Time is Running Out…

This freshly published and just appearing Ugaritic grammar has arrived from the good folk at Hendrickson and I’m giving away a copy.

Here are the contest rules:

1- In a few paragraphs describe how you came to be interested in Ugaritic.

2- Are you presently in University or Grad School and pursuing Ugaritic studies?

3- If you’re chosen as the completely random winner based on your responses to the first 2 questions above, what will you do with the volume?

Contestants must reside in the United States and answers must be emailed to me by midnight, November 1, 2012, at jim@theology.edu.

There’s Still Time to Enter

This freshly published and just appearing Ugaritic grammar has arrived from the good folk at Hendrickson for review, along with a copy for me to give away to one lucky soul.

Here are the contest rules:

1- In a few paragraphs describe how you came to be interested in Ugaritic.

2- Are you presently in University or Grad School and pursuing Ugaritic studies?

3- If you’re chosen as the completely random winner based on your responses to the first 2 questions above, what will you do with the volume?

Contestants must reside in the United States and answers must be emailed to me by midnight, November 1, 2012, at jim@theology.edu.

Good luck.  And watch for my review in the not too distant future.

Win a Copy of John Huehnergard’s ‘An Introduction to Ugaritic’

This freshly published and just appearing Ugaritic grammar has arrived from the good folk at Hendrickson for review, along with a copy for me to give away to one lucky soul.

Here are the contest rules:

1- In a few paragraphs describe how you came to be interested in Ugaritic.

2- Are you presently in University or Grad School and pursuing Ugaritic studies?

3- If you’re chosen as the completely random winner based on your responses to the first 2 questions above, what will you do with the volume?

Contestants must reside in the United States and answers must be emailed to me by midnight, November 1, 2012, at jim@theology.edu.

Good luck.  And watch for my review in the not too distant future.

An Introduction to Ugaritic, by John Huehnergard

It’s brand spanking new and just announced- published by the good folk at Hendrickson:

Highly respected linguist John Huehnergard brings his command of and vast knowledge in the field of comparative Semitic linguistics to this introductory grammar. Every aspect of the grammar is enriched by his broad understanding, while maintaining an unexcelled directness and order to the learning of the fundamental grammar of Ugaritic.

Designed for students already familiar with Biblical Hebrew, this grammar contains the information necessary to help them become proficient in Ugaritic, and includes exercises to assist in learning basic grammar before commencing work with the actual Ugaritic texts. It is set apart from other gram¬mar books by its immense understanding of comparative Semitic grammar, and the concise and accurate manner in which Huehnergard presents the information.

My review is here.

What Languages Must One Know in order to be Competent in the Field of Biblical Studies?

I’d like to do something different than what Chris has (see his post for the background- and by the by, I’ve never heard of the people he’s responding to except the Duane guy – so this isn’t really part of that meme.  I’m just using it as a launching pad).

So, what languages must people know?  I’m going to answer in parts-

Part One- Pastors

Pastors need to know the Biblical languages: Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek.  At a minimum.  No pastor worth his salt will ‘kiss the beloved through a sheet’ and come away satisfied and none can expound the biblical text without being able to read it.

Part Two- Old Testament Scholars

These folk need to know Hebrew, Aramaic, Ugaritic, Akkadian, Eblaitic, and Greek.

Part Three- New Testament Scholars

Greek, Aramaic, Hebrew, Coptic, and Latin

Part Four- Text Critics

These need to know the relevant ancient languages of the text they are examining.  If an OT text, than all those which the OT scholar masters plus those of the NT scholar plus at least German and French.  If a NT text critic then, frankly, many more (since the NT is attested in numerous languages from up to the 5th century CE).

All of the languages listed by section above are the bare minimum for each.  It really is necessary to read one or more modern language as well so that one can keep up with developments in one’s field and not be shackled to the narrow parochialism so common of pastors and academics in North America.

Without mastery of the requisite languages, pastors will be deficient, and academics will be as well, incapable of understanding that which they profess to be explaining to others.