Samson and the Lion

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Just because I love Dürer’s work and who doesn’t want to see a dude kill a lion with his bare hands?  I bet this one was #CecilTheLion’s ancestor.  Cecil seems to have drawn an unlucky straw…

durer_samson

[NB- all the Cecil talk has made me surly].

Well There Ya Go: Claims of Discovery Have Now Replaced Actual Discoveries…

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Egypt’s Antiquities Ministry announced this morning that a team of underwater archaeologists had discovered that remains of a large Egyptian army from the 14th century BC, at the bottom of the Gulf of Suez, 1.5 kilometers offshore from the modern city of Ras Gharib. The team was searching for the remains of ancient ships and artifacts related to Stone Age and Bronze Age trade in the Red Sea area, when they stumbled upon a gigantic mass of human bones darkened by age.

The scientists lead by Professor Abdel Muhammad Gader and associated with Cairo University’s Faculty of Archaeology, have already recovered a total of more than 400 different skeletons, as well as hundreds of weapons and pieces of armor, also the remains of two war chariots, scattered over an area of approximately 200 square meters. They estimate that more than 5000 other bodies could be dispersed over a wider area, suggesting that an army of large size who have perished on the site.

Mmmm hmmmm……  And the original source of the unproven claim is the ‘WorldNewsDailyReport’ website… which is something like the National Enquirer.

A Clutch of Carnivals

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Jim:

Clutching Carnivals.

Originally posted on Newman Research Centre for the Bible and its Reception:

Once again it is carnival time in the land of biblical studies! This month, Lindsay Kennedy does the honours by hosting the July Biblical Studies Carnival on his My Digital Seminary blog.

I’ve been particularly busy during the past month (yes, I do have to actually do some work from time to time) and this is when the carnivals really come into their own. Lindsay has divided the post into three subsections: News and Events, Reviews and Posts and Media/Podcasts. Each section offers a wide selection of offerings. As might be expected the responses to the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife makes an appearance as well as a link to the New Testament Studies special issue which was devoted to it.

One issue that I think will be receiving greater attention over the coming months/years relates to the question of a (very) early high Christology. Larry Hurtado’s work (a summary of his…

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Should Pastors Leave If There’s A Risk of Illness?

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During the plague of 1527 Luther wrote

Those who are engaged in a spiritual ministry such as preachers and pastors must likewise remain steadfast before the peril of death. We have a plain command from Christ, “A good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep but the hireling sees the wolf coming and flees” [John 10:11]. For when people are dying, they most need a spiritual ministry which strengthens and comforts their consciences by word and sacrament and in faith overcomes death. However, where enough preachers are available in one locality and they agree to encourage the other clergy to leave in order not to expose themselves needlessly to danger, I do not consider such conduct sinful because spiritual services are provided for and because they would have been ready and willing to stay if it had been necessary. We read that St. Athanasius fled from his church that his life might be spared because many others were there to administer his office. Similarly, the brethren in Damascus lowered Paul in a basket over the wall to make it possible for him to escape, Acts 9 [:25]. And also in Acts 19 [:30] Paul allowed himself to be kept from risking danger in the marketplace because it was not essential for him to do so.

Seems right to me.

You Asked and Asked, Now It’s Coming: A Septuagint Reader

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Jim:

Fun.

Originally posted on Words on the Word:

LXX decalOn the one hand, the burgeoning field of Septuagint studies still has few enough publications that any new work is potentially significant. On the other hand, there still seems to be an acute need for works that bridge the gap between New Testament Greek readers and LXX specialists.

Resources like †Rod Decker’s Koine Greek Reader (which pays decent attention to the Septuagint) or even the old Conybeare and Stock (which has some LXX portions with explanatory footnotes) are few and far between.

I’ve been asking Kregel for probably three years now whether they’d consider publishing a dedicated Septuagint reader. Little did I know one was already in the works.

It releases this fall. Karen Jobes is its author. Here’s some copy from Kregel that describes the book:

Interest in the Septuagint today is strong and continues to grow. But a guidebook to the text, similar to readers and handbooks that exist for students of…

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The Death of S.M. Jackson

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jacksonSamuel Macauley Jackson, 1851–1912, American Presbyterian clergyman and encyclopedist, b. New York City. He was associate editor in the preparation of the original Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia (1884) and editor in chief of the greatly enlarged New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge (13 vol., 1908–14). He also edited the Concise Dictionary of Religious Knowledge (rev. ed. 1891) and the “American Church History” series (13 vol., 1893–97). Jackson was religious editor of several encyclopedias and dictionaries. He wrote a standard biography of Huldreich Zwingli (1901), part of the “Heroes of the Reformation” series, which he sponsored. He was long the moving spirit of the American Society of Church History and edited its papers.

This is the anniversary of his death.  He was one of the greats.

The Resignation of Heinrich Bullinger

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bullinger4On the 2nd of August in 1575 Heinrich Bullinger resigned his position as Pastor of the Great Minster in Zurich.  He had served the City since 1531 when Zwingli had been viciously murdered by the Catholic troops at Kappel-am-Albis (where, incidentally, Bullinger had served the Church prior to his move to Zurich).  Unfortunately, Bullinger’s ‘retirement’ was short lived.  He died the same year.

Philip Schaff writes

His last days were clouded, like those of many faithful servants of God. The excess of work and care undermined his health. In 1562 he wrote to Fabricius at Coire: “I almost sink under the load of business and care, and feel so tired that I would ask the Lord to give me rest if it were not against his will.”

The pestilence of 1564 and 1565 brought him to the brink of the grave, and deprived him of his wife, three daughters, and his brother-in-law. He bore these heavy strokes with Christian resignation. In the same two fatal years he lost his dearest friends, Calvin, Blaurer, Gessner, Froschauer, Bibliander, Fabricius, Farel. He recovered, and was allowed to spend several more years in the service of Christ. His youngest daughter, Dorothea, took faithful and tender care of his health. He felt lonely and homesick, but continued to preach and to write with the aid of pastor Lavater, his colleague and son-in-law.

He preached his last sermon on Pentecost, 1575. He assembled, Aug. 26, all the pastors of the city and professors of theology around his sick-bed, assured them of his perseverance in the true apostolic and orthodox doctrine, recited the Apostles’ Creed, and exhorted them to purity of life, harmony among themselves, and obedience to the magistrates. He warned them against intemperance, envy, and hatred, thanked them for their kindness, assured them of his love, and closed with a prayer of thanksgiving and some verses of the hymns of Prudentius. Then he took each by the hand and took leave of them with tears, as Paul did from the elders at Ephesus.

A few weeks afterwards he died, after reciting several Psalms (51, 16, and 42), the Lord’s Prayer, and other prayers, peacefully, in the presence of his family, Sept. 17, 1575. He was buried in the Great Minster, at the side of his beloved wife and his dear friend, Peter Martyr. According to his wish, Rudolph Gwalter, Zwingli’s son-in-law and his [that is, Bullinger’s] adopted son, was unanimously elected his successor. Four of his successors were trained under his care and labored in his spirit.