News From Oxford

Via James Aitken-

A large gathering for the first of the Oxford seminars in the series: “Greek Expanded, Greek Transformed. The Vocabulary of the Septuagint and the Cultural World of the Translators”. Jan Joosten spoke on how the Septuagint came about, emphasizing we should not overstate its special beginnings but recognize how religious terms and ideas in Hebrew had already been rendered in Aramaic, paving the way for Greek renderings. He went on to describe features of LXX vocabulary, how the vocabulary was put to use to render religious terms, and how these terms then caught on in the history of the language among Jews and Christians.

Prof Teresa Morgan in a response raised a number of pertinent questions, including: how far are changes unintended accidents from the translation process? Given that in Hellenistic education, anyone who could read and write at all would have a grasp of classical Attic, why did the translators choose non-literary Koine? Can we see the impact of LXX anywhere else than in Christian texts? And does it matter for our interpretation of words that the text has been a subject of 2000 years of exegesis?

A lively discussion followed, revolving on how to really understand Septuagint vocabulary, on the relation to the Hebrew, and on the translation process.

[abstracts not written by the speakers]

Katholische Reformationen

Tagung an der Bischöflichen Akademie Aachen, 17. / 18. Februar 2018.

“Protestant seit 1517” konnte man auf einem Werbeprodukt in Wittenberg jüngst lesen.

Aber gab es vor 500 Jahren schon “Protestanten”?

War gar Martin Luther der ersten Protestant? Unsere Tagung geht davon aus, dass Reform ein Dauerthema zu Beginn des 16. Jahrhunderts war. Vor diesem Hintergrund nehmen wir die nicht-reformatorischen Reformen in den Blick und wagen so einmal eine andere Perspektive auf Luther und seine Zeitgenossen in Sachsen, Bayern und im Rheinland.

Referenten: Prof. Dr. Volker Leppin, Tübingen; Prof. Dr. Bernward Schmidt, Aachen; Prof. Dr. Peter Walter, Freiburg; u.a.

Mehr

Online weiterlesen

Via.

Summer Course at the University of Geneva

Ce cours-séminaire intensif, qui s’étale sur cinq jours entiers, s’adresse en priorité aux doctorant-e-s, de Suisse comme de l’étranger, mais il est également ouvert aux post-doctorant-e-s ainsi qu’aux étudiant-e-s de master dès la 2e année. Il peut être intégré dans le module de master IHR, à la place d’un séminaire semestriel. En 2018, il se tiendra du lundi 4 au vendredi 8 juin. L’enseignement sera donné par par Maria-Cristina Pitassi et Daniela Solfaroli Camillocci, avec la collaboration de Christian Grosse (Lausanne). Le thème traité sera:

Construire la foi, confesser sa foi.
Production et critiques de la norme religieuse en milieu réformé
XVIe-XVIIIe siècles

Pour plus de détails sur ce cours en tant qu’enseignement intégré dans le cadre du module de master – en particulier concernant les crédits, voir les règlements respectifs de la Faculté de Théologie, du Département d’histoire générale et de l’Unité d’his­toire des religions.

Via.  Now I just need a wealthy benefactor to make it happen for me.  Bill Gates?

Nordic New Testament Conference

The forthcoming Nordic New Testament Conference will take place on 8 – 12 June 2018 at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik. The conference supports Nordic scholarship on Early Christianity by facilitating continual Nordic interaction within the scholarly field.

Etc.  Here.  Nordic is one of my favorite countries.  I like it a lot better than I like the country of Texas.

EABS Call for Papers

Via Charlotte Hempel-

Call for Papers

EABS is excited to announce its tenth Graduate Symposium, which will take place at the Finnish Institute in Rome, from 23rd- 25th March 2018.

The symposium, which seeks to engender a supportive atmosphere for dialogue across a variety of biblical studies fields and subfields (Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, its reception/interpretation history, the ancient Near East, and any relevant cognate areas, New Testament, its reception/interpretation history, early Christianity, Rabbinics, Patristics and any relevant cognate areas, also, areas such as Qumran studies, Alexandrian Judaism, Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, etc.), welcomes PhD candidates and postdoctoral researchers to present on a topic related to their research area(s).

Participants may format their presentation according to their preference: paper, seminar discussion, poster or another form.

Every abstract will be anonymously reviewed by a team of scholars who will give feedback and suggestions for improvement, if necessary. Our goal is to assist in developing the abstracts to the best possible form and to encourage authors to submit them to research seminars of the 2018 EABS Annual Meeting. We also encourage authors to enter the EABS Student Prize by submitting their papers for evaluation after the symposium.

During the symposium, each student will be given 20 minutes to present his/her paper, which will be followed by an extended discussion. The EABS Graduate Symposium looks forward to welcoming some senior scholars who will offer feedback and share from their own experience in the field. In addition, the symposium looks forward to continuing its tradition of holding a joint trans-Atlantic session with graduate students from the University of Emory.

Candidates should submit their abstracts and/or posters of no more than 300 words to students@eabs.net no later than January 25th, 2018. Please do not forget to mention the preferred format in the abstract (i.e. paper, workshop, pre-circulated paper, discussion, poster, etc.). Participants have to be members of the EABS. The one-year membership for 2018 is €10.

General information
The EABS Graduate symposium is a weekend event supported by EABS and has been running every spring for the past seven years. It is a residential event run by and for graduates and emerging scholars. It is always kept small with about 12-14 papers and workshops over the course of the weekend and around 15 people in attendance. In the past, people have come from the USA, Israel, and across Europe to attend the event. At each event at least two senior scholars, including the current President of EABS, have been in attendance. Since 2010, there has been a joint session via video-conferencing with graduates and Professors from the University of Alberta, Canada. In 2015 and 2016 we were joined via video conference from colleagues at Emory University. The first symposium was held at Gladstone’s Library in Hawarden, Wales. In 2010 it took place near Gent, Belgium, in 2011 at St Patrick’s College, Maynooth, Ireland, in 2012 in Hamburg, Germany, in 2013 in Sheffield, England, in 2014 in Thessaloniki, Greece, in 2015 in Leuven, Belgium, in 2016 in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and in 2017 in Munich, Germany.

Looking forward to hearing from you,

Batanayi I. Manyika
Graduate Student Representative

The 2018 Calvin Conference at Westminster Theological Seminary

Since 1974, the International Calvin Congress has been meeting in forums around the globe to further the academic and theological study of John Calvin’s work. The Congress has been held at academic institutions in South Africa, Germany, Japan, Scotland, Switzerland and the United States. Westminster Theological Seminary is proud to be the selected institution for the 12th meeting of the Congress, which will be held August 26–31, 2018.

The purpose of the International Calvin Congress is to bring together scholars from around the world, both from university and seminary settings, who focus their work on the history and doctrines of John Calvin. The scholars who participate are not necessarily in ministry or church work, but they are scholars who universally recognize the importance of Calvin and the Reformation.

During the Congress meetings there are typically two plenary keynote addresses, along with several smaller sessions where scholars are invited to present papers on various topics. The main theme of the 2018 Congress is “John Calvin: the Bible’s Impact on Politics and Freedom.” The papers are typically presented in English, German or French, and many of them are formally published after the Congress.

In hosting the 2018 International Calvin Congress, Westminster will be welcoming many renowned Reformation scholars from across the globe. “We hope that our students will not only join us in welcoming the scholars onto our campus but will also participate in the conference by attending the lectures and, if appropriate, perhaps even share in presenting a short paper,” Lillback commented. Rules for paper submissions will be posted at a later date.

John Calvin will be honored in a number of ways at Westminster in 2018. Not only will the Congress be held on campus, but Dr. Carl Trueman and Dr. Bruce Gordon will be publishing their book, The Oxford Handbook of Calvin and Calvinism. This significant volume will contain 20–30 essays, each of which will be devoted to a unique aspect of Calvinism. Some of the topics include Calvinism in Brazil, Calvinism and Scottish literature, and Calvinism and secularism.

As we finish out the year, Westminster will be continuing preparations for the publication of this book as well as hosting the 2018 International Calvin Congress. Our Communications department is developing a website for the Congress, which will be live in the first half of 2017 and will provide information on event registration, paper submission and other important details. We will continue to update our website as further details are confirmed.

Mark your calendars!  The 2014 meeting in Zurich was absolutely brilliant, so Philadelphia is a must attend.  And keep a lookout for updates on the Conference website (on the off chance that I miss them).

Hawarden OT in the NT Conference News

Dear colleagues,

Just a reminder that I am accepting abstracts and offers of papers for our 2018 Hawarden Seminar until the end of this week (Friday 15th Dec), so please do get in touch if you would like to present. I hope to confirm acceptance and circulate the draft programme in mid-January. Thanks to all those of you who have already booked and have let me know – we still have a few spaces left if anyone else wants to come – please see the original email below for full details about booking procedures, costs etc.

Wishing you all the very best for the end of term and a happy Christmas,

Susan

Professor Susan Docherty
Professor of New Testament and Early Judaism/Head of Theology
Newman University Birmingham

http://www.newman.ac.uk/profile/1432/dr-susan-docherty

Upcoming Colloquia

The ETCBC would like to welcome all who are interested to our upcoming colloquiums throughout the Spring semester. We will have a variety of speakers, touching on topics such as Hebrew vocabulary training and statistical approaches to diachronic Hebrew language change. See the full schedule below. You can always check our Google Calendar to see the most up to date event information.

Go here for the list.

The Wide-Ranging 2017 Biblical Studies Carnival and SBL Annual Meeting Edition

This month, besides blogposts and the like, I’m going for a true ‘Biblical Studies’ Carnival, which means that news stories, blog posts, and other sources of biblical joy are included in what follows, in a true Carnival of Things.  In other words, if it’s biblical studies related stuff, you’ll find it here in this joyful Carnival, which I’m calling ‘The Wide-Ranging 2017 Biblical Studies Carnival and SBL Annual Meeting Edition‘.  Enjoy!

Hebrew Bible Merry-Go-Round

Michael Langlois discussed the reception of the Torah in deuterocanonical literature in a lead up to the discussion of the same topic at SBL.  My chief regret in missing SBL this year was missing my annual lunch with Michael and hanging out even if ever so briefly with Thomas Römer and Ralph Keen.  *Next Year in Denver, DV*.

The Dead Sea Scrolls forgery scandal continued to make news in November and notice was given of a series of lecture videos from a conference on the topic.  And it even made Live Science. Speaking of the Scrolls, do give this podcast with John Collins a listen.  He discusses Scrolls and other interesting topics.

The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew is on the Twitter- so naturally you’ll want to follow them.  Because it’s a Hebrew Dictionary.  On Twitter.

James Spinti has a post on imprecatory prayers.  They’re my favorite.  Whenever anyone asks me to pray for them, I pray imprecations because 1) that’s what I assume they want unless told otherwise and 2) they’re my favorite prayer genre.  Would any of you like me to pray for you, or a ‘friend’?

Here’s a discussion of Hebrew poetry.  I think you might enjoy it.

Bible and Interpretation had a nifty book excerpt on a study of Ruth that is worth your time if you haven’t already seen it.  William Ross, meanwhile, had an interview with Ben Wright about the Septuagint.  It’s worth a read.

Meanwhile, OT folk didn’t have time to blog because they were in Boston for SBL.

New Testament Midway

Alin Suciu had an interesting little snippet about the appearance of Egyptian hieroglyphs in a Canon table.  You don’t see that every day, do ya?  In the ‘exciting news’ department, word of the impending publication in English of Peter Stuhlmacher’s absolutely brilliant New Testament Theology brought a pitter patter to this darkened heart.  That work in English has been long desired.  And it is, without question, the best NT theology since Bultmann’s.  In some respects it’s better.

Mark Goodacre is on the YouTube, denying Q.  Very dastardly.  Very.  I do like it that they filmed the clip at Mark’s house though, in the entry hallway.  Very cool.

Paul Long has some thoughts on dealing with people who disagree with you.  Personally I can’t use his advice because if anyone disagrees with me I know they’re mentally unstable.  But you folk might find it useful.

The STEP Bible now includes the Tyndale House (Cambridge) Greek New Testament.  Take a look.  And remember, you can download the software for your personal use.

Always on the cutting edge, the Jesus Blog gives notice of a book that was published back in 2014.  Stay tuned, as next month they tell us about a new book they’ve discovered by a little known chap named Schweitzer on the quest for the historical Jesus!

If you’re looking for a job teaching New Testament in Geneva, this post is for you.

Someone is said to have discovered a ‘lost text’ in Codex Bezae.  But if it’s been discovered it can’t be lost….  Re-discovered, sure.  Discovered?  Nah.

Peter Williams had an interesting discussion on the parable of the sower.  Take a look.  Phil Long does a nice job discussing faith and action in a post on Titus.  He may be from Texas, but he still makes sense from time to time.

Taylor’s talking about Whiteness and objectivity in NT studies and that sort of thing.  I’m not really into all that race talk because I don’t see color.  Or sex.  People are just people to me.  Evidently some of you are different though.  Anyway, Taylor wraps it up here.  I think he’s white.  I don’t know, like I said I don’t see color.

Larry posted some observations on the new edition of the Greek New Testament published by Crossway and produced by the wise folk at Tyndale House, Cambridge.  It’s a good overview of a good edition.

Not to be missed for any reason is the University of Nottingham playlist of videos on New Testament topics.

Larry *Chris Tilling is a Doofus* Hurtado had some kind words to say about a New Testament manuscript website.  You should read his post and check out the site.  It’s quite useful indeed.

Oh, and NT Wright is teaching a course on one of his books.  I’m sure some of you will want to spend your money on it so that your poor little children go unfed and your cat dies from neglect.

Tim Bulkeley wanted me to include this.  I’m not sure why.  He thought it was brilliant- and calls it in comments there the best post ever.  Not to me.  But perhaps Tim (and you) sees something that I’m missing.

Finally- Zurich hasn’t blogged all month.  Heartbreaking.  It’s normal for the slacker clans to ignore their blogging duties but when Zurich does it… the end is near.  Sell your stuff, move to a mountain top, and just wait.

Archaeology Arcade

A very fine resource for those interested in the Old Testament and Archaeology was published in November.  I highly recommend it.  So, what is it?  Go here to find out!  And be sure to catch up with what’s going on at Gath with Aren’s arcade-esque flurry post.

There’s a fun 3d tour of Qumran here that’s pretty engaging.  If you’ve been, it will bring back memories.  If you haven’t, it’s a great way to get a fresh look at a well known location.

Moss and Baden team up to talk about that supposed ‘fragment of Mark’ found in that Egyptian mummy.  Good stuff.

In Rome there was a meeting at which they discussed recent finds related to early Christianity in Jerusalem.  If you missed it, perhaps the organizers will provide you with the details.

Some guy (I couldn’t find his name on his blog- it must be very secret) shared some thoughts about the annual ASOR meeting.  Interesting take.  Be more interesting if it weren’t anonymous.

They found male skeletons at Qumran.  This is right interesting.  “33 skeletons recently unearthed at Qumran could offer clues to the origins of the Dead Sea Scrolls, which were discovered in 11 nearby caves between 1947 and 1956. Anthropologist Yossi Nagar of the Israel Antiquities Authority said the bones were radiocarbon dated to 2,200 years ago, or about the same time that the texts were written.”

Sarah Bond has a neat essay in Forbes Magazine about listening to ancient music in our time.  Great stuff.  Take a look and a listen.

The CSTT has a policy statement regarding its treatment of unprovenanced stuff.  Give it a read if you haven’t already.

Otherwise, the archaeologists were all off doing other things besides working in November.  It must be the month they take off or something.

SBL: The 2017 Side-Show (a.k.a. Freak Show)

I won’t be mentioning anything from AAR even though it meets at the same time and place as SBL – except this singular tweet- Great paper at #AAR17 by Meghan Johnston Aelabouni on ‘Playmobile Luther: Resisting anti-Judaism in the Iconization of Luther'”.  That’s something I would have attended.  In spite of it being an AAR session.

And like this kid, I’m kind of envious… until I hear about the weather in Boston, and then I’m cool with having skipped it this year.  Yikes.  “Trying hard not to be jealous of the folks getting their Hebrew-nerd on in Boston for #aarsbl17. Would love to hear some highlights.”

Amongst the bizarre-ities of this year’s SBL was a session on Greek Linguistics where they focused on those mysterious prepositions.  I wasn’t there, but I sure hope they finally got the meanings of those mysteries worked out.  Francesca Stravalo…. oh forget it read a paper which included the line ‘to a certain extent religion is just like porn’.  If you were at her session, you heard the context.  If you weren’t, maybe she’ll share her paper with you.

For those of you hesitant to attend SBL’s annual meeting, just know, there’s a session for every single conceivable sub-group-Attending Pregnant in the Field session in Sheraton Public Garden Room #sblaar17 #aarsbl17 #WomanistMomma.   But if giving birth isn’t your bag, maybe war is…  “Today @ 9AM: Joshua Canzona, John Chappo, John Laaman, Chip Kooi, and Joshua Jeffery discuss Religion and World War I during the Religion and War Exploratory Panel! Come see us! HCC-203

Doug Boin mentioned his forthcoming work- For my friends at #SBLAAR17: a new book, coming soon! (I’m pretty sure the content on this page is still being finessed, but here it is anyway).  http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1119077001.html

The University of Alabama Department of Religion tweeted- “Following and tweeting about #sblaar17? Our MA students are archiving #sblaar17 tweets to see what they can tell us about the academic study of religion”  That’s right, all your food and booze tweets are now part of a study…

Also for SBL attendees a resource for those who are subjected to mistreatment- SBAllies.  Several folk you know are involved.  Here’s their self-declared purpose:  “Our primary purpose is to give you a place to air your frustrations and talk through what you want to do next. It is a judgment-free zone.”  I have to say that I’m very surprised that I wasn’t invited to be a part.  Indeed, the more I think of it, the more I need a hug.

Chris Rollston was there.  Pity to miss this one- Now, Christopher Rollston on 20th/21st CE forged Hebrew inscriptions and the false presupposition that “hard scientific” facts and tests don’t need to be interpreted and contextualized. Rollston notes that it’s surprisingly easy to forge with ancient papyri and ink composed in ancient ways — thus, the “scientific facts” of a papyrus do not prove it is real or that it isn’t forged.”For too long, scholars have assumed a “stupid forger” that doesn’t know how to trick scholars — thus assuming that many forgers aren’t in fact TRAINED by scholars.

Fun news for those interested in studying the Qur’an- “Not long until qurangateway.org launches at #SBLAAR17 — come to our session and reception on Monday and find out more.”  Of course now it’s too late to go, but you can still check out the site.

The Dictionary of Classical Hebrew (yes, that’s a twitter account), tweets SBL 17 *The Vocabulary of Classical Hebrew: New Facts and Figures* Latest news from the Dictionary of Classical Hebrew Project— David J.A. Clines will be presenting, Monday 20th November, at the 4pm-6.30pm session in Boston (S20-311).  If you missed it.  The paper is here.

Even though women are involved in SBL,Wonderful session this afternoon on Warfare in Ancient Israel! 3/5 papers were female presenters & Q’s posed by women (inc.me!) #aarsbl17″  it’s pretty clear that more women need to get involved…   – The #nerdcation continues with a session on the linguistics of questions in Greek. Definitely at #SBLAAR17: I’m the only female in the room.”

It’s also pretty clear that this youngster is the winner of the #hashtag award for #sblaar17 – and maybe for all time-  Some facetime with the Dura Fragment. #DisserTatian

Our friends at Sheffield Phoenix Press tweeted “A #sblaar17 panel on ‘Feminist Interpretation of the Hebrew Bible in Retrospect’ @_SusanneScholz (ed.), on Sunday 4pm–6.30pm. All 3 vols (info. here bit.ly/2zERReo) new in paperback. @SBLsite @ShefPhoenix /#aarsbl17”    That would have been a good session to hang out in.

One of the sessions that looked particularly interesting was this one:50s- Prof. Reynolds responds to Mustafa Akyol’s “The Islamic Jesus””

I think you’ll want to ponder this little factoid from the meeting-Amazing message by Dr. Sandra Richter, OT scholar. If revival breaks out in the Academy, she would be one of the sparks #SBLAAR17″ 

Oh and, hey, while you’re at those interesting sessions, when someone is presenting, stop talking.  Especially if you’re on the front row….

Todd Brewer wrote up a three part report on the meeting- so be sure to give it a look.  Part three is here.  Two is here.  One is here.

If you missed the fun this year, be sure to be in Denver next.  And yes, DV, you’ll get to see me there.  You’re welcome.  Or, as Eric van der Gerbil put it- “SBL always leaves me a combination of refreshed and exhausted. I’m supremely thankful for the opportunity to reconnect with old friends, to make new ones, and, of course, to learn from all of you. Safe travels for all who are heading out today. Next year in Denver!”

Book Review House of Mirrors

A review of the very recent book titled ‘The Dictionary of the Bible and Ancient Media’ was posted early in the month.  It’s a review you’ll just have to read.  James Spinti reviewed a volume for young readers on Irenaeus, which I am including here in spite of the fact that it isn’t exactly a biblical studies volume but which deserves wide attention precisely because it’s for young readers.  Kids need to learn stuff that matters.

A short review of a new commentary on James is posted at Exegetical Tools.  If you aren’t familiar with that site, you aren’t alone.  And its title refers not to doofus exegetes (as one might suspect) but about the tools one uses for exegesis.

In true mirror-esque fashion John Meade informs us that his book (which no one has reviewed) is on sale.  I guess if such matters are a concern of yours, you’ll want to read this volume.

There’s a new review out of ‘The Earliest Alphabet’ that you’ll want to take a look at.

Miscellaneous Cotton Candy and Other Junk Food

Roberta Mazza is always vigilant when it comes to drawing our attention to antiquities that come from shady sources.  She shared a news report of the widespread presence of such artifacts online.  It’s worth repeating: if an antiquity shows up for sale, without clear provenance and proper documentation for legitimate sale, it’s looted.  She also has some info about the so called ‘Gospel of Judas‘.  She also drew our attention to an essay on Hobby Lobby and their Bible Museum in, of all places, the Wall Street Journal.

The Call for Papers has been issued for the EuARe Conference coming up in March.  All the details are here.

Bible Gateway has added the NRSV to its collection of app bibles.  Download instructions here.

Christian Brady pointed out this really important essay about mental health and PhD students.  If you’re a grad student, or you work with grad students, do give it a look.

Sage is offering free access to its religion journals as long as you register by NOVEMBER 30.   Oops…. I guess the offer has past.  Darn Carnival scheduling.  Oh well.  Maybe you should read my blog, where mention was made of this in mid November, in plenty of time for you to sign up…

John Barclay tells us what makes a good biblical scholar.  In stunning brevity.  Meanwhile Taylor Weaver tells the story of a person who is decidedly NOT a biblical scholar, even though Taylor doesn’t use the right word- dilettante.

Speaking of dilettantes- plagiarism.  Again.  By a ‘senior scholar’ who thought it would be cool to cut giant chunks of material from someone else and all he got for it was the public recognition that he stole and was forced to re-do his work (whilst his institution, SEBTS, did and said nothing about it).  #SorryNotSorry but if you plagiarize you’re a thief, and a dilettante.  Elsewise, you would just do your own work.

There’s a new facebook group for nearly everything even remotely related to biblical studies and all adjacent disciplines and sub-disciplines: Academic Biblical, Archaeological, Jewish, Christian, and Related Studies.

The End of the Show

Well, that’s it.  Visit next month’s Carnival hosted by someone somewhere.  Joel Watts, sing us out…

 

Society for Reformation Studies

2018 marks the four-hundredth anniversary of the convening of the Synod of Dordt, one of the most important gatherings of Protestant divines before modern times, with representatives drawn from Reformed churches across Europe, including Britain. The anniversary provides an opportunity to reflect upon the Synod itself, and more widely on the Reformed tradition in its various manifestations, and on its relationship with the broader Reformation.

A whole lot more is available here.  Including registration.

Academic Conferences as Neo-Liberal Commodities

With thanks to Joey Dodson for pointing out this neat review of a recent book of the above title on the twitter (bold print mine):

[The author] argues that, ultimately, the neoliberalisation of the university has resulted in changes whereby in place of the traditional professional culture of open intellectual enquiry and debate, there is now an institutional stress on measurable performance. By seeing knowledge as a product that can arise from a conference, Nicolson considers such events as having a role in the ‘knowledge enterprise’ industry that by promoting a method, data set or research cause as a commodity, becomes the product and marketplace itself. The academic culture of conferences themselves may vary: a point noted by Les Back when he characterises Australian ones as ‘vicious and boozy’, US conferences as ‘status conscious and networking-obsessed’ and British equivalents as ‘polite and consensual’. While recognising that reasons for attending conferences are also variable, the book nonetheless demonstrates how the overarching function of the conference lies in its premise of promoting intellectual communication.

Whilst I have no experiences of Australian conferences I can well imagine how very true that is.  And I know it’s a correct assessment of American and British conferences.  I must read this book.

EuARe Call For Papers

From Monday, March 5th to Thursday, March 8th, 2018, Bologna will host the first annual meeting of the European Academy of Religion.

The European Academy of Religion (EuARe) is a new constellation in European scholarship which was established in 2016 with the support of the European parliament. It aims to create an inclusive network, to act as an open platform, and to provide a framework to foster research, communication, exchange and cooperation concerning important religious issues for the academic world and society at large.

The program of the EuARe Conference 2018 will be composed of plenary (lectiones magistrales and roundtables) and working sessions (panels and papers).

On Tuesday 6th and Wednesday 7th, the Conference will host an international Moot Court Competition in Law & Religion, organized in cooperation with ICLARS – International Consortium for Law & Religion Studies.

In the location of the event, a display space reserved for publishers will be set up. Publishers are invited to organize book presentations with authors and to advertise their participation on their websites and in newsletters in order to draw public attention to their works and encourage attendance.

The Call has been recently published on the EuARe website: there you will find all the information you need about the Conference program and your participation (deadlines, registration fees, travel grants and accommodation).

If you wish to contribute to the Conference by convening a panel or applying for a single paper, we remind you that the deadline for proposal submission is Wednesday, December 20th (submission forms can be found here: https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/program). Registrations to the Conference, instead, will be open until Friday, February 16th (https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/registration). Early rates for registration will be available until December 20th (early bird) and February 16th (regular). After this date only on-site registration will be possible.

We also remind you that, starting this year, the EuARe will be granting memberships. Members will have the benefits of discounted conference rates and will be invited to join and participate in the next General Assembly, which will meet on Tuesday 6th of March. The Call will also give you more detailed information about the membership rates and the General Assembly. Membership application forms are available here: https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/membership.

Help us spread the word about the Conference, and circulate the Call among your university departments, institutions and societies, colleagues and students.

We are looking forward to welcoming you in Bologna!

European Academy of Religion
Via San Vitale 114, 40125, Bologna, Italy
+39 051 239532
eu_are@fscire.it
http://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org

2018 Conference organized by Fscire
http://www.fscire.it

European Academy of Religion Call For Papers

From Monday, March 5th to Thursday, March 8th, 2018, Bologna will host the first annual meeting of the European Academy of Religion.

The European Academy of Religion (EuARe) is a new constellation in European scholarship which was established in 2016 with the support of the European parliament. It aims to create an inclusive network, to act as an open platform, and to provide a framework to foster research, communication, exchange and cooperation concerning important religious issues for the academic world and society at large.

The program of the EuARe Conference 2018 will be composed of plenary (lectiones magistrales and roundtables) and working sessions (panels and papers).

On Tuesday 6th and Wednesday 7th, the Conference will host an international Moot Court Competition in Law & Religion, organized in cooperation with ICLARS – International Consortium for Law & Religion Studies.

In the location of the event, a display space reserved for publishers will be set up. Publishers are invited to organize book presentations with authors and to advertise their participation on their websites and in newsletters in order to draw public attention to their works and encourage attendance.

The Call, here attached, has been recently published on the EuARe website: there you will find all the information you need about the Conference program and your participation (deadlines, registration fees, travel grants and accommodation).

If you wish to contribute to the Conference by convening a panel or applying for a single paper, we remind you that the deadline for proposal submission is Wednesday, December 20th (submission forms can be found here: https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/program). Registrations to the Conference, instead, will be open until Friday, February 16th (https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/registration).  Early rates for registration will be available until December 20th (early bird) and February 16th (regular). After this date only on-site registration will be possible.

We also remind you that, starting this year, the EuARe will be granting memberships.
Members will have the benefits of discounted conference rates and will be invited to join and participate in the next General Assembly, which will meet on Tuesday 6th of March. The Call will also give you more detailed information about the membership rates and the General Assembly. Membership application forms are available here: https://www.europeanacademyofreligion.org/membership.

Help us spread the word about the Conference, and circulate the Call among your university departments, institutions and societies, colleagues and students.

We are looking forward to welcoming you in Bologna!

European Academy of Religion
Via San Vitale 114, 40125, Bologna, Italy
+39 051 239532
2018 Conference organized by Fscire