Tag Archives: Eric Cline

One Final Reminder: Eric Cline in Knoxville

1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed
Dr. Eric Cline
September 24, 2015
7:30 pm

Lindsay Young Auditorium, Hodges Library, University of Tennessee
Reception and book-signing to follow!!

In this compelling lecture, Dr. Eric Cline (George Washington University) will discuss his recent book 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed, which tells the gripping story of how the end of the Late Bronze Age was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries.

The book was the winner of the 2014 Award for the Best Popular Book from the American Schools of Oriental Research and an Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Archeology & Anthropology from the Association of American Publishers. It was one of The New York Post’s Best Books of 2014, one of The Australian’s Best Books of the Year in 2014, and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.

Eric H. Cline is professor of classics and anthropology and director of the Capitol Archaeological Institute at George Washington University. An active archaeologist, he has excavated and surveyed in Greece, Crete, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, and Jordan. His many books include From Eden to Exile: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Bible and The Trojan War: A Very Short Introduction.

This is the first lecture in the 2015-2016 Partnership for the Academic Study of Early Judaism annual lecture series and is free and open to the public. The lecture will be followed by a book-signing and reception.

Eric Cline in Knoxville

“1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed”
Eric Cline, George Washington University
September 24, 2015
Lindsay Young Auditorium, Hodges Library
University of Tennessee
7:30 pm

In this compelling lecture, Dr.Cline will discuss his recent book 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed, which tells the gripping story of how the end of the Late Bronze Age was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries.

The book was the winner of the 2014 Award for the Best Popular Book from the American Schools of Oriental Research and an Honorable Mention for the 2015 PROSE Award in Archeology & Anthropology from the Association of American Publishers. It was one of The New York Post’s Best Books of 2014, one of The Australian’s Best Books of the Year in 2014, and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.

Eric H. Cline is professor of classics and anthropology and director of the Capitol Archaeological Institute at George Washington University. An active archaeologist, he has excavated and surveyed in Greece, Crete, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, and Jordan. His many books include From Eden to Exile: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Bible and The Trojan War: A Very Short Introduction.

This is the first lecture in the 2015-2016 Partnership for the Academic Study of Early Judaism annual lecture series.

There will also be a book signing after the lecture.  So if you’re in the area, come on by.  You may even have the chance to meet me!  How awesome would that be?

Changes at Megiddo

About a month ago our friend Eric Cline, co-director of the Expedition, wrote to me to announce his wish to retire from the Megiddo operation. Eric is busy with many duties as co-director at Kabri, now editor of BASOR, teacher, researcher, author and above all, family man, and all this has become a bit too much for him. I answered my friend Eric with warm words – to thank him for his over 20 years contribution to the success of the Megiddo Expedition and for his friendship.
 
As a result of Eric’s decision, we had to take decisions regarding the future management of the Expedition. Margaret, Sivan, Matt, Mario and I met today and decided as follows:
1. Starting in the season of 2016 (well, effectively as of today), the Expedition is directed by Israel Finkelstein, Matthew Adams and Mario Martin. 
2. This means that Matt takes over the management of the Megiddo consortium.
 
For me personally it is with great satisfaction that I see two of my Megiddo students (one of them joined at the age of 18!) become co-directors.
 
Again, I am sure that I am speaking on behalf of all of us to thank Eric for his many years with us and wish him the best in the coming years; as I told him earlier today, he will remain a prominent member of the House of Lords of Megiddo/Armageddon…
 
Israel Finkelstein

Eric Cline’s Public Lecture- Tonight

fink_clineAuthor, archaeologist, and Biblical scholar Dr. Eric Cline presents on the 4,000 year conflict in ancient and contemporary Jerusalem on Wednesday, Sept. 25, at Arcadia University. Free and open to the public, “Jerusalem Besieged: 4,000 Years of Conflict in the City of Peace” is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. in the Mirror Room of Grey Towers Castle.

The lecture will look at how the city’s history has struggled with peace, with revolts, riots, military battles, terrorist attacks, and religious and political strife. Dr. Cline also will illustrate how studying Jerusalem’s long history can illuminate how archaeology, politics, and nationalism are frequently linked in the troubled environment of the Middle East today and how modern political factions exploit ancient conflicts and their archaeology.

If you’re near Arcadia- go give him a listen.  He’s pretty good.

Tel Kabri: The 2013 Season

Eric Cline mentioned this and I’m happy to pass it along:

Tel Kabri at the end of the 2013 excavation season. Photo: SkyView Photography, Ltd.

Tel Kabri at the end of the 2013 excavation season. Photo: SkyView Photography, Ltd.

The 2013 excavations at the Middle Bronze Age (c. 1750–1550 B.C.E.) Canaanite site of Tel Kabri uncovered architecture and artifacts from one of the largest palatial sites in Israel. I had the good fortune to be a member of the excavation team and wrote a series of blog posts about life on the dig mid-season. However, a view from the trenches is never complete, and the excavation directors recently released a preliminary report on the results of this summer’s fieldwork. The full “Preliminary Report on the Results of the 2013 Excavation Season at Tel Kabri,” written by excavation co-directors Assaf Yasur-Landau (University of Haifa) and Eric H. Cline (George Washington University), associate director Andrew Koh (Brandeis University), and area supervisors Nurith Goshen (University of Pennsylvania), Alexandra Ratzlaff (Boston University) and Inbal Samet (University of Haifa), is available as a free pdf download here.

There’s a good bit more for your enjoyment and enlightenment.  Take a gander.  And click on the photo to enlarge it.

Kabri 2013

There’s a facebook page for the dig at Kabri which commences in just about a week.  Bookmark it and drop in from time to time to see plaster-fragswhat’s going on.  There’s also a blog.  So, you can be sure to know what’s happening at Eric Cline’s excavation (I’m sure there are others digging there too, but I know Eric).

We have a variety of objectives planned for the 2013 season, including finishing the excavation of the Orthostat Building, investigating the large area to the west of the palace (which may include a courtyard), and exploring the fortifications of the city. In order to achieve our goals we will necessarily do more than just excavation, including scientific studies onsite involving micro-morphology, zooarchaeology, residue analysis, and more.

Boy oh boy, to be there in person…

Why You Should, Again, Read Eric Cline’s Book When it Comes Out

Because his conclusions says, among other things, this:

The period of the Late Bronze Age has rightfully been hailed as one of the golden ages in the history of the world and as a period during which an early global economy successfully flourished. So we must ask, would the history of the world have taken a different turn, or followed a different path, if the civilizations in these regions had not come to an end? What if the series of earthquakes in Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean had not taken place? What if there had been no drought, no famine, no migrants or invaders? Would the Late Bronze Age have eventually come to an end anyway, since all civilizations seem to rise and fall? Would any of the developments that followed have eventually come about no matter what?  (p. 223 ).

In all, Cline’s book asks all the right questions, hits all the right notes, and covers all the right ground.  It is copiously annotated (and makes use of endnotes)(which, of course, has its pros and cons). and carefully researched.

Cline is able to show, conclusively and irrefutably, that the crises which bedevil modern life are not new.   They are at least as old as 1177: The Year Civilization Collapsed.

Eric Cline’s Book “From Eden to Exile” for the Kindle

clineThe Kindle edition of From Eden to Exile, complete with a new Afterword, has just been released today and is now available for download, just in time for Hannukah and Christmas.  It’s a very, very fine book and the Kindle edition evidently contains a few updates and some additional material.  So there’s even more reason to read it.

So even if you don’t celebrate Hannukah or Christmas, get it anyway.  Get it for yourself.  Get it for your grandma.  Get it for you brother.  And be sure to get it for your spouse.  They’ll appreciate it.  For real.

Things You Should Know About the New ‘Archaeology and the Media’ Volume

First, you should know that, as Eric Meyers notes

The first essay in the section “Archaeology and the Media” is Eric Cline’s powerful piece—“Fabulous Finds or Fantastic Forgeries? The Distortion of Archaeology by the Media and Pseudoarchaeologists, and What We Can Do About It”—criticizing the media for its participation in the dissemination of false or misleading information. The fact that reputable outlets continue to follow reports about the discovery of “biblical artifacts,” such as Noah’s ark or the ark of the covenant, or “biblical sites,” such as Sodom and Gomorrah or the Garden of Eden, shows how ill-informed the media is about current scholarship on the Bible and archaeology. In offering numerous examples of this sort of reporting, he chides both the press and the academy for its lack of courage in addressing the sort of misrepresentation of what is otherwise presented responsibly in hundreds of colleges, universities, and seminaries worldwide. He even engages with the popular magazine Biblical Archaeology Review and its role in the claims that an inscribed ossuary bears the name of James, brother of the Jesus of the New Testament. Cline concludes by offering a helpful strategy that scholars might use in the difficult terrain of working with the media.

And second, you should know that the entire volume is noteworthy and accessible. I recommend it- not only for Eric (Clines) piece but for the whole.

‘Famous Archaeologists’? Really? Because That’s not Eric Cline in that Photo!

Joe Zias told me about this strange little website – called ‘Great Archaeology‘.  Hmmm….  So I thought I’d look around.  You know, see what I could see.  So I thumbed through and first off noticed that they list archaeologists alphabetically by first name, not by last.  Then I noticed that they listed James Tabor as a ‘famous archaeologist’.  But of course he isn’t an archaeologist at all.  Then I noticed that they didn’t list Oded Lipschits!  What?  No list of archaeologists is complete if he is absent.  But see for yourself, look at the “O’s”-

And then, best of all, they have Eric Cline listed… but I’ve met Eric, and unless he has had sexual reassignment surgery in the last year, that isn’t Eric!

Oh boy.  I mean oh girl…  Oh my.  If you’re going to have an archaeology page, you really should get the facts right.

A Tiny Seed And The Tremendous Information it Can Provide: Megiddo

With thanks to Eric Cline for sending along word of this report:

Archaeologist Israel Finkelstein is leading his sweating guests to a corner of Tel Megiddo. He points to a black stain on a rock, which on closer inspection turn out to be charred seeds. “This,” he says, “is the most important find at Tel Megiddo.”

Further on

In one of the four excavation areas on the mound, each marked by its own flag, we come back to the charred crumbs Finkelstein says were the mound’s most important find. Here, under a rainbow flag, we are told they are tiny seeds that Megiddo’s inhabitants collected around 3,000 years ago. They went up in flames when the city was destroyed.  They are important because of their location in relation to finds above and below them. Organic material like this is especially valuable because it can undergo carbon-14 testing, allowing the level where it was found to be dated.

And this very interesting segment-

One of the black layers indicates destruction in the 10th century. Finkelstein’s detractors say David destroyed this city – an idea that Finkelstein rejects because he says the carbon-14 dating rules out the possibility that the city was destroyed suddenly. It shows a gradual process.  Finkelstein now believes that the 10th century destruction came at the hands of “mountain Israelites” from the region of Samaria, which led to the rise of the northern kingdom.

There’s a lot more to the report, and I’m hopeful to have photos of the flags mentioned in the report very soon.

Megiddo Today

Eric has added more photos (and seems to be uploading even more moment by moment as I post this), so check them out and then check them out again later.  I’ll note again, it seems like the ladies are doing most of the work.  Or, Eric simply takes more pictures of them…  it’s a toss up.   😉

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More On the Mysterious Reappearance of the Megiddo Hoard in the News Today

Earlier I mentioned a press release which described something described months ago in a find at Megiddo.  There’s more, as the American Friends of Tel Aviv University point out (with thanks to Joe Lauer for the heads up) –

Researchers from Tel Aviv University have recently discovered a collection of gold and silver jewelry, dated from around 1100 B.C., hidden in a vessel at the archaeological site of Tel Megiddo in the Jezreel Valley in northern Israel. One piece — a gold earring decorated with molded ibexes, or wild goats — is “without parallel,” they believe.

According to Prof. Israel Finkelstein of TAU’s Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures, the vessel was found in 2010, but remained uncleaned while awaiting a molecular analysis of its content. When they were finally able to wash out the dirt, pieces of jewelry, including a ring, earrings, and beads, flooded from the vessel. Prof. Finkelstein is the co-director of the excavation of Tel Megiddo along with Professor Emeritus David Ussishkin of Tel Aviv University and Associate Director Prof. Eric Cline of George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

The researchers believe that the collection, which was discovered in the remains of a private home in the northern part of Megiddo, belongs to a time period called “Iron I,” and that at least some of the pieces could have originated in nearby Egypt. Some of the materials and designs featured in the jewelry, including beads made from carnelian stone, are consistent with Egyptian designs from the same period, notes Ph.D. candidate Eran Arie, who supervises the area where the hoard was found.