  Ever.

Peter Gurry has a nice essay-let on the KJV and a passage in Matthew and versification.  He posted it on twitter too in 2023 separate tweets so be glad he collected it all in one place here so as to spare you the scrolling of a thousand scrolls.

Mike Bird wonders if it’s possible to put into play today the so called ‘Haustafeln’ from the NT epistles.  I say sure, why not.  I’m game.  I also would like to see other bits of the Bible taken seriously.  Alas, those days are past now for most Christians (who have zero interest in doing anything remotely related to biblical ideas).  Mike also wondered how theological New Testament theology is.  I sense a new book in the works…

How do NA 28 and THGNT compare?  Well naturally the TC geekers have been on the question and come to some interesting conclusions.

The CSNTM is very keen to get you to read a book about Myths and Manuscripts.  In fact, if you don’t read the book in question, they’re going to send someone to your house and they will say ‘Ni’ to you from behind bushes until you do!

Nyasha Junior and Sarah Bond have a very good entry on how one of the Magi became Black.  Or, in the words of their thesis- The story behind the rise and decline of the popularity of the black magus during the Renaissance has been largely forgotten, but at one time, the tale was used to explain the perceived need for conversion to Christianity, the three ages of man, as well as emerging theories of race.

There’s also this post about Sappho.  Some text something or other found on some day in 2012 and there seems to be a debate about it.  It’s connected to the Museum of the Bible… so, there’s that disclaimer.  Sappho-ites, enjoy it.

The low point of the month came when word arrived that J. Ramsey Michaels had died on the 18th.  That news took 9 days to seep out.  Obviously Michaels wasn’t ‘famous’ enough for the world to hear of his passing instantly.  But he mattered more than any celebrity ever has.  Rest in peace, good sir.

Archaeology

Todd Bolen posted this in the waning hours of 2019 but I’m going to include it in spite of the fact that it wasn’t technically posted in January.  It’s still worth a look.  It’s what he calls the top 10 discoveries in 2019.

The ‘figural world of Judah’ is the topic of this lecture at the Ecole Biblique in Jerusalem.  Posted here.

Interested in olive farming in the ANE?  Well then this is the post for you.

How do archaeologists decide on dating a find?  Israel Finkelstein answers that question in this interesting interview.  Watch it.  And also watch Israel and Thomas in a YouTube video about their archaeological escapades.

Roberta Mazza has a not to be missed post on the ongoing Obbink scandal.  Do give it a thorough read.

ETC has a piece on the bedouin who discovered the Dead Sea Scrolls.  It’s a sort of ‘thanks, guys’ piece.  And speaking of the Scrolls, Andrew Perrin has a post about them and fakes and frauds and such.  Give it a look, for sure.

Don’t miss this essay, buried under a mountain of internetness, about the perennial problem with the excavation of ancient sites, unprovenanced junk, and related matters.

And finally, ANE Today hits another one out of the ballpark with this exceptionally well written essay on the alphabet.  There are other Archaeology magazines out there but they pale in comparison to ANE Today and, to be quite straightforward, they have more interest in fluff and self promotion than they do in facts and science.  Save your money, don’t waste it on substandard magazines, and instead use your time wisely and read ANE Today.

Books

Pick up your free book from Logos!  And read Mike Bird’s review of ‘Pagans and Christians in the City‘.  Mike says

This is definitely one of the more interesting books I’ve read of late.

That’s not the whole review.  There’s more.  There’s more to, to Brian Leport’s review of a book called Gospels Before the Book.  Mark Baker reviewed ‘Paul and the Giants of Philosophy‘- for those of you are into all that Paul stuff.  John is better.  (The Johannine Literature is far more engaging and enthralling.  Admit it.  Or be wrong.  Up to you.)

Prof Stuckenbruck pointed out the publication of a thing.  Some of you will be interested in that thing and some of you won’t.  But you won’t know if the thing is of interest until you look at the thing.

Paul Moldovan (is that his real name???) reviewed (briefly) Doug Harink’s commentary on 1-2 Peter.

I enjoyed the author’s short treatment of Satan in Peter’s epistle (1 Peter 5:8: “Be alert and of sober mind: your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour”). Harink finds that Satan is on the constant prowl against God’s people–the local community of faith–to disrupt its shalom.

Chris Tilling constantly disrupts my shalom.  That makes him Satan, right?

Tim Mitchell, a student (and helicopter mechanic), has written a book review for JETS and he’s posted it on his blog too.  The book is Larsen’s ‘Gospels Before the Book’.  Here’s the sentence that stood out-

Though most of the work remains unconvincing, there are one or two aspects of Gospels Before the Book that might commend it to those who lack knowledge of ancient publication.

Oh boy…  Now that’s funny.  Here’s what Leonard Greenspoon thinks of the volume-

“[an] elegantly written volume … An invaluable resource for those seeking a clearer understanding of ancient literature, including (but by no means limited to) religious texts … Highly recommended.” — L. J. Greenspoon

So, whose word on the work will you take for ‘gospel’.  A beginner’s or an expert’s?  Read Mitchell’s entire review and I think your decision will be very easy…

This young fella named Matt Cover (if that’s really his name) reviewed the Lexham English Septuagint.  He writes

I highly recommend Lexham’s LES! This resource will allow Christians to see the translation that many in the early church used.

I had NO idea that many in the early Church read the Lexham English Septuagint!  There’s other stuff to learn from the review too!

Richard Hess also reviewed the Lexham English translation of the LXX.  He misses out though and doesn’t call it the ‘translation that many in the early Church used’…

An anonymous, unnamed blogger calling herself the ‘Christian Classicist’ reviewed Jongkind’s introduction to the Tyndale Greek New Testament.  [I searched high and low on the blog for some name, but alas…]

Bob Cornwall reviewed a commentary on Mark.  Review his review for yourself, here.

Chris Tilling took a moment to blog in January.  Just a moment though, and then he returned to cheese.  His first and greatest love.  He wrote, in part

I am delighted to hear of Prof. Rainer Riesner’s forthcoming book, Messias Jesus, for which more information can be found here.

Oh boy!

Scot McKnight reviewed Nijay Gupta’s book on… wait for it… Paul, in a post titled ‘Gotta Have Faith, But What is Faith?’  And the revolutionary conclusion?  ‘Faith’ means different things in different contexts!  Who knew….  [I don’t mean to sound snarky, but when will enough books about Paul be enough?  What can possibly be said that hasn’t already been said by someone somewhere?  I beg you NT people, pick something else to write about besides Paul.  He’s tedious and boring and no one liked him and we know that because no one ever went with him on more than one mission. Even Luke got sick of him.  Move on, friends, to something else.  There’s a whole Bible to think about.]

Jimmy Roh reviewed the T&T Clark Encyclopedia of Second Temple Judaism.  Ruh Roh….  (get it?)

Hebrew Discourse analysis.  Nuff said…

The discipline of discourse analysis is applied to Biblical Hebrew in Zondervan’s recent syntax, Basics of Hebrew Discourse.

Conferences

The Society for Old Testament Study met at the University of Nottingham in January.  You can see what happened there at the hashtag #SOTS2020.  It’s one of the best conferences around.  If you are into the Hebrew Bible, you should most certainly consider applying for membership.  You’ll need proficiency in Biblical Hebrew and two sponsors who are active members.

Origen as Philologist will be held in Phoenix in November.  Sign up now or you may be cut off…

The Museum of the Bible (yes, that MOTB) is hosting a conference in June on textual criticism and related sorts of stuff.  It’s aimed at grad students and other gullible sorts.  Do attend if you are inclined that-way-wards.

Interested in the LXX?  Well then get thee to WuppertalThe 2020 event will be the eighth such conference, and will take place from Friday, July 24th through Monday, July 27th.

I posted a pretty good sampling of events at SOTS Winter Meeting 2020.  Here’s the link. And of course you can see what others had to say about the meeting at the twitter hashtag #SOTS2020.

The Newman Conference which focused on ‘The God Who Speaks’ was a fantastic event with amazing sessions.  2020 is the ‘Year of the Bible’ and this event was the launch of that celebration in the United Kingdom.

Will Ross issued a call for papers for the Linguistics and the Biblical Text Conference.  Don’t confuse this useful conference for the one Chris Tilling announced titled ‘Linguini and How it Changed My Pasta, Present, and Future.’

Tweets and Tweeters

One of the twitter folk you should follow is David Creech.   He tweeted this on 1 January

@DyingSparrows — On the eighth day after his birth Jesus was circumcised. 1,300 years later St. Catherine of Siena would be given his holy foreskin as a wedding ring (she had small fingers or it was super elastic). Y’all should study religion more.

‘Nuff said, right?

Peter Gurry tweeted this mysterious bitlet-

@pjgurry – So, it seems that @ivpacademic has recently changed their review copy policy for the worse but @BakerAcademic just changed theirs for the better.

What’s he mean?? As a big fan of books, I need to know the back story. Tease-tweeting needs an explanation, people!

Looking for a job? This tweet’s for you: @nt4ox – Asst Prof in Theology (field of specialization open), St Catherine University (St Paul/Minneapolis). FT/TT. Deadline Feb 15.

Looking for a conference? Oxford NT tweeted this:

@nt4ox — Oxford day conference “Martyrdom on the Margins” (JW van Henten, E Castelli, M Edwards, C Sahner et al), 20 February. Registration (free) required, Deadline 3 Feb. ow.ly/QcqI50xXVcV

Think that apocryphal materials are no longer appearing? Think again, my friends, for what is more apocryphal than this tweet?

@TBurkeApoc — This seems to be the first significant effort to incorporate a large mum eat of MSS into an edition, right?

‘Large mum eat’ huh? Apocryphal to the max.  Follow Tony.  He’s great fun.  And very informative!

I saw this and liked it and think you will too-

@laurajeantruman – Therefore I will put up with this Church until I see a better one; and it will have to put up with me, until I become better. Erasmus

Laura Robinson had a great thread on the malleability of the ‘end time signs’ people.  I posted it here (having collected the thread into one post).

Chip Hardy, @drchiphardy, tweeted news of a ‘Ninth-century Inscription bearing a Yahwistic name found at Abel Beth Maacah’. Ha’aretz is less restrained, with its willfully exaggerated “Hebrew Inscription on a 3,000-year-old Jar Could Redraw Borders of Ancient Israel”. Papers have to exaggerate I suppose, which is why you should never believe a headline.

If you don’t think twitter has something to teach you, think again.  It holds ‘gems’ like this…

@ShammaBoyarin — You guys- I think this does not look good for the Democrats’ case: Parnas פרנס is 80+200+50+60=390 in gemateria. And so is Schiff שיף-
300+10+80=390

How can you not believe someone who calls ‘gematria’ ‘gemateria’????

From the Palestinian Exploration Fund, this tweet announcement-

@PalExFund – We are pleased to announce the first event to be held in our research centre in #Greenwich: a talk given by Dr. Salman Abu Sitta on “The Survey of Western #Palestine Revisited: The Visible and the Hidden” on Feb 26. Book by emailing collections@pef.org.uk.

By the by, I’ve put together a list of biblical scholars who tweet.  If you would kindly let me know if there are folk I missed and need to add to it, I would be grateful.

Miscellaneous

Scot McKnight has some things to say about ‘singleness‘.  You’ll want to give it a look.  Also, on the 21st, Scot’s blog moved to Christianity Today.  Here’s the new location.

But don’t despair, lovers of Patheos’s festooned with ads blogs, Nijay has moved his blog from wherever it was to Patheos! He tweeted-

@NijayKGupta — Here is the big news: My blog has moved to @PatheosEvang. Bookmark, b/c old site will be removed soon. Here is my first post, check it out.

Good news!  James Spinti is not an impostor!  Hooray!

Carmen Imes has been blogging for a decade and she’s posted her top 10 posts.  I have unbridled respect for people who can choose their favorite of anything.  My favorite things change by the day and by circumstances.

There’s a post-doc in biblical studies waiting for you at Wellesley College.  Details here.

Computer geeks and textual criticism geeks intermingle (like the sons of God and the daughters of men in Genesis 6) and what is born of that unholy union is something called the  Coherence-Based Genealogical Method (CBGM).  Interested?  Of course you are, because you’re weird.  So here’s the story.

An essay concerning the recording of classes appeared mid-month and the author, a law professor (of course) has a small list of reasons why he doesn’t like it.  He’s worried, among other things, about his students being digitally surveilled.  And he thinks it has a chilling effect on classroom discussion.  I guess lawyers are always afraid they might run for office and can’t ever risk saying something that might show up on Youtube at some point in their lawyerly future.  One thing’s for sure, we live in the ‘Age of Fear’.  And kids are being taught to be afraid of everything.  No wonder so many are so miserable.

If you are concerned about the fact that women are not yet represented fully in academia, this post is for you.  Give it a read.

Need preaching guidance?  Why not get it from someone who preaches every now and again but isn’t engaged in full time pastoral ministry?  He’s got advice for you from the sidelines.  And what better advice is there besides from a person who doesn’t actually have to do what they suggest that you do?

You know you’ve reached peak academic self-importance when you have your students answer your email.  Like Wayne Grudem.  Don’t be like Wayne.  Answer your own email.   [Why would I include this bit?  Because it’s good for us to remind ourselves that we are scholars and not celebrities.  And when scholars begin to act like celebrities, they need to be reminded of their calling.]

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Thanks for coming!  Next month the Carnival will be hosted by, as Phil puts it – “veteran Biblio-blogger Bob MacDonald is hosting the February carnival (due March 1) and newcomer Brent Niedergall hosts in March 2020 (Due April 1).  I am looking for volunteers for the rest of 2020. If you hosted in 2019 feel free to volunteer again, but I am also interested in getting new bloggers and podcasters involved. Six of the hosts in 2019 were first-time hosts.

Carnivals are fun to write and a good Carnival draws attention to your blog. The Amateur Exegete posted his year in Blog Summary last week, his August 2019 carnival was his second most popular post of the year.  I would love to hear from a few volunteers and fill out the 2020 Biblioblog schedule, so contact me at plong42@gmail.com or twitter dm @plong42 to volunteer to host!

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Finis

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*I’d like to thank the many people who sent along submissions for this month’s Carnival. In all the years I’ve been doing these Carnivals I’ve never received as many excellent submissions. So, thanks!

The Dead Sea Scrolls Detectives: A Review

NOVA’s special on the Scrolls aired again this morning and I finally had the chance to watch it.  It’s pretty good.  If you haven’t seen it yet, you should.

It maintains some old notions, like the site of Qumran being a monastery.  But it also has a lot to say about the appearance of so many fragments of late and the questions concerning their authenticity.  The Museum of the Bible features large.

Many of the usual experts appear including Schiffman and Henze along with Gutfeld and Pinor as well as, of course, Jodi Magness and John Collins.

The narrative moves back and forth between the early discovery of the scrolls and the modern questions of provenance and authenticity.  This is a bit disconcerting, but tolerable.  It would have been better if the story had followed the actual timeline of events rather than its back and forth between past and present.

The purchasers of these scroll fragments are normally wealthy American Evangelicals and this creates a market and markets create opportunities for fraud.  As a result of these facts, Hobby Lobby, the Greens, and the Museum of the Bible also come in for extensive mention.

The hunt for forgeries is also finely presented.

In sum, then, its a worthwhile use of an hour of your time.  You can watch it livestream here.

Dead Sea Scroll Detectives… Did You Miss It? Well You’re In Luck…

It’s on the air again in the morning, Friday November 8, at 5 a.m.  Set your DVR.

Dead Sea Scroll Detectives

Since the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in 1947, these fragile parchment relics have intrigued scholars, religious leaders, and profiteers alike. The 2,000-year-old scrolls include the oldest-known versions of the Hebrew Bible and hold vital clues about the birth of Christianity. While certain scrolls have survived intact, others have been ravaged by time—burnt, decayed, or torn to pieces—and remain an enigma. Now, scientists are using new technologies to read the unreadable, solve mysteries that have endured for millennia, and even discover million-dollar fakes. (Premiering November 6, 2019 at 9 pm on PBS)

Set your DVR.  It’s on PBS and not the ‘history’ channel so it should be pretty good.

New From Brill, Free in Open Access

Vision, Narrative, and Wisdom in the Aramaic Texts from Qumran:

Essays from the Copenhagen Symposium, 14-15 August, 2017

The Aramaic Dead Sea Scrolls from Qumran have attracted increasing interest in recent years. These texts predate the “sectarian” Dead Sea scrolls, and they are contemporary with the youngest parts of the Hebrew Bible. They offer a unique glimpse into the situation before the biblical canons were closed. Their highly creative Jewish authors reshaped and rewrote biblical traditions to cope with the concerns of their own time. The essays in this volume examine this fascinating ancient literature from a variety of different perspectives. The book grew out of an international symposium held at the University of Copenhagen in August 2017.

#ICYMI- Let’s Not Forget BAR’s Role in Publishing Scrolls From The Same Sources

Five of its Dead Sea Scroll fragments are fake, the Museum of the Bible in Washington was forced to admit last week. The embarrassed institution may be in good company: Out of at least 70 fragments ostensibly from the Scrolls held in various collections around the world, scholars warn that all are probably forged.

As the experts ponder who is responsible for the scandal in the Museum of the Bible, which may be the largest case of antiquities fraud in years, some researchers are placing a big chunk of the blame on a surprising culprit: themselves.

“Without the scholars, we would not have this big scandal,” agrees Arstein Justnes, a professor of biblical studies at the University of Agder, Norway, who also runs the blog The Lying Pen of Scribes, which tracks the suspicious scroll fragments.

But how could this have happened? How difficult is it to establish that a fragment of pottery or scroll is genuine? The answer is, not as difficult as you might think.

In his opinion, Justnes says, if the fragments in the Bible Museum had turned out to be genuine, they still shouldn’t have been displayed unless the museum divulged their provenance and proved they were legit.

But by uncritically publishing the scroll fragments, the scientific community “sent a strong signal to the antiquities market that it really didn’t care too much about provenance,” he says. “This really stimulated the antiquities market, and it was an encouragement to every looter under the desert sun. For over 15 years, several prominent Dead Sea Scrolls scholars have effectively laundered unprovenanced material.”

And more, which do read.  And though the article completely ignores the major role that BAR has played in the entire Scrolls story, BAR too bears some responsibility.

Rewritten Genesis

More Forged Scrolls in a Major Collection

My colleague Torleif Elgvin and I just published a paper in which we discuss Dead Sea Scrolls forgeries in the Schøyen Collection.

In this paper, we offer a global assessment of all Dead Sea Scrolls in the Schøyen collection. Several fragments had already been excluded from the official volume, but we argue that there are more forgeries.

To find out, please read our paper, available on Peeter’s website or below.

Torleif Elgvin and Michael Langlois, “Looking Back: (More) Dead Sea Scrolls Forgeries in The Schøyen Collection,” Revue de Qumrân 113 (2019): 111–33.

Friends, if you aren’t skeptical of every ‘bible’ discovery, whether it be an artifact or a text, you’re not doing your job. These days artifacts are guilty until proven innocent.  Don’t allow the BAR-ification of biblical studies to deceive you.

Oxford Commentary on the Dead Sea Scrolls

The Oxford Commentary on the Dead Sea Scrolls is a series intended for the scholarly study of the most important non-biblical Dead Sea Scrolls. It aims to provide scholarship of the highest level that is accessible to non-specialists, based on the best digitized images and readings. Each volume will include a synthetic and substantial introduction, followed by a line-by-line commentary on the scrolls. The commentary will provide an English translation, textual notes and thematic discussions of the original Hebrew text of the scrolls.

Etc.

Schweich Lectures on Biblical Archaeology- George Brooke

If you can attend, do.

Michael Langlois and the Dead Sea Scrolls

I was interviewed by Science & Life Magazine on recent issues pertaining to the Dead Sea Scrolls, including forgeries.

You can find the magazine here; I also attach the article in PDF format:

Marielle Mayo, “La saga de Qumrân continue” in Les Cahiers de Science & Vie 185, 04/2019, p. 10-13.

I want to thank journalist Marielle Mayo for contacting me when she was writing this article. The saga of the Dead Sea Scrolls is indeed not over! 🙂

Via.

The Dead Sea Scrolls and Ancient Media Culture

If you’re in London, you should go to this.

Ezra-Nehemiah and the Dead Sea Scrolls: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Call for Papers

This International Conference explores the wider horizons of the agenda of Professor Charlotte Hempel’s AHRC Project on Ezra’s Legacy and the Dead Sea Scrolls: Law and Narratives of Exclusion. Papers are invited on any aspect of research on Ezra-Nehemiah and the Dead Sea Scrolls in the broadest sense including the history of Jewish Law, Prayer in the Second Temple Period, the role of founder narratives and figures, the linguistic landscape including multi-lingualism, gender and sexuality studies, the social movements and tensions depicted in both literatures and the contribution of archaeology. Equally pertinent is the wider canvas of the pre-history of Rabbinic Judaism and the New Testament, and other Earl. Finally, any aspects not mentioned explicitly here that might creatively and innovatively be related to this broad research agenda will be considered.

Etc.

Michael Langlois’s Latest on the Scrolls, for Figaro

There are a lot of good people doing work on the Dead Sea Scrolls, but there is no one I trust more on their paleography and provenance than Michael.

Read his latest.

The September Biblical Studies Carnival: A Learning Extravaganza At the Fair

Below you’ll find a whole midway of Biblical Studies learning.  Check out the Hebrew Bible Hoop Shot, The New Testament Nacho Stall, the Archaeology Arcade, The Miscellaneous Mouse Coaster, and the Book Bumble Bee!  There are enough thrills here to delight even the most stoic scholar or student.  Or even the most angry of the angriest angry atheists.

At the Gate

Before you proceed one step further, you HAVE to read Dan Wallace’s post on the importance of the biblical languages in theological education.  Go do it now.

The Hebrew Bible Hoop Shot

It’s time to try your skills with the round ball and see how many points you can score by reading the posts described.  To start off, give a read to this essay which is over on Travis Bohlinger’s blog on teaching Hebrew Bible outside of your confessional boundaries if you aren’t Jewish.

There’s some Hebrew Bible stuff noted by Jose here.  3 points.

Mid October be sure not to miss the Annual Genizah Lecture if you are in or around Cambridge.  If you attend, you get three points.

John Rogerson lectured, shortly before his death (on 4 September, 2018- may he rest in peace), on the forgiveness of sin.  Give it a watch.  Deane has also assembled other lectures by Rogerson on things like the Kingdom of God and the Prophets.

James Tabor (my best friend from olden times) posted an interesting snippet on the Messiah before Jesus.  Give it a read.

The LXX readers edition editors are very excited about pre-publication endorsings.  You may be too.  Personally I’m very excited about the volume’s appearance.  In spite of the fact that I haven’t seen it…

Semitica is out with a new volume, number 60, edited by Langlois and Römer.

Did you know that Song of Songs was the most popular book of the Bible in the Middle Ages?  Yup.  Thanks, weird ‘Jesus is my boyfriend’ mystic loons.  Read the post.  It’s good.

The New Testament Nacho Stall

Time for a snack, on New Testament cheesy nachos.  First up, the British New Testament Society annual meeting was held at St Mary’s, Twickenham.  There was plenty of tasty tacos and buttery biscuits and cotton candy to be had by all who attended.  The conference, open to all who are duly qualified, meets every September somewhere in the UK.

Christian Brady has some observations about the Syro-phonecian woman.  Spicy!

Nympha, anyone?  Nympha and the letter to the Colossians?  Well here’s your post!  Give it a read.  It’s spicy!

Michael Jones has some great stuff (jalapeno-esque) to say about Schweitzer and Paul and suffering.  Michael has been friends with Timothy Bertolet for a long time, so he’s something of an expert on suffering.

For pity’s sake… stop with the goat talk.  Richard Goode is behind this.  Richard *The Goat* Goode is a bad, bad, bad, bearded, bad man.

Conrad Gempf (LST) gave a 20 minute talk on Jesus and the Scriptures.  Enjoy.  It’s got a bit of onion but cheesy onion nachos are super.

Lauren Larkin on Luke.  Lovely.  Look.  It’s laudable.

Did you know that Mark’s use of the Old Testament is important for understanding his Christology?  Wow.  Next, we discover that water, when liquid, is wet, and we then learn that a bullet to the head can be seriously injurious!!!!!  More cheese please!

Christian Brady did a video lecture for a group and even though it posted at the tail end of August, I’m including it here, because I know you never saw it:

Phil Long did a series of posts on the Sermon on the Mount.  Here’s the kickoff.  And you can find the rest on his blogge.

Here’s a recap of the BNTS annual meeting.  Nice work, Travis…  Travis seems like a nice person though he may well not be.  I don’t know.  I’ve not met him.  He may be a serial killer.  Who knows.  Anyway, read his post.  It’s not like he can reach through your screen and strangle you.

Luke 23:46… in music….  Okie dokie.  That’s nacho-esque right there.  Very nacho-esque.

Jimbob Snapp has some interesting comments about Mark 7:3f.  It’s a load of nachos without too much cheese.  (But I wish he had a better blog layout.  I don’t like the aesthetics of it.  That’s just me, and I’m not being judgy, but it reminds me of the 1st generation America Online style and it hurts my soul and senses).

Mike Bird has some interesting things to say about the book of Revelation and the doctrine of revelation.  Give it a read.  It’s just mildly cheesy.

The Archaeology / Dead Sea Scrolls Arcade

Test your skills and see if you can tell the fakes from the real thing.  One thing’s certain; the articles from Dead Sea Discoveries and made freely available to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the journal are anything but fakes.

Israel Finkelstein lectured in Zurich and the three lectures have been posted on the University’s theology department YouTube page.  Enjoy.  There’s lot’s of wisdom there.

Michael Langlois was in Australia talking about forgery stuff.  If you missed it, you missed it.

Did they find the church where the First Council of Nicaea was held nearly 1700 years ago?  Maybe.  The evidence sure seems to be there.  If they did, well that’s just pretty cool.  And I can’t wait to see how BAR exaggerates it!  Fun times!

On the other hand, 9 Dead Sea Scrolls ‘discovered’ in recent years are obviously fakes.  Well, I mean obvious to everyone but BAR readers.  But, speaking of the Scrolls, T&T Clark published what will be a standard volume for study of the Scrolls on the 20th.  It’s a massive volume with massive amounts of information.

If you would like to learn archaeology from an actual archaeologist- take Aren Maeir’s MOOC – coming soon!  It looks fantastic.

The Miscellaneous Mouse Coaster

Sit back, relax, and prepare to be turned upside down and lose all the change in your pocket.  Michael Bird has some thoughts on dealing with predatory priests drawn from Basil.  If only the Romanists would follow Basil’s guidance.

Ready to be really horrified?  Then hop on the academic publisher paywall exploitation express!  Yeah, I’m looking right at you JSTOR.

There’s still time for you to make plans to attend the Mowinckel Memorial Lecture, given in November by the brilliant Anne Katrine Gudme.

The Museum of the Bible… some don’t like it.  Peter talks about how Alexander talks about it.  It’s worth talking about their talking about it but it itself is something each person on their own has to decide their feely feelings about without having their sentiments dictated to them from Iowa or Yale or Birmingham.  Make up your own minds, sheeple.

Get your calendar (or diary, if you’re a Britlander) and take note of the dates of the 2019 meeting of IOSCS.  And if that meeting doesn’t make your heart pound maybe Syriac Bootcamp will…  Man that sounds terrifying.  I don’t know, but I think they make you eat Syriac and drink Syriac and carry around big heavy bags of Syriac and sleep on Syriac and it all seems so cruel.  But maybe you’re into that…

Randy B. takes a look at the Golden Mouth and Calvin.  Sure, it’s not something related to the Bible but it’s a good post so I’m including it.  If you don’t like it, be sure to comment below….

Interesting lecture here about those who like and those who don’t like Semites, in biblical studies.  And thanks, Deane.  Speaking of Deane Galbraith, he wins the post title of the month with this one: An Assmannian Global Spirituality Index.  Germans have such funny names.  And talk about a roller coaster stomach churning plunge…

There was a lot of discussion of Nike this month.  Randy did the best job of discussing it.  You should read it.  Strictly speaking, it’s not a biblical studies post- but it does have to do with biblical interpretation/application and that’s a good enough reason to include it here.

Hey, go work at Emory!  If your thing is New Testament, that is.  They already have Jacob Wright, so they don’t need anyone else for Hebrew Bible.

The Book Bumble Bee

Welcome to the stinging (of your bank account).

First up, the Logos free book of the month for September was Walter Kaiser’s ‘Preaching and Teaching the Last Things’.  It’s a different one now, because the free book for October is up.  And I don’t know what it is.  Because this post went live before the posting of the new free book of the month.  So go find out what it is.  And avoid Kaiser’s book because it’s fundamentalist rubbish.

Don’t miss Paula Fredriksen’s review of Matthew Thiessen’s book on Paul.

Michael Jones is sharing news of a 40th anniversary edition of Sanders’ ‘Paul and Palestinian Judaism’.  Go ahead and get a copy if you don’t already have one.  It’s quite a large book (which means it says far more than we know) and it is a real sleep aid / door stop / deadly weapon when hurled at an annoying person’s head!  It’s multi-purpose!

Evidently one or two people who read something called ‘Credo’ magazine must be mildly interested in actual biblical scholarship (I know, it shocked me too), because they convinced Will Ross to write something about the LXX.  I’m sure in their heads they read that ‘El, ex, ex’ and don’t know what it means.  Hopefully Will can help them.

Don’t read this terrible interview by the terrible Travis Bowlinger of the equally terrible Chris Le Keith.  Don’t do it.  It’s about a good series but the two principles of the post are terrible.  Terrible……..

Interested in the history of scholarship?  German scholarship?  German Dead Sea Scrolls scholarship?  If you answered yes, this will be of interest to you.

Do take a look at the post on the OUP blog about a new book on Darwinism.  You won’t regret it as much as you would a bee sting.

Exit

We hope you had fun.  But, really, it doesn’t matter.  Because we did.  As you leave, make sure you haven’t forgotten your children.  And here’s our final word, brought to you by Terry Eagleton:

“Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology.” Terry Eagleton

Hahahahaha.  Dilettante owned.

See you next time!

Revue de Qumran

The new issue is online.  Enjoy.

If You’re in Australia…

Michael Langlois is there-

I will be in Sydney for an international conference on 20–21 Sept 2018. I have been invited by Macquarie University to give a paper at a meeting entitled “Manuscripts from the Margins: How to edit a forgery”. My paper is entitled: “The Jerusalem Papyrus: Is it a forgery, and how to deal with it?

More here.

Fake Scrolls

Doubtless BAR will think they’re legit, but BAR has ad space to sell and dilettantes to please.

Six More

They’re all free.

The Bible, Qumran, and the Samaritans

Read the TOC and frontmatter here.