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The Incredibly Hot June Biblical Studies Carnival, Including Lots of Scandal Because of an Unprovenanced Manuscript…

Hot Hebrew Bible / Old Testament Posts

Ayrton da Silva mentions Hosea and an article on Hosea 4-14.  Who doesn’t love Hosea?

The fear of God is the subject of this posting over at B&I.  Acknowledging the linguistic and geographical breadth of comparable terminology is a good starting point for seeing how this conception of “fear” does, and does not, overlap with the conception of “fear” that modern readers may bring to ancient texts. These terms from antiquity can and do indicate a feeling of fear. Yet they regularly go beyond feelings, and they convey a conception of feelings per se in ways that reveal taxonomical challenges.

Who were the Patriarchs?  Michael Langlois has the answer.  Or, does he?  😉

Father’s Day is observed in June.  Christian Brady is a person who observes about Father’s day.  Is it coincidence?  It seems not.  So what that it’s a post from 2016.  He reposted it this month and so it’s fair game for carnivalizing.

Is water wet?  Is the Pope Catholic?  Is NT Wright publishing a book this week?  Is Mike Bird?  Do you even have to ask?

Bart Ehrman has a post on the OT and the early Church that may whet your appetite enough to join his network so you can see the whole thing.  I’d join up myself but to be honest all of my income goes on books, food, and clothes.  And food and clothes only if I have a little left over from book buying.

ANEE is looking for a doctoral candidate.  If you’re studying the Hebrew Bible and other ancient Near Eastern kinds of things and you’re interested in living in Scandinavia for awhile, you should apply, thou lowly undergrad.

Tavis has apparently been having interactions with Marcionites (or Andy Stanley- but I repeat myself) as he feels compelled to mention the fact that it’s ok to preach from the Old Testament.  Why yes, Tavis, it is.  It always has been.

Apparently Lego contests don’t like depictions of biblical scenes of violence.  Who knew…  Deane has the story.

A new volume in the ‘Alexandrian Bible’ is out.  William *The Septuagintialist* Ross shares the fun facts.

Has God cursed the earth?  Is climate change a result?  Here’s a post on the topic.

Ian Paul wonders if the Bible is clear about marriage.  Or anything.  Interesting question, isn’t it.

Hot New Testament Posts

James Tabor is following discussions concerning the Last Supper and the Passover and has some cogent points to make.  Mike Aubrey is on a tear about verbal aspect theory.  Apparently he doesn’t like Aktionsart as well.  What has the world come to?  What next, no Santa?  No Easter Bunny?

Joan Taylor gave a brief talk up in Canada about Jesus.  You can watch the YouTube video here.  It’s only around 25 minutes, so even thouse with tiny attention spans should be able to manage it.  And it’s very good.

James Tabor had some thoughts on the ‘virgin birth‘.

Gary Greenberg has some thoughts about the parable of the wicked tenant.  Give it a read.

So called ‘First Century’ Mark has returned…  blerg.  It is worth noting that the Green Collection, though having received title to the fragments (see point 10 of the purchase agreement), never took physical possession of the fragments. Instead, in accordance with other terms of the agreement (see points 10.1-10.2) the fragments were left in Obbink’s custody for research and publication (the intended venue of initial publication being specified in 10.3).  You’ll have to read the post and its attachments to figure out what all that is supposed to mean.  Blerg.

Larry Hurtado writes in connection with the scandal (this is as close to scandal as scholarship gets, unless you count Richard Pervo…):  This new evidence is personally dismaying, as it raises questions about the actions of Obbink, in whom I placed trust earlier (as in my blog posting here).  It now appears that my confidence may have been misplaced.  In a comment on Nongbri’s posting  [NB- It’s actually a comment on Elijah Hixson’s post, not Nongbri’s][JW], Peter Head says these developments now make me and Ehrman look “stupid”.  I’m not clear how he reached that judgment.  I may have been mistaken in my trust in Obbink, but trusting someone until there is reason to think otherwise is hardly stupid, Peter.  Also chiming in is Elijah Hixson over on ETC.  Enjoy the comments there too.

But the best analysis of the whole debacle is by Bart Ehrman.  His take is here.  And his response to demonstrably false claims and statements is here.

And then there’s this analysis of the receipt for the documents.  Gonzo work!  This first century (not) Mark thing will be made into a mystery film before long.  I suggest ‘On the Trail of Mark: Fraud for Profit’…

But if you want a more Obbink friendly take on the whole thing, don’t worry.  There’s this guy.  He seems to think the whole thing is a setup….  And Larry Hurtado thinks the fragment probative.  Allow me to remind you, however, that it is unprovenanced.

And, finally, as the month drew to a close, this shows up in Christianity Today.  What a bunch of shady characters doing shady things.  And worst of all, they knew they were.

Whew… That’s a lot of talk about an unprovenanced trinket.  Hey, you know how these problems and scandals can be avoided in the future?  Scholars can decide to have NOTHING to do with anything unprovenanced!  ‘Oh, hey Bob, you have a trinket you think is ancient and you want me to stake my reputation on it but you got it from some dude in a back alley?  Nah, hard pass, dude.  You go ruin your reputation, I think I’ll keep mine’.

On a happier topic- there’s, according to the title, a post about Paul here.  But I have to be honest, I didn’t read it.  Not because I didn’t want to, but because it’s a Patheos blog and I couldn’t actually find the post amidst all the pop up ads and advertisements on the page.  Or, I did find it, and Paul had hemorrhoid issues and a very bad case of eczema.  I hope you can hack through the weeds and find the fruit.

Joan Taylor was interviewed.  That’s always worth watching.

J.M. asks ‘what did Jesus learn from Mary of Bethany?’  Nothing so far as the NT is concerned, but that doesn’t at all hinder the speculation and the need of many to make women more and more prominent in the early Church, thus rendering history falsely and misrepresenting the facts.  But hey, there are ideological points to make.  So texts must be violated.  If trends continue, Jesus will soon himself be declared a woman.

Speaking of Mary and Martha… a Duke U scholar has discovered textual evidence of the practice of some scribes to remove mention of them.  It’s a fascinating report.

Nijay Gupta has a series of 16 posts on the topic of Women in Ministry.  Definitely worth taking a look at.  It’s a hot topic these days, along with complementarianism and egalitarianism and such things.  Women are big news, it seems.  It reminds me of what Paul wrote to the Galatians-  There can be neither Jew nor Greek, there can be neither slave nor freeman, there can be neither male nor female — for you are all one in Christ Jesus. (Gal. 3:28)

Larry Hurtado has some thoughts on scribal harmonizations.  Can’t we all just get along?  And then he goes on to talk about scribal changes, which he views as mostly intentional reader’s adjustments to texts.   Hmmmm……..   It seems progressives were at work centuries ago, adjusting texts to suit their views……  And Larry also has some thoughts on the baby Jesus in artistic representations… and whether he’s Jewish (baby Jesus that is, not Larry).

Speaking of texts- over at ETC they have mentioned a series available from de Gruyter and concerned with texts and textual studies.

What happens when a publisher of ANE texts and related books posts on the Letter of James?  This does…

Stephen Carlson made a rare guest appearance on Bart Ehrman’s blog!  It’s like sighting a Yeti, a UFO, and an intelligent and honest politician all on the same day!!!!   Oh and he talks about Mark.  Or something.

Q.  Steve Wiggins.  Q.

Michael Kok on pseudonymity.  At least he says he’s Michael.

Hot Archaeology Posts

Sarah Bond posted a gem about museum exhibitions.  It includes – These are just a few of the colorful objects that caught my eye in this luscious exhibition. There is is no doubt that there are problems of provenance and museum acquisition glimpsed at within World Between Empires; a fact noted by Press in his Hyperallergic review. But there is also a potent message to visitors throughout, one which asks viewers to consider the impact of the looting of cultural heritage today in places like Iran, Iraq, and Palmyra.

Michael Langlois posted on the Norwegian ‘Lying Pen of Scribes’ folk and their work.  In case you haven’t heard of it-  “The Lying Pen of Scribes” is the name of a new research project led by my Norwegian colleague Årstein Justnes.  The title comes from the biblical Book of Jeremiah, chapter 8 verse 8. The idea was born after I suspected the presence of modern forgeries in the Schøyen collection of Dead Sea Scrolls. Our international core team—Torleif Elgvin, Årstein Justnes, Kipp Davis, Ira Rabin and myself—conducted additional research, which confirmed my suspicions. Etc.

John the Baptist died.  In fact, he was killed.  And stuff from where he was killed has been brought to light.  And Chris Rollston is involved with deciphering it.  And that means that whatever comes to light will be reliable and accurately described.  Because Chris is a true scholar.

A new project regarding stamp seals in the southern Levant has been announced by Ido Koch.  Take a look.

Jodi Magness’s work on Masada is discussed here.  It’s also a book review.  But since it’s both, I’ve posted it here, on the cusp of the book review section.  You’re welcome.

Hot Book Posts

First off- if you are a fan of open access books in religion, there’s a new twitter account to follow.  Announced here.

Heather Thiessen blogged a review of a book on Judges. It’s a good review and hers is a delightful blog.  If you aren’t familiar, you should most definitely check it out.  I don’t know if she is related to Gerd Thiessen but if she is, it would make me UNNATURALLY and GLORIOUSLY happy.

Bart Ehrman has a book in preparation and a couple of book ideas percolating.  And he discusses them here.  Hartmut Leppin wrote a book on the Early Church.  It’s reviewed here.  You’ll find it quite enjoyable.

A new volume on the Psalms is available, in Open Access, by V&R.  Give it a look, and see if it’s something you’d like to read.

I don’t want to be one of ‘those’ people, but I reviewed John Barton’s new book.  It’s wonderful.  And so is the book!  😉

Bird reviews deSilva on Galatians.  MB remarks I’ve finally been able to read over David A. deSilva’s long-awaited Galatians commentary in the NICNT series and it is definitely one to put on your shelf. The commentary is characterized by deSilva’s eye for exegetical details, historical investigation, interest in background, and awareness of socio-cultural factors.   Yes, but what does he say about the ‘if cutting off a little helps, hack the whole thing off’ bit????  Inquiring minds…

Anthony Royal reviews a book on Paul’s use of the Old Testament in Romans.  It’s a nice review and the book looks very interesting.

The Coptic Dictionary (Berlin U. project) is online.  “The “Database and Dictionary of Greek Loanwords in Coptic” (DDGLC, Freie Universität Berlin), the research project “Strukturen und Transformationen des Wortschatzes der ägyptischen Sprache ”Thesaurus Linguae Aegyptiae” (TLA, Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften) and “Coptic Scriptorium: Digital Research in Coptic Language and Literature” are happy to announce the release of version 1 of the “Comprehensive Coptic Lexicon“.”

Andrew Judd reviewed a book introducing the Hebrew Scriptures.  An Introduction to the Scriptures of Israel.  An Introduction to the Scriptures of Israel offers a fresh way in to the Hebrew Bible as a work of literature and theology.  Says the reviewer.  Fresh.  Or as the kids say it, Phresh.

Scot McKnight has a fantastic post on bible translation tribalism.  It’s witty and humorous and if you missed it, don’t miss it today.

Bible Gateway did an interview with a chap who wrote a book on the bigness of God.  It’s big.

Rick Wadholm reviewed a book about the antichrist.  Enjoy it, if you dare.

Larry Hurtado wrote the world’s shortest (so far) book review.  David Allen’s recent study of the appropriation and influence of OT texts on NT references to Jesus’ death is very much worth noting:  According to the Scriptures:  The Death of Christ in the Old Testament and the New (SCM Press, 2018).  I’ve just finished a short review of the book for Expository Times, and I can commend it.   I don’t know if that means he can commend the book or his review of the book.

Ian Paul excerpts bits of a book review by Mike Bird on transgender children.  Talk about a hot subject… it’s sure to engender loads of angry, letter-writing-campaign-generating discussion.

Hot Miscellaneous Posts

James McGrath made mention of the 20th anniversary of ‘The Matrix’ and reminisced about the title of his own blog in its first incarnation.  James is still worth following as he continues to explore the matrix we all inhabit.  Michael Langlois discusses the events of the intertestamental period.  By the by, if you want to know anything about the Scrolls or epigraphy Michael is your guy.

Helen Bond offered some thoughts on Mary Beard’s Gifford Lectures.  A must read.

Travis Bohlinger is at Cambridge for the Tyndale House conference and he’s posted some super photos that make me wish I were back in Cambridge right now.  I guess I will just have to pine and long for it till I get to return in January for SOTS.

James Crossley’s lecture from down in Australia is online.  It’s about English people and the Bible.  Loads of fun.

Christian Brady reminds us that the hard right has no interest in faith- it simply sees faith as a means of manipulation.  Give his post a read.  It’s quite timely.

Roberta Mazza has a post about Josh McDowell and his co-conspirator’s Russian appearance.  My favourite duo, Scott Carroll and Josh McDowell, is still around; this time, they went to Russia pretending as usual to be manuscript experts. Incredible as it may seem, there are people happy to join their show. 

🙂

The First Jewish Studies Society Conference is ongoing at this very moment.  ML has the deets.  The 411.  The skinny.

Charlotte Hempel talks about the job of journal editing.  It’s a behind the scenes description.

There will be a digital papyrology workshop in Parma in 2020.  Details here.

Oh Larry… no.  Just no…  We don’t encourage people to visit ‘wikepedia’ or wikipedia.  In a number of publications over the last several years, scholars have drawn attention to the ground-breaking work of several early scholars who date from the late second through the early fourth centuries AD.  In particular, the massive and innovative projects of Origen (ca. 184-253 AD) are noteworthy (see, e.g., the lengthy entry on him in Wikepedia here).  Nor do we encourage appreciation for Origen, who, according to the blessed Saint Jerome, is the chief of all heretics.   No, Larry.  Bad Larry.  Bad.

Spend a bit of time reading the Newman Research Blog’s 30 days of biblical wildness.  There’s a post for each day of June on an aspect of wildlife and environmentalism.

Steve Walton wants to help you be a better writer.  So, to that end, he has uploaded slides he used at a writing workshop that may be of interest to you.

Claude kicked off the month with his hosted Carnival.  Take a look if you missed it earlier.

***

Well friends seeking relief from the oppressive heat of summer- thanks for stopping by.  And look for the next Carnival in about a month.  And if so inclined, host one yourself.  They are a lot of fun.  As Phil ‘the Host’ Long writes

If you are a new blogger, a graduate student or established scholar who is actively blogging, I would love to have you host a future carnival.

As you can see there is no one for the rest of the year (September through December are wide open). I have a few asks out there, but there is still time for you to volunteer as Carnival Host. Hosting the carnival is a great way to draw attention to your work, so consider hosting in the near future.

Seriously….PLEASE email me  (plong42 at gmail.com) or direct message on Twitter (@plong42) to volunteer. You can also leave a comment here with your contact info and I will get back to you.

You can also review older carnivals by browsing this tag. Follow me on twitter (@plong42) if you are into that sort of thing. I have a Biblical Studies magazine on Flipboard, an essential app for your iOS device. I use it on my iPad for news and other special interests (including biblioblogs).

 
Comments Off on The Incredibly Hot June Biblical Studies Carnival, Including Lots of Scandal Because of an Unprovenanced Manuscript…

Posted by on 1 Jul 2019 in Archaeology, Bible, Biblical Studies Carnival, Books

 

Call For Submissions: The June Carnival (Posting 1 July)

Send along your suggestions.  The deadline is just a couple of hours off, so please send them along.

 
Comments Off on Call For Submissions: The June Carnival (Posting 1 July)

Posted by on 30 Jun 2019 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

Call For Submissions

The June Biblical Studies Carnival (posting 1 July) will be hosted by yours truly.  If you see a post in any of the following categories, please do pass them along:

  • Hebrew Bible
  • New Testament
  • Archaeology
  • Textual Criticism
  • Books
  • Miscellaneous Things

Thanks, in advance.

 
Comments Off on Call For Submissions

Posted by on 27 Jun 2019 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

The Latest Biblical Studies Carnival

Christopher Scott has it.

 
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Posted by on 2 May 2019 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

A Really Delightful Biblical Studies Carnival

Nicely done, Mr Milkman.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on 1 Apr 2019 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

One Carnival to Rule them All: January, 2019

Introductory Matters

January is always an exciting month.  It kicks off a new year and it begins with a celebration of the greatest of all the Christian theologians and exegetes, Huldrych Zwingli.  But, believe it or not, I’m not going to talk about Zwingli.  Or Luther.  Or Calvin.  Or any of that historical theology stuff.  Instead, this Carnival is restricted to things biblical studies.  So hold on to your knickers, friends, because this Carnival is the One Biblical Studies Carnival to Rule Them All.

Hebrew Bible/ Old Testament

Science and Bible, again.  And yes, I realize that it’s a topic near and dear to many but I just don’t get it.  Science has to do with science and Scripture has to do with theology/ metaphysics.  They don’t play on the same playground, they aren’t neighbors, and they don’t sit down for coffee and chat about what they think about the other.  You never really hear about scientists fretting as to whether or not Christian theology will take it seriously but you have loads of Christian theologians who act like 13 year old girls craving the approval of the boy who won’t pay them any attention.   Nonetheless, if the whole science game is your bag, good for you.  You are Legion.

Archangels.  Where did they come from?  The remaining giants discuss.

Where did archangels come from? How did we end up with archangels in Jewish and Christian tradition?

Find out.

The LXX Reader’s Edition contest that ran in November… has announced the two winners…  here at the end of January (the 25th to be precise).  (3 months.  That has to be a record)(Bless their hearts)(They have political careers ahead of them if this LXX research thing falls through).

Someone wants to argue with Deane Galbraith about giants.

Over at Bible and Interpretation

Hendel and Joosten’s book  [on dating Biblical texts in Hebrew] is chock-full of insightful observations on a multitude of linguistic, textual, and cultural/historical phenomena, and they argue cogently that the best method for dating biblical writings should include all three of these data sources. Nonetheless, their answer to the question, “How Old is the Hebrew Bible?,” is unoriginal because they do little more than offer a sophisticated repackaging of the traditional linguistic dating approach and results, and it is also unsatisfactory because they eschew literary criticism in the formulation of their model of consilience for determining the ages of biblical literature.

Read the full essay.

Septuagint reading can be fun.  Or so we’re told.

There’s a super essay in B&I by Hendel and Joosten on the Hebrew Bible’s age.  You MUST read it (or else).

Many scholars, largely disregarding linguistic data, insist that most or all of the Hebrew Bible was written in the second half of the first millennium BCE, during the Persian and/or Hellenistic periods, and draw the inference that there is little or no historical content that predates this era….The ages of the books of the Hebrew Bible span a vast chronological range, from the early Iron Age to the Greek age, which we can discern at different degrees of focus. There is much that we can know about these topics, more than most scholars are willing to grant.

Oh boy.

Internet Monk is thinking along with Peter Enns about the Bible.  A bad decision on the best of days.  But anyway, he’s doing it.  And you may to give his thinkings a read.

Robert Alter’s really wonderful translation/ commentary on the Hebrew Bible gets a thorough going over in this ‘symposium’ on it in the Jewish Review of Books.  It is a substantial review by a good raft of scholars, and you should most definitely read it.  I was given a copy of Alter’s work for Christmas and I really love it.

Septuagint Summer School.  You know you want to.  It’s in the Summer.  In Europe.

New Testament

An Orthodox Priest named Stephen has a very interesting take on Jesus and social justice.  He opines

Secularism is the forgetting of God, or remembering Him in a manner that is truly less than God. This is the cause of all injustice. Indeed, it is the great injustice: that human beings forget their Creator and the purpose of their existence. When we forget God, everything is madness.

I recommend his intriguing essay.

Joel Watts tells us how the New Testament canon was actually formed.  Who knew…

Larry’s right.  Paul wasn’t ‘converted’.   He simply reformed.

Bill Mounce asks if ‘all’ the translations are wrong at Mark 1:16.  To which I reply, the ones most people use are, but the REB is right.  The REB proves itself over and over again the most reliable version in English and here it does so yet again.

Ian Paul discusses, naturally, the historicity of the visit of the Wise Men.  What the world needs is more Bultmannians.

Ian also talks about the notion that the Gospel can be funny at spots…  He’s apparently writing a book on the humor in the Bible….  But he’s British…

Philbert *The Traveler* Long had a bit of something to say about the Theology of Acts.  He remarks

There is a third element of the book of Acts which…

Bart Ehrman asks about early Christians and the belief in reincarnation.  He writes

It is often said today that reincarnation was a widespread teaching in early Christianity as well.  In fact, the evidence for it is ….     To see the rest of what I have to say, you’ll need to belong to the blog.  It’s easy to join, and costs less then fifty cents a week.

I don’t know what he says about it.  I’m not a blog-liever.  If you are, you’ll know.

James McGrath thinks Jesus was a hugger.  It’s an interesting and not altogether impossible reading of the text he is looking at.  Why not, I guess.  But Jesus also had a beard and there’s no reason to think that having a beard is required just because he had one…  ergo…

Richard Bauckham lectured at the Ecole Biblique in Jerusalem on Jesus Christ as the Alpha and Omega.  You’ll enjoy it.

Bart Ehrman answers a reader’s question about the Jewishness of the New Testament authors.  Someone (the questioner) has been reading the Nazi sympathizing New Testament scholars in Germany in 1930 again…  Fortunately Deane has the good sense (along with many others) to point out the absurdity of it all (and Bart pulled his post down… but you can still read it here).

Mike Bird writes a thing about ‘Apostle Paul’ and some early Church person thing.  What intrigues me about the post is the practice among some of saying ‘Apostle Paul’ instead of ‘The Apostle Paul’ as though ‘the’ is now out of fashion.  It’s weird.  Stop it.

And, finally, your ‘eyeroll of the month’- a post suggesting that the Sermon on the Mount has a dark side because it ‘others’ the pharisees….

This means the Sermon on the Mount is, in large part, constructed upon a negative “othering,” or stereotyping of rivals – namely, the Scribes and the Pharisees. The “righteousness” of the Scribes and Pharisees provides a foil for the higher righteousness of the Sermon.

Archaeology and Texts

Two biblioblogs took notice of the appearance of a website devoted to the polyglots:  Bible and Tech and ETC.  Who doesn’t like polyglots?  And websites?  And polyglot websites?

If you haven’t run across mention of it yet, there’s a Text criticism conference in Birmingham.  Bookings close in mid February.

Belarus text display?  Ok.  I guess a text has got to be somewhere.  Why not Belarus?  Though if I were a text I’d definitely prefer to be in the Zurich Central Library.  Or the British Library.

ETC also took notice of some dead sea scrolls stuffity stuff.  It’s madness though so you should probably just let is slide right on by.   Here’s a snippet just so you know I’m trying to be a blessing:

The texts preserving Psalms from Qumran classified by scholars as biblical texts are significant for the fluid/standard text debate because they preserve large-scale differences that designate them in the mind of many scholars as an alternative tradition or edition of the Psalter.

I hope they get Denzel Washington to play the lead when they make this DSS post at ETC into a movie…

Big news from Brent– the John Rylands texts are online.  Now that’s some useful material for sure.

Israeli looters want to beat Bedouin looters to the loot to be found, they hope, in the region of the Dead Sea around Qumran.  Looting Wars should be the title of the essay here reported.  One set of looters is state sponsored and the other individually driven.  But looters are looters.  if it isn’t your land, it isn’t your loot.

Interested in a digital library of text critical things?  Look no further.

At the time of writing this, we currently have images of or links to more than 1500 manuscripts in our library.

Aren Maeir has a new post on the Philistines and their war-y-ness-hood.  It’s a lot of fun.  The post, not the war-ness-ness of the Philistines.  They were such Philistines.

Michael Langlois lectured at the Ecole Biblique on bible forgeries and the like and it was recorded.  You can view it here.

Bob Cargill wrote a piece for BAR on the so called ‘Jerusalem Column’, noting

The Jerusalem Column is the first inscription from the Second Temple period where the full spelling of the Hebrew name of Jerusalem (ירושלימ) appears. By “full spelling,” I mean a spelling of Jerusalem that includes the letter yod (י) between the lamed (“l”; ל) and final mem (“m”; מ) at the end of the name.

Unfortunately he doesn’t actually use a ‘final mem’, as the article suggests, but a medial mem.  Final mem looks like this: ם.  Not like this: מ.  If BC just meant that the word on the inscription ended with mem that’s what he should have said, without calling it a ‘final mem’ because the two mean different things to people who study Hebrew texts. BAR’s readers won’t notice the difference, but there is one.

Be sure to give the lecture by Israel Finkelstein at the Ecole Biblique a watch if you haven’t already.  It’s way more fun than a pillar.

Important series-es for new testament textual criticism.  Brought to you by the good people of Evangelical Textual Criticism (as opposed to and in contradistinction from non-evangelical textual criticism).

The Nabatean stronghold of Sela gets a great writeup in the Jordan Times, blogged here.  An interesting site with an interesting history.

Paul Barford posted an interesting snippet on Israel’s display of looted archaeological finds.  He notes, though, that

International law bars an occupying military from displaying antiquities outside the occupied area. But (Nir Hasson, ‘Israel Displays Archaeological Finds Looted From West Bank‘ Haaretz Jan 01, 2019). The exhibition is part of the Israeli story invoking the need to preserve culture as a justification of their activities as occupier. Through their media they constantly promote the narrative that archaeological remains in the occupied territory must be ‘saved from’ the Palestinians.

Aren’t they nice to break the law to save artifacts from those awful terrible expansionist Palestinians……  Such humanitarians…

Green papyri.  Again.

Larry Hurtado is thinking about Jesus this month… indeed, something different about Jesus this month…  Be sure to read the whole and don’t cut any of it short.

Books

A new Theology of the Old Testament was reviewed at the very beginning of the month.  It is, seriously, a very good and useful volume.   Rick Brannan announced his writing schedule for 2019.  Have you ever seen such a thing?

Eric Harvey posted a list of books he has read this year.  That may not sound like anything special, until you read the post and realize that these are books for the blind and that there are theological / biblical studies tomes among them.  I suspect that a lot of good could be done if books in biblical studies for the blind were published more purposefully.

Philbert Long reviewed Carl Holladay’s commentary on Acts.  He begins, justifiably:

There have been several significant…

Leander Keck has a book on Inerrancy and the text of the New Testament that gets a mention (I don’t know why) by the ETC folk.  I guess they’re just catching up on book reading.

JB Lightfoot left unfinished his commentaries on several of Paul’s letters.  But he left notes.  Rob Bradshaw has them digitized.  And you can read the notes here.

Someone reviewed a book about following Jesus.  Read it if such things are of interest.  Joel Watts saw a book about Jesus by some Methodist and he was compelled by his Methodist sympathies to make his readers aware of it.

Are you having trouble with translating German?  Tavis Bollinger offers some help if you’re a Logos user.  Or, alternatively, learn German.

James *Not Jim, Don’t Use Jim* Spinti reminds us that editing book covers is just as important as editing book contents.  Otherwise things just look wrong and thus bad.

Larry Hurtado reviews a review of his book.  I’m looking forward to someone reviewing Larry’s review of the review so that then Larry can review the review of the review of his review of his book.

Carl *Hideous* Sweatman shared his reading list from last year.  It’s an interesting mix of bilge, rubbish and a few interesting works.  Send Carl recommendations for stuff that’s worth reading, please.  So that his 2019 can be better than his 2018 was.

Two books are reviewed here having to do with the Bible: Amos, in the Anchor Bible Commentary, and The Jesus Movement in its Expansion.  Scroll down to page 4 of the reviews embedded.

Lexundria.  Books. From antiquity.  Digitized.  Visit it.

Women Biblical Scholars (a blog you should definitely follow) announces the appearance of a monograph on women in Ephesus.  They point it out on the twitter

Dr. Elif Halal Karaman (@elflal) has an exciting new book out on Ephesian women. She tells Women Biblical Scholars (WBS) about it.

Miscellaneous Things

The CenSAMM has announced a conference scheduled for this Summer.  This will be of interest to many.

The 2019 Conference: The Study of Apocalyptic and Millenarian Movements: Critical and Interdisciplinary Approaches will take place on 27-28 June 2019 at the University of Bedfordshire (Bedford Campus).

Mike Bird has a great quote by Thomas Cranmer on abused wives and divorce.  I’m going to use it.  A lot.

Ben Witherington was interviewed by a guy at a Church and Ben is pleased to share the video of Ben’s interview on Ben’s ‘one stop shop for all things biblical and Christian’.  If you’re as into Ben as Ben is, you’ll enjoy Ben’s discussing Ben.

Brian Davidson has some thoughts on Logos 8.  It’s bible software.  For bible nerds.  Who don’t like real books.  But do like e-books.

Rick Brannan is going to send out a newsletter and he wants you to sign up for it.

Christian Brady had some really important things to say about death.  Give it a read.

Michael Satlow is putting together a resource page which assembles digital humanities materials on Judaism in late antiquity:

This is not meant to be comprehensive, but contains a number of sites and links that might be of interest to those interested in working on digital humanities projects relating to Jews and Judaism in (particularly late) antiquity.  I am happy to add and correct this list, so please feel free to send me your suggestions.  Over time, I may well annotate it as well.

The Center for Apocalyptic studies that Crossley runs has assembled a raft of podcasts and videos that may be of interest to persons interested in them.  Such things as one might find interesting.  Potentially.

Animals and the BibleCall for papers.  Check it out.

Dirk remarked on the twitter

ORBIS.  Larry Hurtado mentions it.

ORBIS is primarily intended to serve historians of the Roman Empire, the main questions shaping the project having to do with how Rome managed such a far-flung empire.  So it is “top down” in orientation, more amenable to questions about how trade or governance operated, and at what cost and time involved.

Larry Hurtado has some guidance on what to call people in various international academic contexts.  Give it a look, ye undergrads.

If you are interested in a gathering at Tyndale House, take note of this call for papers:

The 2019 NT Study Group will be meeting at Tyndale House from 26th to 28th June 2018Our theme this year is Writing, orality and the composition of the NT. We would welcome proposals of papers on any issue of scholarly debate on issues relating to this, including writing in ancient world as it affects the NT, memory theory and orality, and canonical composition and dating of NT documents.

Closing Thoughts

Well there it is, the most important official Biblical Studies Carnival of 2019 (so far).  Be sure to go over and grab the Logos free book of the month.  And check out the listing of upcoming Carnivals.

I’ll next be reporting from Zurich where I’m off to attend the Zwingli Conference (celebrating his arrival in Zurich 500 Years Ago) and where there are loads of cool activities planned.  Stay tuned.

 

Last Call for Carnival Submissions

The Biblical Studies Carnival goes live tonight at midnight.  Get your submissions in.  With thanks to the many who already have.

 
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Posted by on 31 Jan 2019 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

Guess What?!?!?!?!

That’s right, the next Biblical Studies Carnival is just around the corner.  Give us your preciousssss possstttessess preciousssssses…..

 
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Posted by on 29 Jan 2019 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

Call for Submissions

Send along links to biblical studies blogs for the next Carnival (covering January, and posting at one minute past midnight on February 1).

 
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Posted by on 25 Jan 2019 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

Call For Submissions

Send along your suggestions for the Biblical Studies Carnival.  It’s going to be neat!  And yes, it’s the official Carnival for January (posting 1 February, 2019).

 
2 Comments

Posted by on 1 Jan 2019 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

The November Carnival is Up

Over at Bob McDonald’s place.  Enjoy!

 
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Posted by on 1 Dec 2018 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

The September Biblical Studies Carnival: A Learning Extravaganza At the Fair

Below you’ll find a whole midway of Biblical Studies learning.  Check out the Hebrew Bible Hoop Shot, The New Testament Nacho Stall, the Archaeology Arcade, The Miscellaneous Mouse Coaster, and the Book Bumble Bee!  There are enough thrills here to delight even the most stoic scholar or student.  Or even the most angry of the angriest angry atheists.

At the Gate

Before you proceed one step further, you HAVE to read Dan Wallace’s post on the importance of the biblical languages in theological education.  Go do it now.

The Hebrew Bible Hoop Shot

It’s time to try your skills with the round ball and see how many points you can score by reading the posts described.  To start off, give a read to this essay which is over on Travis Bohlinger’s blog on teaching Hebrew Bible outside of your confessional boundaries if you aren’t Jewish.

There’s some Hebrew Bible stuff noted by Jose here.  3 points.

Mid October be sure not to miss the Annual Genizah Lecture if you are in or around Cambridge.  If you attend, you get three points.

John Rogerson lectured, shortly before his death (on 4 September, 2018- may he rest in peace), on the forgiveness of sin.  Give it a watch.  Deane has also assembled other lectures by Rogerson on things like the Kingdom of God and the Prophets.

James Tabor (my best friend from olden times) posted an interesting snippet on the Messiah before Jesus.  Give it a read.

The LXX readers edition editors are very excited about pre-publication endorsings.  You may be too.  Personally I’m very excited about the volume’s appearance.  In spite of the fact that I haven’t seen it…

Semitica is out with a new volume, number 60, edited by Langlois and Römer.

Did you know that Song of Songs was the most popular book of the Bible in the Middle Ages?  Yup.  Thanks, weird ‘Jesus is my boyfriend’ mystic loons.  Read the post.  It’s good.

The New Testament Nacho Stall

Time for a snack, on New Testament cheesy nachos.  First up, the British New Testament Society annual meeting was held at St Mary’s, Twickenham.  There was plenty of tasty tacos and buttery biscuits and cotton candy to be had by all who attended.  The conference, open to all who are duly qualified, meets every September somewhere in the UK.

Christian Brady has some observations about the Syro-phonecian woman.  Spicy!

Nympha, anyone?  Nympha and the letter to the Colossians?  Well here’s your post!  Give it a read.  It’s spicy!

Michael Jones has some great stuff (jalapeno-esque) to say about Schweitzer and Paul and suffering.  Michael has been friends with Timothy Bertolet for a long time, so he’s something of an expert on suffering.

For pity’s sake… stop with the goat talk.  Richard Goode is behind this.  Richard *The Goat* Goode is a bad, bad, bad, bearded, bad man.

Conrad Gempf (LST) gave a 20 minute talk on Jesus and the Scriptures.  Enjoy.  It’s got a bit of onion but cheesy onion nachos are super.

Lauren Larkin on Luke.  Lovely.  Look.  It’s laudable.

Did you know that Mark’s use of the Old Testament is important for understanding his Christology?  Wow.  Next, we discover that water, when liquid, is wet, and we then learn that a bullet to the head can be seriously injurious!!!!!  More cheese please!

Christian Brady did a video lecture for a group and even though it posted at the tail end of August, I’m including it here, because I know you never saw it:

Phil Long did a series of posts on the Sermon on the Mount.  Here’s the kickoff.  And you can find the rest on his blogge.

Here’s a recap of the BNTS annual meeting.  Nice work, Travis…  Travis seems like a nice person though he may well not be.  I don’t know.  I’ve not met him.  He may be a serial killer.  Who knows.  Anyway, read his post.  It’s not like he can reach through your screen and strangle you.

Luke 23:46… in music….  Okie dokie.  That’s nacho-esque right there.  Very nacho-esque.

Jimbob Snapp has some interesting comments about Mark 7:3f.  It’s a load of nachos without too much cheese.  (But I wish he had a better blog layout.  I don’t like the aesthetics of it.  That’s just me, and I’m not being judgy, but it reminds me of the 1st generation America Online style and it hurts my soul and senses).

Mike Bird has some interesting things to say about the book of Revelation and the doctrine of revelation.  Give it a read.  It’s just mildly cheesy.

The Archaeology / Dead Sea Scrolls Arcade

Test your skills and see if you can tell the fakes from the real thing.  One thing’s certain; the articles from Dead Sea Discoveries and made freely available to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the journal are anything but fakes.

Israel Finkelstein lectured in Zurich and the three lectures have been posted on the University’s theology department YouTube page.  Enjoy.  There’s lot’s of wisdom there.

Michael Langlois was in Australia talking about forgery stuff.  If you missed it, you missed it.

Did they find the church where the First Council of Nicaea was held nearly 1700 years ago?  Maybe.  The evidence sure seems to be there.  If they did, well that’s just pretty cool.  And I can’t wait to see how BAR exaggerates it!  Fun times!

On the other hand, 9 Dead Sea Scrolls ‘discovered’ in recent years are obviously fakes.  Well, I mean obvious to everyone but BAR readers.  But, speaking of the Scrolls, T&T Clark published what will be a standard volume for study of the Scrolls on the 20th.  It’s a massive volume with massive amounts of information.

If you would like to learn archaeology from an actual archaeologist- take Aren Maeir’s MOOC – coming soon!  It looks fantastic.

The Miscellaneous Mouse Coaster

Sit back, relax, and prepare to be turned upside down and lose all the change in your pocket.  Michael Bird has some thoughts on dealing with predatory priests drawn from Basil.  If only the Romanists would follow Basil’s guidance.

Ready to be really horrified?  Then hop on the academic publisher paywall exploitation express!  Yeah, I’m looking right at you JSTOR.

There’s still time for you to make plans to attend the Mowinckel Memorial Lecture, given in November by the brilliant Anne Katrine Gudme.

The Museum of the Bible… some don’t like it.  Peter talks about how Alexander talks about it.  It’s worth talking about their talking about it but it itself is something each person on their own has to decide their feely feelings about without having their sentiments dictated to them from Iowa or Yale or Birmingham.  Make up your own minds, sheeple.

Get your calendar (or diary, if you’re a Britlander) and take note of the dates of the 2019 meeting of IOSCS.  And if that meeting doesn’t make your heart pound maybe Syriac Bootcamp will…  Man that sounds terrifying.  I don’t know, but I think they make you eat Syriac and drink Syriac and carry around big heavy bags of Syriac and sleep on Syriac and it all seems so cruel.  But maybe you’re into that…

Randy B. takes a look at the Golden Mouth and Calvin.  Sure, it’s not something related to the Bible but it’s a good post so I’m including it.  If you don’t like it, be sure to comment below….

Interesting lecture here about those who like and those who don’t like Semites, in biblical studies.  And thanks, Deane.  Speaking of Deane Galbraith, he wins the post title of the month with this one: An Assmannian Global Spirituality Index.  Germans have such funny names.  And talk about a roller coaster stomach churning plunge…

There was a lot of discussion of Nike this month.  Randy did the best job of discussing it.  You should read it.  Strictly speaking, it’s not a biblical studies post- but it does have to do with biblical interpretation/application and that’s a good enough reason to include it here.

Hey, go work at Emory!  If your thing is New Testament, that is.  They already have Jacob Wright, so they don’t need anyone else for Hebrew Bible.

The Book Bumble Bee

Welcome to the stinging (of your bank account).

First up, the Logos free book of the month for September was Walter Kaiser’s ‘Preaching and Teaching the Last Things’.  It’s a different one now, because the free book for October is up.  And I don’t know what it is.  Because this post went live before the posting of the new free book of the month.  So go find out what it is.  And avoid Kaiser’s book because it’s fundamentalist rubbish.

Don’t miss Paula Fredriksen’s review of Matthew Thiessen’s book on Paul.

Michael Jones is sharing news of a 40th anniversary edition of Sanders’ ‘Paul and Palestinian Judaism’.  Go ahead and get a copy if you don’t already have one.  It’s quite a large book (which means it says far more than we know) and it is a real sleep aid / door stop / deadly weapon when hurled at an annoying person’s head!  It’s multi-purpose!

Evidently one or two people who read something called ‘Credo’ magazine must be mildly interested in actual biblical scholarship (I know, it shocked me too), because they convinced Will Ross to write something about the LXX.  I’m sure in their heads they read that ‘El, ex, ex’ and don’t know what it means.  Hopefully Will can help them.

Don’t read this terrible interview by the terrible Travis Bowlinger of the equally terrible Chris Le Keith.  Don’t do it.  It’s about a good series but the two principles of the post are terrible.  Terrible……..

Interested in the history of scholarship?  German scholarship?  German Dead Sea Scrolls scholarship?  If you answered yes, this will be of interest to you.

Do take a look at the post on the OUP blog about a new book on Darwinism.  You won’t regret it as much as you would a bee sting.

Exit

We hope you had fun.  But, really, it doesn’t matter.  Because we did.  As you leave, make sure you haven’t forgotten your children.  And here’s our final word, brought to you by Terry Eagleton:

“Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology.” Terry Eagleton

Hahahahaha.  Dilettante owned.

See you next time!

 
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Posted by on 1 Oct 2018 in Archaeology, Biblical Studies Carnival, Books, Dead Sea Scrolls

 

The Biblical Studies Carnival: Time is Running Out…

I have the September 2018 carnival (Due October 1).  So if you see something on the blogs about biblical studies and related fields, pass them along.  Especially if they are from a blog that is little known.  Let’s get the word out about blogs people should be reading.

Time is up.  Send along those suggestions by tomorrow.

 
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Posted by on 28 Sep 2018 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

Karen Keen Has the Carnival

Give it a look!  It is wonderfully done, clued me in on lots of things I’d missed, and I surely hope she will do it again.  In the meanwhile, Phil Long writes

Next month Kevin Turner at Monday Morning Theologian is hosting the Biblical Studies carnival (August 2018, Due September 1) and veteran carnival host Jim West has the September 2018 carnival (Due October 1).  If you would like to host a Biblical Studies Carnival, now is the time to volunteer.

I am borderline desperate for the rest of the year!  Please contact me via email (plong42@gmail.com), twitter direct message (@plong42) or comment here in this carnival. Whether you are a relatively new blogger or you have hosted a carnival in the past, do not hesitate to contact me. October, November and December are open as of July 1. It is not too early to volunteer for a 2019 carnival.

Don’t let Phil be borderline anything.  Volunteer.  It’s really a very enjoyable thing to do hosting a Carnival.

 
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Posted by on 1 Aug 2018 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

The June Biblical Studies Carnival Of Sadness: Dedicated to the Memory of Philip R. Davies

June kicked off with the worst possible news:  Philip Davies, a longtime friend and one of the absolute giants in our field, had died.  I posted a few things on that horrible dayI still miss him.  I always will.  In his honor this month’s Carnival is dedicated to his abiding memory- which, to those of us who knew him both personally and academically, will always be for a blessing.

NBBible and Interpretation has a collection of his essays- just scroll down till you come to it.  It also has an obituary by Thomas Thompson.  Lester Grabbe shares a few thoughts over at the SBL site, and duplicates the same on the EABS site. Deane has a series of video links to Philip talking about various interesting things.  I posted my own reflections about Philip hereAirton Jose de Silva has assembled a listing of the appallingly few posts on Philip’s life and passing.  Most appalling of all, to me, is the fact that the Palestine Exploration Fund, of which Philip has been President for several years, has said absolutely nothing!  It’s disgraceful.

Hebrew Bible/ LXX

Mark Scarlata of St Milletus is interviewed about his new commentary on Exodus.  A bit of happy news in the midst of sadness.  Bill Ross had some things to say about the Septuagint Reader’s Edition- a volume about which I am unnaturally excited.  Perversely excited.  Unduly excited.  Sinfully excited.

Codex Gigas, the ‘Devil’s Bible’, is the subject of this recording.  Give it a listen.

Do you like Assyrian and Babylonian medicine, magic, and divination?  Then here’s a book notice that you’ll particularly enjoy.

Happy news for OT scholars-  now freely available online, Barthélemy’s Critique textuelle de l’ancien Testament.  Yee haw.

They’re having a Symposium on the Septuagint down in Stellenbosch.  Will *The Giant* Ross has all the information including the schedule.

Lester Grabbe has a new book out on science and faith.  Surely it will be of interest to everyone on the sphere. Or at least to some of you.

They talk about Bob Miller’s new book on dragons and other things like that over on a book news blog site.

Second Temple exegesis?  From the perspective of Bar Ilan University?  Now that’s fun.  Way more fun than a visit to the dentist or having a cruel Professor insist that you read something by NT Wright (which in Europe is now classified as cruel and unusual punishment!).

Rafael Frankel has a brief note on Shishak that’s worth a couple of minutes of your time.  Shishak.  Shishak.

Konrad Schmid has written a fantastic piece titled ‘Who Wrote the Torah?‘  Give it your full attention.

Michael Langlois was interviewed by ‘Campus Protestant‘ about the Bible and I’m sad to report that he didn’t mention either me nor The Commentary once.  Meanie pants.

The British Museum is opening a new exhibition on Ashurbanipal and in the run up they have a load of info on their blog.  Be sure to give it a look.

New Testament

LDAB posted a really neat little table of the New Testament books in a list with a link to the oldest manuscript of that book.  Fun times for the text critics.

Crossley on cults.  What fun.

Langlois on Jesus.  What fun.

Walton on gaps.  What, fun?

Porter on metaphor.  What could be more fun (except GB Caird’s work – Language and Imagery of the Bible.)

Some odd stuff from Dan Wallace about that not first century fragment of Mark.  Worth your time if you’re one of the 19 people on the planet who care about 2nd century fragments that provide zero new information.

Young Dr Professor James Crossley, an up and coming academic superstar, gave a lecture on cults, martyrs and something else.  Give it a watch. Oh, and speaking of cults…

And Chris Tilling (who seems to have lost what remained of his hair) gave a lecture on Paul.  I didn’t watch it- but you may want to.  I’m suffering #PaulFatigue.  So many saying so little about the most uninteresting of all the New Testament writers.  Let’s get to work on John, or Peter, shall we ladies?

As SBL approaches, people are beginning to announce their paper deliveries.  Here’s one: Staging Bíos: A Diegetic and Mimetic Analysis of Speech in the Gospels within the Biographical Tradition.  Helloooooo, book hall!

And the BIG news in the New Testament world in June???   Settle back, take a sip of your favorite beverage (non alcoholic), and buckle up… for…. Chris…. Tilling…. actually…. blogged!!!!! Sure, it’s a totally uninteresting post but do you realize that it was 1998 when last then young Mr Doctor Professor Tilling blogged? It’s a miracle!

Archaeology/ Dead Sea Scrolls

Ever want or need help finding the DSS caves whilst visiting Qumran? Fret no more.  Ever want to find out about a fake bit of archaeological fakery?  Well once again, you can.

Here’s something fun for the Qumranophiles.

Sidnie Crawford White gave a super lecture on the Scrolls.  Brother Deane has it.

They found a trinket which supposedly represents the head of a ‘biblical’ King (and of course some ‘scholars’ are even asserting that it’s this or that king, thus ‘proving’ the Bible yet again via archaeological discoveries).  So I had a thought or two about it.

There’s just so much shadiness around the acquisition and publication of putative ancient manuscripts.  Lots of people will have lots to answer for.

The Museum of the Bible is in the press again for its funding of an illegal dig in the West Bank.  Because it’s a day with a name ending in ‘y’.  At some point the MOTB is going to need to pay for all the free publicity its getting and all the animus the progs are hurling at it which only serves to motivate conservative Christians to visit and support the museum.  Every attack results in financial gain for both the Greens and their enterprises.

You are granted free access to various issues of DSD- till August 16.  Take a look.

Books

The people who produce BibleWorks bible software emailed users on the 1st of June to announce that the business was closing down.  So that’s a bummer.  Meanwhile, if you’re looking for a great Bible software package that’s actually free you need to take a look at S.T.E.P.  I have my students each semester get it.

Tavis B. thought about a book this month.  Something abut apocalypticism

The Zurichers have added a new section to their New Testament blog titled ‘Book Reviews’.  This month includes two new one. Prof. Andreas Lindemann in the „Theologische Rundschau“ (82/3) on Jordash Kiffiak’s Responses in the Miracle Stories of the Gospels: Between Artistry and Inherited Tradition, and Prof. Dietrich-Alex Koch in the „Theologische Literaturzeitung“ (143/68) on Christoph Heilig’s Paul’s Triumph: Reassessing 2 Corinthians 2:14 in Its Literary and Historical Context.  Enjoy.

Don’t miss this: the T&T Clark Companion to the Dead Sea Scrolls comes out in July!  Charlotte Hempel is a great scholar and her clearheadedness is sure to guarantee the usefulness of this work.

Ugh.  A podcast on a book.  Why, O Lord…  Let me just go ahead and say this- podcasts are the invention of the Antichrist.  Just say no to podcasting.  Go ahead, make recordings of things and even videos.  But for the love of all that’s holy stop being so bloody pretentious.  Otherwise…

Phil Long reviewed some book about some Church Father thingy.  Come on, people, only Jerome among the Fathers is worth knowing.

A fascinating review about a fascinating book about early Christians and censorship is posted here.  Wow!  Now that’s how you review a book.  And, by the same reviewer (a true gift to the guild that one) is a review of a new commentary on Proverbs.  There’s also a fine review of Paul Middleton’s book on Revelation that is must reading.

Interested in Franz Delitzsch?  Well this new book on his life and work is worth your time.  And if you’re a student of the book of Job- well this one’s going to be right up your alley.

Interested in the Bible and Archaeology?  Well then this book by Matthieu Richelle will be right up your excavation.

Miscellaneous

Oxford celebrated John Barton’s 70th birthday.  John is a superstar.  I wish I could have been there.

Sidnie White Crawford visited the Museum of the Bible.  Give her review of it a look.

Well the much ballyhooed ‘Mark Fragment’ didn’t go away in June (like it should have).  Instead, there were more claims made about the thing – to be precise, about its editor...

Don’t skip Richard Goode’s discussion of migrants, refugees, and the Bible.  It’s from a couple of years ago but it’s worth mentioning again in these troubled times.

Hmmm… Here’s a post on Trump, Socrates, and the Bible….  What could go wrong?

Not in the ‘biblical studies’ realm but surely of interest to most will be Diarmaid MacCulloch’s lectures on Cromwell.  Do. Not. Miss it.

James McGrath pointed out a conference for those interested in Syriac textual criticism.

Some guy with a code name asks if the Bible is understandable, and then talks about Wayne Grudem…

And finally- the Biblioblog Top 50 is back in town! Guess who tops the list… That’s right!  And all the Carnivals are listed here.

 

All the Carnivals- and, Last Call for this Month’s Official (It Seems) Carnival

The current list of all Carnivals is posted here.  Last I heard, Phil Long, the organizer of the carnival, had put out a call for a June host (posting 1 July) but no one had responded.  So I guess the Avignonian Carnival I run here will have to serve as the ‘official’ entry.

So, send along your entries!

 
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Posted by on 30 Jun 2018 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

Carnival Submissions

Send. Them. In.

 
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Posted by on 24 Jun 2018 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

The May Biblioblog Carnival from Avignon

It’s 1 June and that means it’s hot out and that means it’s time for you to enjoy cool biblical studies blogging at its best.  And that means that it’s time to review the best posts of the preceding month.  And that means the best posts in biblical studies which appeared in May.  Here they are.  Sit back.  Have a cold one (and by that I mean root beer). Enjoy!

Hebrew Bible / Old Testament

A conference in Jerusalem revealed a series of texts recently deciphered from the Qumran caves, including one that seems to indicate the existence of a heretofore unknown manuscript.  It was biblioblogged here.  James McGrath went on something of a rampage against the young earth creationist people, posting several entries on May 2 on the topic- this being one of them.  I don’t think he’s a fan of the YEC.

Down Under they’re pitching an energy drink as a replacement for God and they’re using David to do it.  Thanks, Deane….

Interested in the Ark of the Covenant?  Then you need to watch this lecture by Thomas Römer.  It’s very learned.

Animals.

And watch this lecture about the Phoenecians…  because apparently they never existed… like New Zealanders and Hobbits…

Andy Stanley (a mega-church pastor who is by that very fact clearly no theologian or biblical scholar) blathered in May about Christians ‘unhitching’ from aspects of the Old Testament (the feckless heretic).  And he’s called on the carpet for it by the very wise Carmen Imes.  And unlike Stanley and all of his tragically ignorant defenders, Imes actually is a scholar.

If you’re in the mood for absolute lunacy, check out the craziness of the Answers in Genesis crowd…  as it tries to prove that Solomon was a monogamous soul.  Good heavens.

The editors of the forthcoming ‘LXX Readers Edition’ discuss their choice of the base text here.  They made the only sensible decision.

New Testament

The Jesus Blog people talked about a conference on social scientific criticism (etc) over on their semi-cool blog.  The conference has already taken place as this carnival posts but I’m sure that Chris Keith and the other participants will be happy to tell you all about th …..  zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz……….

Don’t skip John Barclay’s Firth Lecture.  It’s about Paul.  And Gifts.  Speaking of gifts, my birthday is coming up…  And remember, it’s more blessed to give to Jim (vl) than it is to receive.

George Athas wants to tell you about the parable of the talents.  You know who has talent?  Not Joel Watts.

A movie review showed up this month- about textual criticism.  Go figure.  Speaking of TC, here’s another interesting TC bitlet on Ephesians.  And yet more TC joy is over here, on Codex Marchalianus.

#Papyrusgate. Yup.  Because silly claims were made about a fragment of Mark supposedly dating to the first century but which, surprise surprise, doesn’t.  And, just in case you needed something to live in hope for, Larry Hurtado points out that ‘billions and billions’ (in the voice of that annoying science guy who’s dead) of fragments are yet to be studied.  So who knows, maybe among the rubbish there’s something that isn’t.  And then this happened.  And then this.  How long, O Lord…

Deane Galbraith tweeted “There will be a debate on whether Luke used Matthew (Mark Goodacre) or Matthew used Luke (Alan Garrow) at , in September. Just when you thought the Synoptic Problem couldn’t get any MORE exciting!!”   ZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz………..

John Barclay gave an excellent talk on anthropology, theology and history at the University of Zurich that, if you missed, you can watch here.

Larry Hurtado talks some about anonymous Gospels.  (Pro-tip- all the gospels are anonymous).

Richard Goode is teaching Greek this Summer at Newman.  You’ll want to attend if you’re anywhere around Birmingham.  And while there, you’ll want to throw things at Richard and mock him mightily and mercilessly.  He expects it.  No, really, he wants you to throw things at him…

Rick Brannan offers some thoughts on what early Christians read.  Pro-tip:  none of them read anything by NT Wright (and if they had they would have called a Council to denounce and excommunicate him, amen).

Tim B. has a few things to say about 1Peter and the submission of wives… I guess he likes hate mail.

Archaeology

Herein the Museum of the Bible is gutted and the entrails hung up for a public display.  And Roberta Mazza gets quoted.

Dead Sea Scrolls stuff! Enjoy!  And more Dead Sea Scrolls stuff.  But you missed it.  If Michael is in your town in the future, you owe it to yourself to visit him.  Speaking of Dead Sea stuff, be sure to visit Matthieu Richelle’s new Paleo-Hebrew site.

Be sure to read Larry Schiffman’s ‘Jewish Connection to Jerusalem‘.  It’s archaeology-esque.

Books

This one you just have to see to believe.  I’ll just say – what do you get when you cross a graphic novel with Old Testament scholar Thomas Römer?

There’s something called the ‘Companion to the Bible and Film’ by T&T Clark- and there’s an interview about it.  So you should read it.  I think that if you take your bible to a film (not only are you a bit weird, but) you’re not going to be able to read it because it’s dark in the theater.  But maybe the book comes with tiny non invasive reading lights…

Phil Long reviewed a book about Messiah and Passover.  “Glaser began this book with an argument in favor of Christians celebrating Passover, or at least incorporating elements of Passover into their Christian worship.”   Nope.  Nope.  Nope.

The folk at New College mentioned a few online resources for biblical studies that will be on interest to many.  We have four new digital resource trials for Biblical Studies this month. They’re all accessible from the E-resource trials web page.  Take a look.  

And- run over right off and pick up the ‘Free Book of the Month’ from Logos.

Miscellaneous

Interestingly, the SBL archives have been moved down to Atlanta.  Hmmm…  Makes sense really since the SBL headquarters are not but a few miles from Emory (where the Pitts library is).

Bill Ross is talking about the LXX Reader’s Edition at something called the Evangelical Theology Society.  I guess it’s Trump supporters who study theology (but for the life of me I can’t imagine anyone in that crowd being smart enough to study theology).  At any rate, Bill’s session should be good…  One hopes… I guess.

Visit the new website of the Oxford University, Oriel College, Centre for the Study of the Bible.  Sure, they spelled ‘center’ wrong… but otherwise it’s fantastic.

J. Crossley has an essay about the Bible and English politics that I’m sure must be good but it’s behind a pay wall.  But hey, for $43 I could buy access to it for 24 hours or I could snatch up the whole issue in which it appears for a paltry $123.  Which to choose…. which. To. Choose….   And speaking of JC- he’s sure to be at the BCTR(S) meeting in London.  So you should go if you can.  It will cost you less than renting an essay for a day….

The DMG has digitized its various journals.  Chuck Jones has the details and you’ll definitely want to rummage through some of those issues.

James Crossley has added another task to his impressive list of tasks.  And congrats to him for it.

Jim Spinti has some interesting things to say about translations.  Worth a read.

Tim B. is hosting the ‘Roman’ (i.e., ‘official’) Carnival over at his place.  And, dear friends, enjoy your Summer…

 
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Posted by on 1 Jun 2018 in Archaeology, Bible, Biblical Studies Carnival, Biblical Studies Resources, Books

 

There are Only A Couple of Days Left…

For you to send along your Carnival suggestions.  If you’ve seen a good biblioblog post, send it.

 
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Posted by on 28 May 2018 in Biblical Studies Carnival

 

Call For Carnival Submissions

Send along your submissions for the upcoming Biblical Studies Carnival (Avignon).  It’s shaping up to be a good one!  #ThereWillBeTears

 
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Posted by on 26 May 2018 in Biblical Studies Carnival