Category Archives: Conferences

ALERT: Hawarden Old Testament in the New Conference 2018 IMPORTANT NEWS

Susan Docherty writes, in part

Dear all,

I’m afraid there has been a mix up at the Hawarden end about our booking for the 2018 Seminar – they CANNOT after all accommodate us on the dates I recently circulated, i.e. March 21st to 23rd. However, they could offer us Thursday 22nd to Saturday 24th March, if we are willing to return to a previous pattern of meeting from Thursday evening to Saturday lunchtime. Alternatively, if we do want to go for a Wednesday to Friday meeting, we would have to meet earlier than usual, and in term time – 7th to 9th March. Could I ask those of you who are likely to be able to come next year to let me know within the next few days which of these two options would work best for you so that I can make a booking as soon as possible.

Please let Susan know ASAP.

Zwingli and Bullinger and their Influence: A Conference Announcement

Via Emidio Campi

If You’re in The United Kingdom, Anywhere at All…

You should attend this because it will be, literally, the worst thing you will ever attend. Think of it. Nothing you ever do the rest of your life will be worse!

Nuremberg 2017

The program for the Society for Reformation Research’s summer conference in Nuremberg on “Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Reformation Era” is now available online. http://www.nuremberg2017.org/

Take a look.

Call For Papers Extended

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the religious holiday weekend, coupled with “tax day” in the United States, the SCSC President and Vice President have agreed to extend the deadline for panel, paper, and roundtable submissions for the 2017 Milwaukee conference until Midnight (Eastern US Time Zone) on Monday 17 April.

If you haven’t yet had time to submit your proposal, or have experienced difficulty with internet connections, we hope this short extension will give you the extra time you need to make your submission.

Please send an email to conference@sixteenthcentury.org with any questions or if you experience any difficulty submitting.

Barth’s Interpretation of Luther: A Conference at the University of Basel

via

The Impact of Learning Greek, Hebrew and ‘Oriental’ Languages on Scholarship, Science, and Society in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

Call for papers.

Leuven, 13-15 December 2017

In 1517, Leuven witnessed the foundation of the Collegium Trilingue. This institute, funded through the legacy of Hieronymus Busleyden and enthusiastically promoted by Desiderius Erasmus, offered courses in the three ‘sacred’ languages Hebrew, Greek, and Latin. The initiative was not the only of its kind in the early 16th century. Ten years earlier, the first Collegium Trilingue had been established in the Spanish Catholic collegium of San Ildefonso, and similar institutes and language chairs were soon to follow. By the end of 1518, the university of Wittenberg offered courses of Hebrew, Greek, and Latin in the regular curriculum, whereas in 1530 king Francis I founded his Collège Royal in Paris after the model of the Louvain Collegium Trilingue. This fascination with Greek and Hebrew did not come out of nowhere, but had its roots in Renaissance Italy, whence it gradually disseminated to other parts of Europe. Moreover, it should be borne in mind that, as early as the beginning of the 14th century, the Council of Vienne had authorized and encouraged the foundation of professorships in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Arabic at four universities (Bologna, Oxford, Paris, and Salamanca), mainly in order to convert Jews, Muslims, and Oriental Christians to the ‘true’ faith. The council and Italian Humanism thus testify to the fact that enthusiasm for learning Greek and ‘Oriental’ (nowadays: Semitic) languages, next to Latin, among Western-European scholars and clergymen clearly predates the 16th century.

Etc.

The Dates for the 2018 Hawarden OT in the NT Conference

Dear colleagues,

This email is to give you advance notice of the date of the next Annual Seminar on the OT in the NT: we will be meeting in Gladstone’s Library, Hawarden, North Wales, as usual, from early evening on Wednesday 21st March until lunchtime on Friday 23rd March 2018. I look forward to seeing many of you there.

Wishing you all the best for the Easter season,
Susan

Professor Susan Docherty
Professor of New Testament and Early Judaism/Head of Theology
Newman University Birmingham

Only 10 Days Remain…

The Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC) is now accepting proposals for individual presentation submissions and complete panels for its 2017 annual conference. In this year, celebrating the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s “Ninety-Five Theses,” the SCSC will meet in Milwaukee, a city with a proud German and Lutheran heritage.  As always, we will accept papers on any topic within the “long sixteenth century,” not just those on Germany, or Lutheran subjects.

Abstracts (up to 250 words in length) for individual presentations and complete panels must be submitted online using the links at left.  Within four weeks after the April 15 deadline, the Program Committee will notify all those who submitted proposals. The conference will once again host poster sessions. Poster proposals should be submitted as “papers” to the digital history track. Please email: conference@sixteenthcentury.org for a poster session code BEFORE submitting poster proposals.

Etc.

Call for Papers- Reformation on the Record

From the Zurich New Testament Blog

A Fantastic Line up Of Panels for Wittenberg

See the list here.  It all happens at the ReforRC 2017 meeting.

Call For Papers Reminder

REMINDER:

The deadline for submission for papers and full panels for the 2017 SCSC annual meeting in Milwaukee is 15 APRIL 2017.

Abstracts (up to 250 words in length) for individual presentations and complete panels must be submitted online at: http://www.sixteenthcentury.org

Within four weeks after the April 15 deadline, the Program Committee will notify all those who submitted proposals. The conference will once again host poster sessions. Poster proposals should be submitted as “papers” to the digital history track. Please email: conference@sixteenthcentury.org for a poster session code BEFORE submitting poster proposals.

In addition to standard panels, the organizing committee will be accepting proposals for four types of alternate panels:

  • Workshop Option A: Discussion of pre-circulated papers in a workshop format (limit of 4 participants).
  • Workshop Option B: Analysis of thorny translation/paleography questions; pre-circulation not required (limit of 3 participants).
  • Workshop Option C: Examination of a big issue or question with brief comments from presenters and lively audience participation (similar to roundtables with more audience participation; limit of 4 participants).
  • Roundtables sponsored by affiliated societies.

Questions about formats should be directed to: conference@sixteenthcentury.org

Emory University Law School Announces – McDonald conference celebrates 500th anniversary of Protestant Reformation

The fourth in the McDonald Distinguished Scholar Lectures series celebrates the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation with a two-day international conference on April 3 and 4 at Cannon Chapel.  The conference is convened by the Center for the Study of Law and Religion and Candler School of Theology and sponsored by the McDonald Agape Foundation.  This event is free and open to the public. Complimentary boxed lunches for conference attendees will be served both days.

Here is the schedule.

It looks quite good!  See you there.

Lecture Announcement

Professor David J Chalcraft
Department of Sociology, Liverpool John Moores University, UK

“Moving Through Texts: The Rituals of Reading and the Sociology of Mobility”

Making use of perspectives from the sociology of mobility–the study of the movement of ideas, goods and objects and people across time and space–the lecture explores what kinds of historical, hermeneutical and explanatory connections might be made between the ways in which readers journey through texts, the now smaller and now larger material forms of the text itself and how it is distributed and transmitted, and the modes of mobility dominant in the social context of the reader and the material artefact of the text.

For example, does ‘walking with God’ have most resonance in a culture where walking is the hegemonic form of movement in the society and where a reader can gradually take a walking pace and route through the entire text, exploring all ‘highways and by-ways’? What are the consequences of the ontology of movement for the mode of literacy and for routes through texts? How are texts transported and carried from one place to another? What are the factors that encourage a text to reduce in physical size and breadth of content, and what factors encourage expansion and commentary? What advances in the technology of the production and transmission of texts interact with reading and travelling habits in day to day life?

Comparing instances across time and space of the variety of modes of movement, modes of reading, and material forms of texts can lead, it is hoped, to generalizations and also to illuminate particular bodies of textual tradition (in both ancient and more modern times, from the Hebrew Bible, the Dead Sea Scrolls, tefillin, Daily Bible Study, to bite-size Bible sandwich boards in the modern city) and their interpretation and significance.

I Was Too Sick to Do it In January, So We’ve Rescheduled It To September…

And I’ve corrected the date on the poster…  but my photoshop skills leave much to be desired…

The topic of my lecture is actually quite serious- On The Intersection of Academic Biblical Scholarship and the Life of the Church.  So if you’re in Birmingham or vicinity, come on out.  (Time TBA).

Bruce Gordon – Reflections on Prison and Exile in John Calvin

Watch the lecture Prof Gordon delivered at SEBTS here.

The Old Testament in the New Testament Hawarden Conference 2017 Programme

ANNUAL SEMINAR ON OT IN NT HAWARDEN 2017
Draft Programme

Wednesday 5th April

6.45 Dinner
Session 1 Chair: Susan Docherty
8.00 – 8.15 Welcome and Introductions
8.15 – 9.15 David Lees – Textual Ripples: A Different Methodological Approach

Thursday 6th April

From 8.00 Breakfast
Session 2 Chair: Steve Moyise
9.15 – 10.30 Joshua Coutts – The Catalyzing Role of Scripture for John’s Gospel
10.30 – 11.00 Coffee Break
Session 3 Chair: David Allen
11.00 – 12.30 Rikk Watts- Rethinking Context in the Relationship of Israel’s Scriptures to the NT: Character, Agency, and the Possibility of Genuine Change
12.30 – 1.00 Break
1.00 Lunch
Free Afternoon
3.30 – 4.10 Tea
Session 4 Chair: Susan Docherty
4.15 – 5.15 Bart Koet – A Tale of two Teachers: Jesus About Jesus and John the Baptist
5.15 – 6.15 Anthony Royle – The Vorlage of Paul’s Citation in Ephesians 5:14: New Horizons
6.15 – 6.45 Break
6.45 Dinner
Session 5 Chair: Steve Moyise
8.00 – 9.00 David Allen – What Makes ‘Two by Two’ Ark-etypal?

Friday 7th April

From 8.00 Breakfast
Session 5 Chair: Steve Smith
9.15 – 10.15 Kelsie Rodenbiker – Quotation vs Characterization: The Catholic Epistles and Old Testament Exemplars
10.15 – 10.45 Coffee Break
Session 6 Chair: Susan Docherty
10.45 – 11.45 Georg Walser – Quoted Text and Interpretation: Is There Always a Correspondence?
11.45 – 12.45 Hans Lammers – The Textual Form of the Quotation from Isaiah 6:10 in Mark 4:12: Influence from a Targumic Tradition or an Example of Inner-Gospel Exegesis?
12.45 – 1.00 Closing Reflections and Plans for Hawarden 2018
1.00 Lunch followed by departures

Abstracts

David Lees: Textual Ripples: A Different Methodological Approach?

In my research into the possible New Testament reception of the book of Esther, I have encountered difficulties by following more accepted methodological approaches such as Hays’ criteria. With the lack of NT scholarship that looks back to the book of Esther, one can enter circular arguments that are difficult to break out of (with regards to issues of volume and recurrence). As such, in this paper I will put forward the working hypothesis of a new methodology that, rather than looking back to the book of Esther, aims to travel forward with the book of Esther into the New Testament texts and world. To shape this, I propose the metaphor of textual ripples; each text is like a ripple or wave that travels outward from its original source interacting in different ways with different obstacles. Some ‘obstacles’ would be passed over and no interaction made, others cause the ripple to change direction, others may lead to ‘constructive interference’ where two or more waves converge, others may be more like a cliff face that cause a strong reaction with ‘textual spray.’ The context of the New Testament would determine the different forms of obstacle – accounting for the possibility that there may be no obstacle – and direct the researcher to evaluate whether there is textual evidence for this interaction. Rather than starting with a New Testament author and looking at what sources they use to shape their own text, this paper aims to open a conversation on how research can being with an Old Testament text and looking at how it may have rippled into, and reacted with, the New Testament context. This proposed methodology will be explored with a case study of the possibility that Esth. 8:17 can be identified in Gal. 2:14 through the word ιουδαιζω.

Joshua Coutts: The Catalyzing Role of Scripture for John’s Gospel

Many New Testament studies of intertextuality focus on how NT authors appropriate OT texts and themes. Observations are made on the hermeneutical principles which underlie the use of the OT, the interpretive tradition within which the NT authors operate, and the unique theological or stylistic motivations which may account for adaptations of the OT in new contexts. The comparison of texts has proven very instructive for answering such “how” questions, as we can observe similarities and differences in the use of the OT. Yet, often implicit in these discussions, are assumptions about why NT authors draw upon the OT. The question of what catalysts moved NT authors to draw upon the OT is more difficult to answer. Nevertheless, an attempt will be made in this paper to do so, with particular attention to John’s Gospel. There are likely several catalysts for John’s use of Scripture including an emerging Gospel tradition, the need to address problems such as Jewish obduracy, and the desire to legitimate the allegiance to Jesus of an emerging Jesus-community as contiguous with the narrative and promises of Israel. In addition to these, this paper will explore the possibility that Scripture in general, and perhaps particular texts of Scripture, were used against this emerging Jesus community (cf. John 5.39; 6.31; 7.52), and consequently had become a flashpoint around which the uniquely Johannine Gospel tradition coalesced.

Rikk Watts: Rethinking Context in the Relationship of Israel’s Scriptures to the NT: Character, Agency, and the Possibility of Genuine Change

Employing Collingwood’s notion of “historical imagination,” this paper seeks to imagine how the NT writers related to Israel’s Scriptures. Two assumptions appear foundational. First, as the eternal word of Israel’s unique and only God and creator, the faithful and unchanging Yahweh, the Scriptures were normative in revealing his character and in articulating his relationship with his creation and their relationship with him. If so, it makes better sense methodologically, to begin, not the with NT use of the OT, but Israel’s Scriptures’ normative shaping on the NT. Second, given Israel’s unique understanding of Yahweh and of his creation (gifting it with the possibility of genuine change) this relationship is primarily neither conceptual nor even literary but personal. Since persons are known through their agency (MacMurray), that is words and deeds over time, the fundamental orientation and “grammar” of this relationship ought to be historical and narratival. If so, “context” becomes a matter of where a given textually construed event fits into the larger narrative of Yahweh’s relationship to his creation and particularly what it says of his character and thus what Israel and the creation can expect of his future actions. This paper proposes that when viewed from this perspective the NT authors see what Yahweh has done in Christ to be both entirely consistent with his past and promised future interventions, and more profoundly revealing, of his character. We will examine some example texts, but hopefully allow considerable time for discussion.

Bart Koet: A Tale of Two Teachers – Jesus about Jesus and John the Baptist (Luke 7:18-35)

This paper poses a question about where we can find a great wisdom teacher who uses children’s rhymes to depict his teachings. Such a teacher can be found in Luke 7:31-35, where Jesus explains both his own teaching and John the Baptist’s and defends their teachings, albeit so different from each other, by referring to a children’s song. An analysis of the communication shows that in 7:35 there is a reference to the fact that all the people and even all the tax collectors choose the baptism of John and that therefore there is a possibility for the audience to become children of Wisdom by joining one of the teachers.

Anthony Royle: The Vorlage of Paul’s Citation in Eph. 5:14: New Horizons

The Vorlage of Ephesians 5:14 has been disputed by various scholars. The citation is introduced by the authoritative words “He (God) says”; however, there are no Scriptures that match the citation word for word, which has led to various hypothesises regarding its origin. Some scholars have noted similarities of phrases used in Ephesians 5:14 (Awake O Sleeper and rise from the dead) with Isaiah 26:19 (O dwellers in the dust, awake and sing or Joy) and Isaiah 60:1 (Arise, shine; for your light has come, and the glory of the Lord has risen upon you). The difficulty with this view is that Paul’s citation uses a different tense in Greek to Isaiah LXX. Furthermore, the insertion of the title χριστον (And Christ will shine on you) in place of the Isaiah LXX’s more frequent title, κυριον (Isaiah 60:1), indicates that it is unlikely Paul was citing any known written text of Isaiah and that the Ωorlage is Christian in origin. In response, some scholars have speculated Paul used an unknown apocryphal source, and even a Gnostic writing, for his citation. The majority view is that Paul is citing an early Christian baptism hymn that was inspired by a Spiritual song (Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16); however, the hymn is unlike any other creedal statement of the early church in the New Testament and the issue of baptism does not fit the context of Ephesians 5. As scholars have sought to propose a written Vorlage for Paul’s citation in past studies, this papers looks to new horizons of research that may lend to the evolution of Paul’s citation from Isaianic texts. I propose that the change of grammar, the conflation of texts, and the insertion of words in Paul’s citation from the LXX are impacted by three influences; rhetoric, social memory, and religious experience. Recent NT studies in these three areas have shown how they impact the citation technique of Paul and other NT writers, as well as their Jewish and Greco-Roman contemporaries. This paper seeks to highlight their importance to understanding the influence of Isaiah in Paul’s citation in Eph. 5:14.

Dave Allen: What makes ‘two by two’ ark-etypal?

In a recent article, Joan Taylor explores the accounts of Jesus sending disciples out 2 by 2, and concludes that this is an allusion to the Noah account of 2 by 2 entry onto the ark (with the implication that Jesus dispatches male and female ‘missionaries’ in such pairs). Taylor presents the allusion pretty much as an established given, and focuses more on the outcomes, so to speak, of the implied allusion. I would like to use her thesis on the mooted allusion as some sort of test case – what methodological assumptions does she make, and on what grounds does her proposal correlate with current OT/NT approaches?

Kelsie Rodenbiker: Quotation vs Characterization: The Catholic Epistles and Old Testament Exemplars

This paper examines the use of Old Testament (OT) exemplars by the seven-letter collection of Catholic Epistles (CE). Is their approach a matter of textual access, as some have suggested (e.g., Popkes regarding James)? I argue that, despite the diversity of authorship, dating, and theme within the CE, their use of exemplary OT figures is indeed strategic. There are fourteen OT quotations throughout the CE (primarily in 1 Peter), but eighteen exemplary figures. Significant connections to parabiblical/pseudepigraphal literature may be seen with regard to these figures (especially Enoch and Michael in Jude). However, read within the context of the canon they nonetheless evoke OT narratives. Further, because at least some of the CE can be shown to make use of textual material aside from their use of exemplars, I argue that access cannot be the only operative matter. I suggest, then, that the seven-letter collection presents a unique witness to the citation of OT figures alongside, and perhaps even in place of, quotations.

Georg Walser: Quoted Text and Interpretation; Is There Always a Correspondence?

When working with quotations from the Old Testament in the New, the correspondence between a quoted text and its interpretation can in some cases be very hard to comprehend. Mostly, this difficulty is due to the fact that we, of course, cannot know what was in the mind of the interpreter. However, in a few cases the quoted text is extant in various forms, and occasionally one of the variant readings seems to fit the interpretation better than the one found in the actual quotation. The question arises, if perhaps the interpreter had another version of the text in mind from the one quoted, when he made his interpretation. In Qumran there are some well-known examples, where this might be the case. This is also true for some interpretations in the Midrashim and in the early Church Fathers. But what about the New Testament? Are there any such examples in the New Testament, where the quoted text is not the text in the mind of the interpreter, i.e., the author of the New Testament text? And what could possibly be the reason for quoting one version of a text and presenting an interpretation of a different one?

Hans Lammers: The Textual Form of the Quotation from Isaiah 6,10 in Mark 4,12: Influence from a Targumic Tradition or an Example of Inner-Gospel Exegesis?

In the Gospel of Mark we encounter some 25 quotations from the Old Testament. An analysis of the textual form of all of these quotations shows that most of these depend on the LXX. In addition, the textual form of only a few quotations agrees verbatim with any of the extant LXX versions of the passage quoted. In some instances, we find a difference in textual form not accounted for by any OT version of the passage quoted which at the same time does result in a shift of meaning (e.g. Isaiah 6,10 in Mark 4,12; Isa 29,13 in Mark 7,7; Exod 20,17/Deut 5,21 in Mark 10,19; Zech 13,7 in Mark 14,27. In this paper, I will address one of these quotations, that of Isaiah 6,10 in Mark 4,12. Whereas there are several indications that the textual form of the quotation of Isaiah 6,9-10 in Mark 4,12 is dependent upon the LXX, the final clause exhibits a deviation not accounted for by any extant version of the LXX nor by the Hebrew of the MT. Several scholars have explained Mark’s textual form here (ἀφεθῇ αὐτοῖς) as dependent upon a tradition which eventually ended up in Targum Jonathan. Yet, Mark’s καὶ ἀφεθῇ αὐτοῖς as an interpretation of the LXX’s καὶ ἰάσομαι αὐτούς fits the narrative context remarkably well. Mark’s deviant textual form may therefore be due to influence from the narrative context, and present an example of what I call ‘inner-gospel exegesis’. Specifically, I will analyze the preceding unit 3,20-35 as part of the larger literary section 3,7 – 4,34 and show how the issue of not receiving forgiveness is linked to important characters: the scribes from Jerusalem (3,22) and Jesus’s relatives (3,20-21). Both are of the opinion that Jesus’ ministry of healing and exorcism is the result of his being possessed by an unclean spirit (3,30). This opinion is designated as blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, an offense that will never be forgiven (3,29-30). According to the Markan narrator, this rejection to acknowledge Jesus’ ministry as driven by the Holy Spirit places the scribes and Jesus’s relatives outside the ‘family’ of Jesus-followers (3,30-35). It is to ‘those outside’ that the quotation of Isaiah 6,10 is applied in a form deviating from the LXX but fitting the context perfectly. At the end of my contribution, I will present a tentative answer to the question whether Mark’s deviant textual form of Isaiah 6,10 is due to inner-gospel exegesis or that his view of Jesus’ ministry is best understood as a midrash on the deviant targumic rendition of this biblical passage. My answer is that we have here an example of ‘inner-gospel exegesis’. I will propose that in the other instances in Mark where we meet a variant textual form of an OT quotation but cannot explain it by referring to extant OT versions, we may be faced with the same phenomenon.

Nationaler ökumenischer Gedenk- und Feiertag

Programm
ab 9.30: Reformiertes Kirchenzentrum, Saal
Kaffee und Gipfeli
Die Cafeteria bleibt den ganzen Tag als Begegnungsort geöffnet.

10.30 – 11.30: Reformierte Kirche
Vortrag: «Nimm alles von mir, was mich hindert zu dir. Was Bruder Klaus und die Reformation verbindet» Josef Lang, Historiker, Bern
Musik: Alois Hugener, Horn/Alphorn

ab 11.30 – 13.00: Reformiertes Kirchenzentrum
Suppenessen: Kappeler Milchsuppe

12.00 – 12.20: Reformierte Kirche
Mittagsgebet Pfr. Andreas Haas, Gemeindeleiter Bernd Lenfers

13.00 – 14.15: Reformierte Kirche
Podiumsgespräch: «Wie (be-)finden wir uns gemeinsam auf dem Weg zur Mitte?» mit Eva-Maria Faber, Prof. für Dogmatik und Fundamentaltheologie TH Chur, Gottfried Locher, Präsident des Rates SEK und + Charles Morerod, Präsident SBK, Hansruedi Vetsch, Präsident Stiftung Bruderklausen-Kapelle Frauenfeld
Moderation: Brigitta Rotach, Haus der Religionen Bern

13.15 – 14.15: Reformiertes Kirchenzentrum
Projektvorstellung «Die Schweiz in Wittenberg»: Zwei ökumenische Projekte im Rahmen der Weltausstellung Reformation 2017 «Tore der Freiheit»:
Bereichstor «Ökumene und Religion»: Jo Achermann, Prof. für plastisches Gestalten BTU Cottbus (Berlin/Kerns)
Pavillon «Prophezei» des SEK und der SBK: Gabriel de Montmollin und Serge Fornerod, SEK (Bern)

14.30 – 15.30: Reformierte Kirche
Referat und Gespräch: «Ein Gutes ergibt stets das andere – Zeuginnen am Abend vor und während der Schweizer Reformation» Rebecca Giselbrecht, Dozentin in praktischer Theologie, Universität Zürich

15.00 – 15.40: Kirche St. Oswald
Musikalische Feierstunde zum Hören und Mitsingen Kammerchor der Zuger Kantorei und St. Johannes-Chor (Ltg. Johannes Meister), Kirchenchor Baar-Steinhausen (Ltg. Christian Renggli); Orgel: Martin Völlinger

16.00 – 17.30: Kirche St. Michael
Ökumenischer Gottesdienst «Gemeinsam zur Mitte» mit Gottfried Locher, Präsident des Rates SEK und Felix Gmür, Bischof von Basel

Uraufführung der Kantate «Gemeinsam zur Mitte» von Erwin Mattmann mit dem Ensemble Ardent Bern (Ltg. Patrick Secchiari); Orgel: Carl Rütti (Kantate), Martin Völlinger

Anschliessend Apéro riche im Pfarreiheim St. Michael

Via

Call for Papers: From Reformation to Reformations

Amsterdam, 20 September 2017, conference From Reformation to Reformations: On Analogies, Ideals and Ideas. This conference will seek to contribute to the developing field of cross-cultural religious and cultural studies by analyzing the cultural, political and linguistic uses of the “Reformation” in the modern era, from circa 1800 until the present day.

It will investigate how and why modern movements, intellectuals and politicians referred to the “Reformation” as historical event, process, or principle. It will highlight how in modernity, ‘Reformation’ oscillated between a static, historic definition on the one hand, and a dynamic and subjective interpretation on the other. The focus of this conference will be primarily on (post-)modern uses of the term ‘Reformation’ outside the strict context of Protestant theology, but in various other religious traditions and societies.

Go for more information to the website or the pdf.

Via.