The British New Testament Society 2018 Meeting Call for Papers

Dear colleagues,

The Call for Papers for this year’s British New Testament Conference is now open. The conference will be taking place at St Mary’s University, Twickenham (London), Thursday 6 to Saturday 8 September 2018.

The Call for Papers for each session is below. Proposals of not more than 300 words should be sent directly to the Seminar Chairs by Friday 20 April 2018. Please direct any enquiries about the call directly to the relevant seminar chairs and not to me.

Proposals for the Simultaneous Short Papers should be sent to me on steve.walton@cantab.net, and not to this address.

We very much look forward to seeing you in Twickenham in September.

Best wishes,

Steve

Professor Steve Walton
Secretary, British New Testament Society

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CALL FOR PAPERS: BRITISH NEW TESTAMENT CONFERENCE 2018
St Mary’s University, Twickenham (London), 6-8 September 2018

Proposals for papers are invited for the British New Testament Conference 2018 to be held in Twickenham, London from Thursday 6 to Saturday 8 September. Paper proposals with a title and an abstract of not more than 300 words should be sent directly to the relevant Seminar chairs by Friday 20 April 2018. Proposals for the Simultaneous Short Paper session should be sent to the Secretary, Professor Steve Walton (steve.walton@cantab.net). Specific seminar contact details and calls for papers are below.

The Book of Acts
Sean Adams (sean.adams@glasgow.ac.uk)
Matthew Sleeman (matthews@oakhill.ac.uk) We welcome seminar papers approaching Acts from a variety of angles and using a variety of methods: historical, literary, textual-critical, theological, archaeological, the social world, possible links/parallels with other biblical and ancient writings, and so on. We also include topics for discussion which relate Acts to the wider contexts of Luke-Acts and the Pauline corpus, where they are relevant and helpful to the study of Acts. Offers of papers are welcome both from research students (this is a great opportunity to ‘try out’ your ideas) and from more established scholars.

The Acts and Synoptic Gospels seminar groups are happy to announce that they will be having a joint session as one of our three sessions scheduled for the 2018 Conference. In light of this collaboration, we are particularly interested in receiving paper proposals that engage with the theme of rhetoric in Luke-Acts. If you are interested in offering a paper for this joint session, please email either the co-chairs of the Synoptic Gospels or Acts groups. Papers may require a full seminar session for discussion (90 minutes) or take half a session (45 minutes).
We make papers available on the British New Testament Society web site a few weeks before the conference so that seminar members can read them in advance. At the seminar, the paper’s author presents a 10-15 minute summary before discussion, in order to maximise discussion time in the seminar.

Hebrews
David Moffitt (dm206@st-andrews.ac.uk)
Loveday Alexander ‎(l.c.alexander@sheffield.ac.uk)
Whilst papers on any topic relating to Hebrews will be considered, the Hebrews Group particularly invites proposals relating to the topic of the interpretation of the tabernacle (heavenly and/or earthly) in Hebrews.

Jesus
Helen Bond (h.bond@ed.ac.uk)
Justin Meggitt (jjm1000@cam.ac.uk)

Johannine Literature
Cornelis Bennema (cbennema@ust.ac.uk)
Andy Byers (a.j.byers@durham.ac.uk)
The Johannine Literature seminar invites papers on the Gospel of John and/or the Johannine Epistles. Offers of papers are welcome both from established scholars and from research students and the seminar provides an excellent opportunity for feedback from experts in the field.

Usually, one full session is dedicated to the discussion of a major paper by invitation. In the remaining two sessions, there is scope for four to five papers. Papers are normally 30 minutes, allowing time for questions and discussion, but shorter papers of 20 minutes are also welcome.

The Book of Revelation
Michelle Fletcher (michelle.fletcher@kcl.ac.uk)
Garrick Allen (garrick.allen@dcu.ie)

New Testament and Early Christianity
Dominika Kurek-Chomycz ‎(kurekcd@hope.ac.uk)
Francis Watson (francis.watson@dur.ac.uk)
The New Testament texts exist within the much broader phenomenon of early Christianity as a whole, and this seminar is concerned especially with aspects of the total phenomenon that go beyond the New Testament. These include non-canonical texts (e.g. the so-called Apostolic Fathers, New Testament Apocrypha, Old Testament Pseudepigrapha in Christian usage, Nag Hammadi and associated literature, early patristic texts); and wider historical themes (e.g. orthodoxy and heresy, canon formation, gender, ritual, identity, martyrdom, social setting, material culture).

In 2018, we plan to hold: (1) an open session; (2) a thematic session on martyrdom; (3) an invited paper session on Jesus’ resurrection in the Epistula Apostolorum. For sessions (1) and (2) we invite paper proposals along the lines of the goals of the seminar. For all panels, the abstract should state the paper’s thesis and outline the approach that will be taken.

New Testament and Second Temple Judaism
Susan Docherty (S.E.Docherty@newman.ac.uk)
Matthew Novenson (matthew.novenson@ed.ac.uk)
For the 2018 meeting, we will have a session on current research on 1 Enoch (presenters including Sofanit Abebe and Elena Dugan), a review panel, held jointly with the Paul Seminar, on Jamie Davies’s Paul among the Apocalypses? (Bloomsbury T. & T. Clark, 2016) (reviewers including Elizabeth Shively and Crispin Fletcher-Louis), and one open-call session. For the open-call session, we invite paper proposals on any topic pertinent to the study of the New Testament and Second Temple Judaism.

New Testament: Use and Influence
Alison Jack (a.jack@ed.ac.uk)
John Lyons (w.j.lyons@bristol.ac.uk)
This year, the seminar will offer one ‘open call’ session, for which we would welcome proposals on any topic regarding the use and influence of the NT. The second session will involve an open invitation to BNTC attendees to participate in an organised project session (details of theme to follow). The third session will feature a round-table open discussion on the future/British NT Society future of reception history of the NT.

Paul
Peter Oakes (peter.oakes@manchester.ac.uk)
Dorothee Bertschmann (d.h.bertschmann@durham.ac.uk)
Papers are invited on any aspect of Pauline literature for the two open call sessions. We shall spend one session on a review panel held jointly with the NT and Second Temple Judaism seminar, on Jamie Davies’s Paul among the Apocalypses? (Bloomsbury T. & T. Clark, 2016).

Synoptic Gospels
Andy Angel (vicar@standrewsbh.org.uk)
Elizabeth Shively (ees3@st-andrews.ac.uk)
This year we focus on the intersection of the study of rhetoric and the Synoptic Gospels. First, we plan a joint session with the Book of Acts Seminar for which we invite proposals dealing with various aspects of the study of rhetoric in Luke-Acts. Second, we invite proposals dealing with various aspects of the study of rhetoric in the Synoptic Gospels. Third, we invite proposals on any topic on the Synoptic Gospels for an open session. Paper proposals for the joint session on rhetoric and Luke-Acts and should be sent to Elizabeth Shively. Paper proposals for the Synoptic Gospels sessions should be sent to Andy Angel or Elizabeth Shively, co-chairs of the Synoptic Gospels Seminar.

Simultaneous Short Papers
Steve Walton (steve.walton@cantab.net)
Proposals for 20-25 minute papers are invited for the simultaneous short papers session. Preference will be given to papers that do not easily fit into one of the established seminar groups. Proposing the same paper for this section and one of the seminar groups is not permitted.

Call For Papers: British New Testament Society

CALL FOR PAPERS
The British New Testament Society Annual Conference
St Patrick’s College, Maynooth 31st August – 2nd September 2017

Proposals for papers are invited for the British New Testament Conference 2017 to be held in Maynooth, Ireland from Thursday 31st August – Saturday 2nd September. Paper proposals of not more than 300 words should be sent directly to the relevant Seminar chairs by Friday 21st April 2017. Proposals for the Simultaneous Short Paper session should be sent to the Secretary, Dr Paul Middleton (p.middleton@chester.ac.uk). Specific Seminar Calls for Papers are below.
Book of Acts
Sean Adams (sean.adams@glasgow.ac.uk)
Matthew Sleeman (matthews@oakhill.ac.uk)

We welcome seminar papers approaching Acts from a variety of angles and using a variety of methods: historical, literary, textual-critical, theological, archaeological, the social world, possible links/parallels with other biblical and ancient writings, and so on. We also include topics for discussion which relate Acts to the wider contexts of Luke-Acts and the Pauline corpus, where they are relevant and helpful to the study of Acts. Offers of papers are welcome both from research students (this is a great opportunity to ‘try out’ your ideas) and from more established scholars.

The Acts and Paul seminar groups are happy to announce that they will be having a joint session as one of our three sessions scheduled for the 2017 Conference. In light of this collaboration, we are particularly interested in receiving paper proposals that engage with the theology, genre, structure and/or themes of Paul, Paul’s letters, and Acts.

Papers may require a full seminar session for discussion (90 minutes) or take half a session (45 minutes). We make papers available on the British New Testament Society web site a few weeks before the conference so that seminar members can read them in advance. At the seminar, the paper’s author presents a 10-15 minute summary before discussion, in order to maximise discussion time in the seminar.
Hebrews
David Moffitt (dm206@st-andrews.ac.uk)
Whilst papers on any topic relating to Hebrews will be considered, the Hebrews Group particularly invites proposals relating to the much debated question of the cosmological assumptions underlying this early Christian text.
Jesus
Helen Bond (h.bond@ed.ac.uk)
Justin Meggitt (jjm1000@cam.ac.uk)

This year we will share two sessions with the “NT: Use and Influence” and the “Synoptic Gospels” seminar groups. One of these will be a panel discussion of the Irish writer Colm Toíbín’s novel, The Testament of Mary, with invited participants. Offers of papers for the second shared session are invited on the theme of ”Jesus and Contemporary Media”. Offers of papers are also invited for our third session, on any topic of interest to the “Jesus” seminar group.

Paper proposals for the shared session on “Jesus and Contemporary Media” should be sent to Justin Meggitt, the co-chair of the Jesus seminar group (jjm1000@cam.ac.uk). Paper proposals for the Jesus open session should be sent to Helen Bond (H.Bond@ed.ac.uk) or Justin Meggitt (jjm1000@cam.ac.uk), co-chairs of the Jesus group.
Johannine Literature
Cornelis Bennema (c.bennema@gmail.com)
Janet Unsworth (junsworth@edgehillcollege.org)

The Johannine Literature seminar receives papers on the Gospel of John and/or the Johannine Epistles. Offers of papers are welcome both from established scholars and from research students and the Seminar provides an excellent opportunity for feedback from experts in the field.

This year, one session will be dedicated to the discussion of Troels Engberg-Pedersen’s new book John and Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2017). There will be a panel consisting of Prof. Engberg-Pedersen (University of Copenhagen) who will present his new book, and two respondents. This will be followed by an extended open discussion. In the remaining two sessions, there is scope for four to five papers. Papers are normally 30 minutes, allowing time for questions and discussion, but shorter papers of 20 minutes are also welcome.
The Book of Revelation
Michelle Fletcher (m.e.fletcher@kent.ac.uk)
Simon Woodman (simonw@bloomsbury.org.uk)

The Revelation Seminar welcomes proposals related to the study of the Book of Revelation. We aim for a balance of papers, ranging from textual and exegetical analysis to the reception history of the apocalypse.
New Testament and Early Christianity
Loveday Alexander ‎[l.c.alexander@sheffield.ac.uk]‎
Dominika Kurek-Chomycz ‎[kurekcd@hope.ac.uk]
Francis Watson [francis.watson@dur.ac.uk]

The Early Christianity seminar is issuing an open call for papers for the 2017 BNTS Conference, and welcomes offers of papers on any aspect of the New Testament and early Christianity, especially where these are not covered by other seminar groups. In addition to the open session and an invited paper session, the third session will focus on “Early Christian Eschatology”, and we invite offers of papers on this theme. Priority may be given to papers that engage both canonical and non-canonical texts, or that relate the eschatology of a particular text to a wider context.
New Testament and Second Temple Judaism
Susan Docherty (S.E.Docherty@newman.ac.uk)
Matthew Novenson (matthew.novenson@ed.ac.uk)

The NT and Second Temple Judaism Seminar will have three sessions in 2017, two invited and one open-call. There will be a session on current research in Qumran studies, with papers from Timothy Lim, Joan Taylor, and Benjamin Wold. We will also have a book review session on Matthew Novenson’s The Grammar of Messianism (OUP, 2017) with panelists including Philip Alexander and Grant Macaskill. For the open-call session, we invite papers on any aspect of the study of NT and ancient Judaism, including but not limited to social history, material remains, apocrypha, pseudepigrapha, Qumran, Philo, Josephus, and the rabbis. Interested parties should email paper proposals to both co-chairs.
New Testament: Use and Influence
Chair: Alison Jack (a.jack@ed.ac.uk)
Chair: John Lyons (thwjl@bristol.ac.uk)

This year we will share two sessions with the “Jesus” and the “Synoptic Gospels” Seminar Groups. One of these will be a panel discussion of Colm Toibin’s novel, The Testament of Mary, with invited participants. Offers of papers for the second shared session are invited on the theme of ”Jesus and Contemporary Media”. Offers of papers are also invited for our third session, on any topic of interest to the NT: Use and Influence Seminar Group.
Paul
Peter Oakes (peter.oakes@manchester.ac.uk)
Sarah Whittle (swhittle@nazarene.ac.uk)

Papers are invited on any aspect of Pauline literature.
Social World of the New Testament
Louise Lawrence (L.J.Lawrence@exeter.ac.uk)
Minna Shkul (m.shkul@gmail.com)

In 2017 we are planning to address embodiment of religion and bodies in the NT, more generally. We welcome proposals that examine gender, sex, sexuality, embodied rituals and religious experience in the New Testament and early Christianity, or contemporary lived religion as it arises from or relates to these themes in the NT writings.
Synoptic Gospels
Andy Angel (vicar@standrewsbh.org.uk)
Elizabeth Shively (ees3@st-andrews.ac.uk)

This year we will have two joint sessions with the “Jesus” and the “NT: Use and Influence” Seminar Groups. The first will be a panel discussion of Irish writer Colm Toíbín’s novel, The Testament of Mary, with invited presenters. The second will be on the theme “Jesus and Contemporary Media,” for which we welcome paper proposals. The third will be an open session on any topic in the Synoptic Gospels, for which we also welcome paper proposals.

Paper proposals for the joint session on “Jesus and Contemporary Media” should be sent to Justin Meggitt, co-chair of the “Jesus” Seminar Group. Paper proposals for the Synoptic Gospels open session should be sent to Andy Angel or Elizabeth Shively, co-chairs of the “Synoptic Gospels” Seminar Group.
Simultaneous Short Papers
Paul Middleton (p.middleton@chester.ac.uk)

Proposals for 20-25 minute papers are invited for the simultaneous short papers session. Preference will be given to papers that do not easily fit into one of the established seminar groups. Proposing the same paper for this section and one of the seminar groups is not permitted.

Via Paul Middleton

The May Biblioblog Carnival of British Biblical Goodness

amenThis month’s carnival has a British flavor:  every post is by a British scholar (or one who has been to Britain or who has family from Britain or ancestors therefrom or who has flown over Britain on their way to Europe or who has seen Britain on a map in the fifth grade).

Hebrew Bible From a British Point of View

Jim Davila, who blogs on Hebrew Bible from the land of the Britons, posted the following interesting snippets: Major grant for the Early Manuscripts Electronic Library.  He also had a snippet on the Epic of Gilgamesh.

Eva Mroczek has words to say about the literary imagination in Jewish antiquity in a “Frankely Judaic” podcast from the Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies. The host of “Frankely Judaic” is Jeremy Shere.

Will Ross, a student of Jim Aitken’s at Cambridge, posted an interview with Tov.  Meanwhile, Tim Bulkeley, who says he’s British (so why does he live in Australia then?), posted on David’s story.

He’s just across the channel from Britain, so he’s nearly British.  He?  Michael Langlois, who posted about a DSS conference that also includes talk of the Samaritan Pentateuch.

trump_johnsonTripp Fuller illustrates the tragic state of biblical studies as publicity questing in a post nearly everyone should visit (to see an example of biblical studies as publicity questing) since it features some of the best questers in the ‘business’ of biblical studies… on the devil.  The post title?  Devilpalooza.  Of course.

The Dutchlanders have a review of a new edition of an older book that if you’re a reader of Dutchlandish or English you may want to read.  I’ll just leave it at that.

Matthew Lynch informs us that he has posted an interview with Brennan Breed on his book ‘Nomadic Text: A Theory of Biblical Reception History’ on his blog along with a six part blog series on violence in Joshua for another blog.  Here’s a link to the 6th post, which includes links to the others.

Chiara Peri blogged a bit about the Festschrift presented to Prof. Giovanni Garbini.  There are also, additionally, some photos of the event at the Pontifical Biblical Institute here.  Garbini has deserved a FS for a very long time.  I’m thrilled he finally got one.  And it’s an excellent one at that.

Chris Heard posted on the Walking Dead.  Oh that’s right.  That’ll get you over there.  (And yes, Chris is British.  Or at least his name is…  That’s what I Heard).

William Ross has started reviewing a grammar of the Septuagint.  He begins by stating Septuagint scholars everywhere are rejoicing to finally have a brand new, full grammar of the Greek Old Testament at hand.  He’s right.  Just last night there was a parade here in the middle of our small village and everyone was carrying their copy raised above their heads saying ‘forget the atv ride this weekend, we’re going to read this book!’

The New Testament as Seen Through British Eyes

09dvd-1-650Richard Goode posted this invitation on the Newman University blog.  Of course it’s too late for you to go now but if the St. John’s Bible is ever in your neighborhood, you should make seeing it a priority.

Brant Barber exegetes the Pentecost passages in a video production that’s far more engaging than Trek Wars or any of the other SciFi stuff spewed from Hollywood these days.  And he does it in English just like the British speak.

Phil Long(bowstockinghatnessshire) reviewed a book by someone with an initial and then a name and a last name (those are the important folk don’t ya know- the three name people) on 400 questions about the historical Jesus.  It’s a good review.  The book, though, sounds like rubbish.

James *The Editor* Spinti posted a neat little series of Greeky goodness:
http://anebooks.blogspot.com/2016/05/about-those-deponent-verbs.html
http://anebooks.blogspot.com/2016/05/middle-voice-yes-in-greek.html
http://anebooks.blogspot.com/2016/05/summary-of-deponent-verbs.html

Ben Myers (who usually dabbles in Church fathery sorts of uninteresting things except when he’s talking about Jerome, the only Church Father worth reading) has posted a guest review of Hays’ fairly recent book on the Gospels.

R.R. has continued his multi-segment examination of Bart Ehrman’s latest book.  Read all five parts.  I think a 6th is coming soon as well.

Matt Lynch declares that there’s an “OnScript podcast” interview with Joel Green on his book ‘Conversion in Luke-Acts’.

Ninja Gupta has some interesting observations about Clarke’s book on literacy in the Roman world.  Don’t pass it by.  It’s silent, but deadly interesting.

The Brits are having a Brit at a Brit conference with Richard ‘The Brit’ Bauckham on Jesus at St Mary’s in London.  June 10-11.  All the details are here.  And here.

Mid May was the anniversary of the publication of Westcott and Hort’s Greek New Testament.  And a pretty nifty blogpost resulted.

wrightA-J Levine lectured on Jesus and gender at Vanderbilt and Deane, who is sort of British (because he lives in New Zealand) posted the video of it.  Whilst I’m a big fan of A-J I continue to be unimpressed by the present spate of discussions about Jesus and sexuality.  It’s all nothing but the purest (and in too many cases, puerile) speculation.  We know Jesus was a male and that he opposed sexual impurity.  That’s it.  Everything else that anyone says about his gender or views is rank guesswork and always says more about the guesser than history or Jesus.

Mark Goodacre (he’s British, that’s why he doesn’t believe in Q like godly people do) was recognized, justifiably, by Duke for his excellent teaching skills.  Congrats, Mark.  Mark hasn’t actually blogged anything in months, though, so his appearance here is merely congratulatory and not blog-commendable-icative.

Larry Hurtado has some ideas about the Messiah and the ‘Divine Son’.  Classic Hurtado.  Good stuff.  And he doesn’t even have a British accent!  (As we all know, if you speak with a British accent people in America believe everything you say even if you don’t know what you’re talking about.  Larry knows what he’s talking about.)

The Jesus Blog people (all of them are Brits) posted a bit on- surprise- Jesus.  And liberals and anti-semitism.  Read the post, skip the comments.  Someone over there needs to apply the fine sieve filter to keep the mythicist nutbaggers out.

Tragically, word of the demise of Dennis Nineham in early May caused sadness across the world of New Testament scholarship.  As did the tragic news of D. Moody Smith’s death as well.  And at the end of the month we were all very saddened by word of the death of John Webster, one of the most impressive of all theologians.  One of his colleagues posted this remembrance.

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Do Brits Do Archaeology Blogging?

The Palestine Exploration Fund does.  Just not a lot.  And Jim Davila does.  Sometimes.  Like this- where he has a note on the ‘great revolt’ and an archaeological discovery connected thereto.  And sometimes when he points to stories like this about Israel’s IAA cracking down on looters.

And the folk at Tell Halif do.  So be sure to follow the doings there this summer.

Want to know how NOT to reference archaeology in connection with biblical studies?  This Norwegian Prof of Communications and Worldview (whatever that is) shows the not-way.  He enfleshes absolutely everything that’s wrong with ‘biblical archaeology’ including circular reasoning, outmoded methodologies, and amateurism.

Not, strictly speaking, from a Biblioblog- but worth noting because the practice of looting antiquities and selling them to collectors continues to be a massive problem  And Roberta Mazza pointed it out.  So, for that reason alone…  enjoy.

Don’t miss this post: mapping terrorist destruction of archaeological sites.  It’s must see.

Miscellaneous British Observations

titanicJames Crossley interviewed someone who is a satirist about something related to politics or something.  It’s totally British. He also launched a revised edition of his chaotic book where things are harnessed and politicians examined in great detail.

Helen Ingram has some salient observations about Higher Ed in the UK.  It’s must reading.  And Helen Sarah Bond (no relation to Helen Ingram or James Bond) has put together a list of women in Classical studies.  It’s something to behold.

Darryl P. had some really interesting things to say about translations of the Bible.  Well not actually Darryl, but Scot.  But I found it on Darryl and so he is the one what must be cited.  Darryl is the British spelling of Darrell or Darrel.  I think.  Who knows.

Til Magnus Steiner (a hearty British name if ever there was one) pointed out an essay which has some interesting ideas about clericalism in the early Church.  Practice your English and give it a read!

Lloyd Pietersen gave a lecture on the loons of Munster.  This is relevant for biblical studies and belongs in a biblical studies carnival because the loons of Munster show what happens when dilettantes who shouldn’t be allowed within 10 miles of the Bible not only get access to it, but convince others that their reading is the right one.

***

Finis

insideThere’s a so called ‘official’ carnival over here at some guy named Brian’s site.  Visit it if you must and you don’t love God and the truth (which can only be found here).

Well that’s it.  We have examined every worthwhile British biblical studies post as they appeared during the month of May from absolutely everywhere on the interweb.  Tune in next month for our next Avignonian Carnival.  It’s Summer, so we’ll be diving into the pool…

BNTS 2016 Conference Registration is Open

The British New Testament Conference 2016
BOOKING NOW OPEN

Colleagues,

Booking is now open for this year’s British New Testament Conference, which will be held at the University of Chester from Thursday 1st – Saturday 3rd September. We have been able to freeze the cost of the conference at £210 residential and £140 non-residential. Please note, this ‘early bird’ rate ends on the 30th June. From the 1st July the cost rises to £230/£160, so do book early. You can book here: http://storefront.chester.ac.uk/index.php… or via our society web pages: http://www.bnts.org.uk

As is usually the case, you will have to create an account to register, but it is quite straight forward. Don’t forget to choose your seminar group. There is a dedicated email address for enquiries: BNTC@chester.ac.uk. Please do not reply to this email.

Chester is well served by rail (just 20 mins from Crewe) and road (M56 and M53 are very near) . The University is about a 20 minute walk or a short taxi journey from the station. For those looking to book trains well in advance, we anticipate registration being available from around 3.30pm. The conference will end after lunch on Saturday (lunch is at 1pm).

A reminder that the Call for Papers is open until 15th April 2016, further details on the Society’s web page. We are delighted that our three plenary speakers will be:

  • Prof. Loveday Alexander: Did Jesus Found a Church? Matthew 16.18 and the Ecclesiology of the Gospels
  • Dr Christine Joynes: Power and Prejudice: Reviewing the Reception of Mark’s Gospel
  • Dr John Lyons “Neither Science nor Prayer Can Heal Them”: How the ‘New Testament’ Shaped the Deaf at St Saviour’s Church, Oxford Street

In addition, we will be holding a plenary discussing How might New Testament Studies flourish in the next generation? Details to follow. The team are looking forward to welcoming the conference to Chester for the first time.

Best wishes,
Paul
Dr Paul Middleton
Secretary, The British New Testament Society

Academic Position

Via BNTS

Applications are invited for the post of Senior Lecturer in Biblical Studies in the Department for Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies. The post holder will teach across a range of undergraduate modules in the area of Biblical Studies and will work with the Head of Department and staff team to deliver courses to lay members of congregations working at pre-Foundation degree level. This part-time post is suitable for an early career academic with a strong desire to focus on teaching and to undertake research.

You will have demonstrable evidence of delivering high quality, effective and imaginative teaching in the area of Biblical Studies and its interaction with contemporary Western culture. The successful candidate will be an excellent teacher at undergraduate and possibly postgraduate level.  You will also be aware of the training needs of local church groups and be able to develop materials for the University’s ‘Engaging Christianity’ course.  The option exists of being a part of the department’s research focus on public and popular theology.  You will also contribute to the department’s recruitment strategies and activities with a view to growing undergraduate numbers.

Informal enquiries about the recruitment process are welcomed by Dr Graeme Smith on 01243 816191 or email G.Smith@chi.ac.uk.  Closing Date: Wednesday, 1 October 2014.  Interview Date:  Friday, 17 October 2014.  Further details including how to apply are here: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AJN670/senior-lecturer-in-biblical-studies/

Job Openings: In Barbados

Via Paul Middleton of BNTS

CODRINGTON COLLEGE, the Theological College of the Church in the Province of the West Indies, invites applications for the following full-time appointments to commence in the 2014-2015 academic year:-

  1. Lecturer in Biblical Studies (Old and New Testament)
  2. Lecturer in Pastoral Studies
  3. Lecturer in Theological & Religious StudiesEligibility: The successful candidate will be involved in the priestly formation programme of the Church in the Province of the West Indies.  Preference will be given to suitably qualified Clergy of the Anglican/Episcopal Church.

    Education:  Preferably a Doctor of Philosophy in the respective area, but at minimum a Master of Philosophy degree or its equivalent in (1) Either Old or New Testament Studies, (2) Pastoral Studies, (3) Either Systematic Theology or Religious Studies.

    Required knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

  1. Must exude a high degree of performance in the methodical preparation and presentation of lectures in the area of Biblical studies (Old and New Testament Theology thought) at undergraduate and postgraduate level; demonstrated expertise in research and writing in Biblical thought; and must be capable of teaching Biblical Hebrew and/or Biblical Greek to undergraduate or postgraduate level. Knowledge of the literature of the inter-testamental period, Qumran and the apocryphas would be an asset.
  2. Must exude a high degree of performance in the methodical preparation and presentation of lectures in the area of Pastoral Studies at undergraduate and postgraduate level; demonstrated expertise in research and writing up of case studies and verbatims; should have completed at least four (4) units of Clinical Pastoral Education.  Must be able to deal with pastoral and sensitive issues concerning students and provide support as required.
  3. Must exude a high degree of performance in the methodical preparation and presentation of lectures in the area of Theological and Religious Studies at undergraduate and postgraduate level; demonstrated expertise in research and writing either in Systematic Theological or Religious thought; and must be capable of embracing wide churchmanship.
General:
  •  The successful candidates must have strong communication, teaching and interpersonal relationship skills and be willing to spend time with, and supervising students preparing for ordination; must be prepared to assist with the supervision of practical work of the students of the College, and must be willing to work with the extension programme of the College to the laity of the Province.
  • The ability to maintain confidentiality and manage confidential information and to identify and utilise ‘best practice’ for learning in the relevant subject area.
  • Ability to undertake any other duties as may be reasonably required.
  • Terms and conditions of employment are determined by the Codrington Trust and additional information may be obtained from the Principal’s Office.  Remuneration will be commensurate with the candidates’ qualifications and experience.
  • Interested persons should submit a written application letter accompanied by a Curriculum Vitae and contact information for two references, along with statements of research and teaching interests by August 15, 2014 to ian.rock@codrington.org or to The Revd’ Dr. Ian E. Rock, Principal, Codrington College, c/o. Codrington Trust, St. John BB2007, Barbados.
  • The College reserves the right to contact only those applicants who have been shortlisted.

News Items From the British New Testament Society

First, there’s this-

Colleagues,
A quick reminder that those who are interested to join sessions of the Rylands papyri conference on the Friday afternoon of BNTC must register through the Eventbrite link in the conference website.  Space is limited, so I’m afraid there is no room for spontaneity on the day!  http://www.library.manchester.ac.uk/jrri/conferences/header-max-160-chars-308128-en.htm
Best wishes,
Paul
Dr Paul Middleton
Secretary, The British New Testament Society
And then there’s this
The University of Münster (Germany) wishes to appoint a
Research Fellow (Doctoral or Post-Doctoral Position)
within the Cluster of Excellence “Religion and Politics in Modern and Pre-Modern Cultures”, research project C2-24 “Integration and Diversification in the Judaism of Palestine during the Hellenistic-Roman Period (300 BCE–135 CE)” under the direction of Prof. Dr. Lutz Doering.
 
This three-year temporary position is scheduled to start on October 1st, 2014, and will run until September 30th, 2017. According to the German collective labour agreement for public sector employees (TV-L E 13), the gross salary for the position starts at approximately 1680 € per month (doctoral position, 50%) or 3360 € (post-doctoral position, 100%) during the first year. The regular working hours amount to 19 hours and 55 minutes (doctoral position) or 39 hours and 50 minutes (post-doctoral position) per week.
 
The Cluster of Excellence “Religion and Politics in Modern and Pre-Modern Cultures” was established at the University of Münster in 2007 and has been awarded funding through the German Excellence Initiative until 2017. Some 200 academics from 20 disciplines within the humanities and the social sciences examine the sensitive relationship between religion and politics, which has shaped all ages and cultures. Research projects are divided into the fields of research normativity, mediality, integrative procedures, and violence. For more information on the structures and research outline of the Cluster, please refer to http://www.uni-muenster.de/Religion-und-Politik/en/forschung/.

Standard duties:

·                Participation in the research project C2-24 “Integration and Diversification in the Judaism of Palestine during the Hellenistic-Roman Period (300 BCE–135 CE)”.
 
Research Fellows are expected to pursue their academic career (doctoral thesis, post-doctoral publications) in conjunction with the duties pertaining to the position.

Qualifications, knowledge and experiences:

·                Above-average MA or equivalent (doctoral position) or PhD or equivalent (post-doctoral position; completed or near completion) in Theology (especially Biblical Studies), Jewish Studies, Ancient History or related disciplines
·                Profound knowledge of Ancient (especially Koine) Greek and Post-Biblical Hebrew (Qumran, Rabbinic literature); desirable: reading proficiency in Modern Hebrew
·                Interest in work on a topic in the area of Ancient Judaism leading to a doctoral thesis or to post-doctoral publications, respectively.

The University of Münster is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to increasing the proportion of women academics. Consequently, we actively encourage applications by women. Female candidates with equivalent qualifications and academic achievements will be preferentially considered within the framework of the legal possibilities.

Among applicants of equal qualifications and equal position-relevant skills, disabled candidates will be given preference unless other candidate-related reasons prevail.

Applications should include a cover letter, CV, degree transcripts, statement of research interests, and names/addresses of two referees within a single PDF document, and to be submitted by August 15th, 2014 to:
 
Prof. Dr. Lutz Doering
Institutum Judaicum
Wilmergasse 1
D-48163 Münster
Germany
Enquiries regarding this position may be directed by email to Prof. Doering.