Zwinglius Redivivus

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Zwingli’s Private Library

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This …. Must have….

The Swiss theologian Huldrych Zwingli (1484–1531) was one of the most prominent reformers and the founder of the Reformed Protestant Church in the Swiss Confederation. During the last hundred years more than 200 titles from his private library have been discovered. They give an interesting insight into his interests and sources. The present book contains not only an extensive introduction and a catalogue of these books and manuscripts, but also an inventory of the lost works possessed by Zwingli. They open the door to Zwingli’s study and to the intellectual world of an important reformer.

Written by Jim

16 Oct 2018 at 3:50 am

Posted in Modern Culture

Zwingli: On the Perpetrators of Fraud

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If it is found that he [i.e., someone] has gained his ends fraude egisse, i.e., by fraud, one owes him no more than the Romans did Jugurtha, who by means of bribes sought to have the murder of his own brothers entirely disregarded, of which he boasted openly when leaving Rome, saying: “Oh this venal city! A merchant could attain anything he pleased if he only had enough money”; and in fact Jugurtha could have proved the truth of his own words if the upright Metellus Numidicus had not defeated and overthrown him on several occasions and thus seriously injured his cause; for too long a period had Jugurtha bred treachery in Rome by means of his money. And finally he fell into the hands of the Romans. Thus, in accordance with the proverb, “deceit turns upon its own creator,” and it is well thus when someone attempts to commit treachery and does something behind the back of upright people. — Huldrych Zwingli

Written by Jim

15 Oct 2018 at 4:48 am

Posted in Theology, Zwingli

Kappel and Zwingli

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Written by Jim

13 Oct 2018 at 8:50 am

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Zwingli: The Smartest Guy in the Room

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zwingli_marignanoIt is a great work to believe that Christ, nailed to the cross, is the Son of God. That this is the work of God, Christ Himself testified, Jn. 6:29: “This is the work of God, that ye believe on him whom he hath sent.” As many, then, as trust in Christ are built upon a rock, which no blasts of winds can shake, no inundating floods wash away. And as many as are built upon this are the church of Christ, for He Himself said “my.” But His church cannot be impure and wrinkled. Therefore it follows that those who trust in Christ are without spot and without wrinkle, for they summon up all their zeal to the end that they may not fall back into sin, in which beforetime they were dead, Rom. 6:2. But they who do not this utter noble thunderings with their lips, but by their deeds betray Christ, with the result that through them the name of God is in bad repute.

This is the church that cannot err—an attribute which the pontiffs arrogate to themselves with as much falseness as impudence. For this church rests upon the word of God alone, which is so firm and immovable that heaven and earth must pass away sooner than one jot of it [Mt. 5:18]. On the contrary, the church of the pontiffs rests upon its own word. They run, indeed, as if they had been sent by the Lord, but they speak visions, that is, things pleasing to their own heart [Jer. 23:16]. Hence they spread nothing but darkness before poor wretches’ eyes.

Written by Jim

11 Oct 2018 at 4:13 pm

Posted in Theology, Zwingli

On The Anniversary of Zwingli’s Death Each Year…

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That is, on 11 October, this is the passage read:

Schau herab vom Himmel und sieh herab von der Wohnung deiner Heiligkeit und deiner Herrlichkeit! Wo sind dein Eifer und deine Kraft? Das Aufwallen deiner Gefühle und dein Erbarmen – mir hast du es nicht gezeigt.  Du bist doch unser Vater! Abraham hat nichts von uns gewusst, und Israel kennt uns nicht. Du, HERR, bist unser Vater, Unser-Erlöser-seit-uralten-Zeiten ist dein Name.

Warum, HERR, lässt du uns umherirren, fern von deinen Wegen, verhärtest unser Herz, so dass wir dich nicht fürchten? Kehre zurück um deiner Diener, um der Stämme deines Erbbesitzes willen.  Für eine kurze Zeit haben sie dein heiliges Volk enteignet, dein Heiligtum haben unsere Feinde zertreten.  Wir sind wie die geworden, über die du nie geherrscht hast, über denen dein Name nicht ausgerufen wurde. Hättest du doch schon den Himmel zerrissen, wärst schon herabgestiegen, so dass die Berge vor dir erbebt wären,  (Isa 63:15-19 ZUR)

Written by Jim

11 Oct 2018 at 12:45 pm

Posted in Church History, Zwingli

Luther Was Glad When He Heard of Zwingli’s Death- Because He Hated Him

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In a most enlightening footnote, Schaff writes

The deepest ground of Luther’s aversion to Zwingli must be sought in his mysticism and veneration for what he conceived to be the unbroken faith of the Church. He strikingly expressed this in his letter to Duke Albrecht of Prussia (which might easily be turned into a powerful argument against the Reformation itself).

He went so far as to call Zwingli a non-Christian (Unchrist), and ten times worse than a papist (March, 1528, in his Great Confession on the Lord’s Supper). His personal interview with him at Marburg (October, 1529) produced no change, but rather intensified his dislike.

He saw in the heroic death of Zwingli and the defeat of the Zurichers at Cappel (1531) a righteous judgment of God, and found fault with the victorious Papists for not exterminating his heresy (Wider etliche Rottengeister, Letter to Albrecht of Prussia, April, 1532, in De Wette’s edition of L. Briefe, Vol. IV. pp. 352, 353).

And even shortly before his death, unnecessarily offended by a new publication of Zwingli’s works, he renewed the eucharistic controversy in his Short Confession on the Lord’s Supper (1544, in Welch’s edition, Vol. XX. p. 2195), in which he abused Zwingli and Oecolampadius as heretics, liars, and murderers of souls, and calls the Reformed generally ‘eingeteufelte [ἐνδιαβολισθέντες], durchteufelte, überteufelte lästerliche Herzen und Lügenmäuler.’ No wonder that even the gentle Melanchthon called this a ‘most atrocious book,’ and gave up all hope for union (letter to Bullinger, Aug. 30, 1544, in Corp. Reform. Vol. V. p. 475: ‘Atrocissimum Lutheri scriptum, in quo bellum περὶ δείπνου κυριακοῦ instaurat;’ comp. also his letter to Bucer, Aug. 28, 1544, in Corp. Reform. Vol. V. p. 474, both quoted also by Gieseler, Vol. IV. p. 412, note 38, and p. 434, note 37).*

You should always read the footnotes.  Luther could be the vilest of men, offensive even to his closest friends- and not just in his attitude towards the Jews.  Equally vile are all the modern haters of Zwingli, because they hate him without cause.  And nothing is more vile, more wicked, and more un-christian than hating someone with whom you aren’t even really familiar.

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*The Creeds of Christendom, with a History and Critical Notes: The History of Creeds (Vol. 1).

Written by Jim

11 Oct 2018 at 10:13 am

Posted in Luther, Zwingli

Zwingli the Translator

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Worth remembering ozwingli_laptopn the anniversary of his vicious murder- Zwingli was a scholar who translated the Bible.

There’s a great little essay in Nota Bene that you ought to take a look at.  It’s about Zwingli and the Bible translation and exposition he did.  It’s grandly done.

Written by Jim

11 Oct 2018 at 9:33 am

Posted in Zwingli

Zwingli, Zwingli, Zwingli…

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Because many know little of him-

Written by Jim

11 Oct 2018 at 6:58 am

Posted in Zwingli

It’s The Anniversary of Zwingli’s Death

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So here it is, once more- Bullinger’s account:

On the battlefield, not far from the line of attack, Mr. Ulrich Zwingli lay under the dead and wounded. While men were looting . . . he was still alive, lying on his back, with his hands together as if he was praying, and his eyes looking upwards to heaven. So some approached who did not know him and asked him, since he was so weak and close to death (for he had fallen in combat and was stricken with a mortal wound), whether a priest should be fetched to hear his confession. Thereat Zwingli shook his head, said nothing and looked up to heaven. Later they told him that if he was no longer able to speak or confess he should yet have the mother of God in his heart and call on the beloved saints to plead to God for grace on his behalf. Again Zwingli shook his head and continued gazing straight up to heaven. At this the Catholics grew impatient, cursed him and said that he was one of the obstinate cantankerous heretics and should get what he deserved. Then Captain Fuckinger of Unterwalden appeared and in exasperation drew his sword and gave Zwingli a thrust from which he at once died. So the renowned Mr. Ulrich Zwingli, true minister and servant of the churches of Zurich, was found wounded on the battlefield along with his flock (with whom he remained until his death). There, because of his confession of the true faith in Christ, our only savior, the mediator and advocate of all believers, he was killed by a captain who was a pensioner, one of those against whom he had always preached so eloquently. . . .

The crowd then [Oct. 12] spread it abroad throughout the camp that anyone who wanted to denounce Zwingli as a heretic and betrayer of a pious confederation should come onto the battlefield. There, with great contempt, they set up a court of injustice on Zwingli which decided that his body should be quartered and the portions burned. All this was carried into effect by the executioner from Lucerne with abundance of abuse; among other things he said that although some had asserted that Zwingli was a sick man he had in fact never seen a more healthy-looking body.

They threw into the fire the entrails of some pigs that had been slaughtered the previous night and then they turned over the embers so that the pigs’ offal was mixed with Zwingli’s ashes. This was done close to the high road to Scheuren.

Verdicts on Zwingli from scholars and ignorant alike were varied. All those who knew him were constant in their praises. Even so there were still more who were critical either because they really did not know him or, if they had known him a little, were determined to show their resentment and spoke ill of him. (Janz, A Reformation reader : Primary texts with introductions.)

Written by Jim

11 Oct 2018 at 12:55 am

Posted in Church History, Zwingli

Zwingli’s Death

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Zwingli's Death at KappelZwingli perished on 11 October, 1531.  Here’s how he spent his last moments:

In the faithful discharge of his duty as chaplain he was stooping down to offer a consoling word to a fallen comrade when a large stone, hurled by a Waldstätter, struck him on the side of the head, near the temple, and he sank insensible to the ground. When he regained consciousness and attempted to rise, a soldier who was passing by stabbed him with his spear. Contemplating the wound, as his life-blood flowed from it, he exclaimed, “What does it matter! They may kill the body, but they cannot kill the soul.”  These were his last words.

zwingli_deathAfter the battle, a Forester searching among the dead and wounded approached the spot where Zwingli lay. The Reformer’s hands were clasped and his eyes, which were directed toward heaven, wore the fixed expression of one hovering between life and death. In the dim light of his torch the Forester perceived that the wounded man’s lips were moving as if in prayer. Not knowing that it was Zwingli, he offered to fetch a priest to absolve his sins. Unable to speak, Zwingli declined the offer by a slight motion of his head. By this time a little group had assembled around the fallen but unrecognized Reformer, and inferring that he was of the Reformed faith from his continued refusal to accept priestly mediation, all joined in reviling him.

At length one of the bystanders, an officer from Unterwalden, more zealous and cruel than the others, drew his sword and gave the dying man a fatal thrust. Thus, in the very prime of manhood, in the very flower of his usefulness, perished the Reformer of Zurich, the man who, as co-laborer with Luther in the Reformation of the Church, is entitled to share with him in large measure the credit and distinction of having been the founder of the movement.*

zwingli_bio

You can check out more stuff from and about Zwingli here.  That should give you something to do on this lovely Saturday while you’re between ballgames and hotdogs.  And if you’re looking for a simple yet accurate (i.e., one that isn’t skewed by Lutheran misinformation) biography of Zwingli, then this is for you.  Or if you’re a Logos user, you can check it out here.

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*Life of Ulrich Zwingli: The Swiss Patriot and Reformer (pp. 273–275).

Written by Jim

11 Oct 2018 at 12:01 am

Posted in Zwingli

Zwingli and the Re-Baptizers, In His Own Words

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hubmaier“Balthasar of Waldshut has fallen into prison here—a man not merely irreverent and unlearned, but even empty. Learn the sum of the matter. When he came to Zurich our Council fearing lest he should cause a commotion ordered him to be taken into custody. Since, however, he had once in freakishness of disposition and fatuity, blurted out in Waldshut against our Council, of which place he, by the gods, was a guardian [i. e., he was pastor there], until the stupid fellow disunited and destroyed everything, it was determined that I should discuss with him in a friendly manner the baptising of infants and Catabaptists, as he earnestly begged first from prison and afterwards from custody. I met the fellow and rendered him mute as a fish. The next day he recited a recantation in the presence of certain Councillors appointed for the purpose [which recantation when repeated to the Two Hundred it was ordered should be publicly made. Therefore having started to write it in the city, he gave it to the Council with his own hand, with all its silliness, as he promised. At length he denied that he had changed his opinion, although he had done so before a Swiss tribunal, which with us is a capital offence, affirming that his signature had been extorted from him by terror, which was most untrue].

“The Council was so unwilling that force should be used on him that when the Emperor or Ferdinand twice asked that the fellow be given to him it refused the request. Indeed he was not taken prisoner that he might suffer the penalty of his boldness in the baptismal matter, but to prevent his causing in secret some confusion, a thing he delighted to do. Then he angered the Council; for there were present most upright Councillors who had witnessed his most explicit and unconstrained withdrawal, and had refused to hand him over to the cruelty of the Emperor, helping themselves with my aid. The next day he was thrust back into prison and tortured. It is clear that the man had become a sport for demons, so he recanted not frankly as he had promised, nay he said that he entertained no other opinions than those taught by me, execrated the error and obstinacy of the Catabaptists, repeated this three times when stretched on the rack, and bewailed his misery and the wrath of God which in this affair was so unkind. Behold what wantonness! Than these men there is nothing more foolhardy, deceptive, infamous—for I cannot tell you what they devise in Abtzell—and shameless. To-morrow or next day the case will come up.”*

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*Samuel Macauley Jackson, Huldreich Zwingli: The Reformer of German Switzerland (1484–1531) (Heroes of the Reformation; New York; London: G. P. Putnam’s Sons; Knickerbocker Press, 1901), 249–250.

Written by Jim

9 Oct 2018 at 7:28 am

Posted in Church History, Zwingli

Today With Zwingli: In The Midst of Writing the ‘Commentary on True and False Religion’

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932801In the Preface and the Address to the Reader, Zwingli tells how he came to write the Commentary.  “Many men in Italy and more in France, learned and devout,” urged him “to write out in Latin his religious views for them.” The request probably was made when Farel, Anton du Blet, and other men from Lyons came to Zurich in the spring of 1524. He shrank in “modesty” from such an undertaking, but “the high standing and importunity” of the men constrained him to yield to their wishes. He was prevented, however, by “various occupations” from beginning the task before the latter part of the year 1524.

In a letter to Zwingli, dated October 7, 1524, Anton Papilio assumes that the former had undertaken to write a book, entitled, De vera et falsa religione commentarius. Having put his hand to the pen, he toiled incessantly, “sweating night and day for three and a half months”—a comparatively short time for so weighty a treatise. He regrets the fact that he was “so hurried all along, that I often hardly had a chance to reread what I had written, much less to correct or embellish it.” The author was now in the “forty-second year of his age.”  The book came from the press at the end of March, 1525.*

To this day if you wish to know what Zwingli believed about nearly everything, this is the book to read. It is his ‘Institutes of the Christian Religion’.

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*George Warren Richards, “Introduction,” in The Latin Works of Huldreich Zwingli (ed. Clarence Nevin Heller; vol. 3; Philadelphia: Heidelberg Press, 1929), 31–2.

Written by Jim

7 Oct 2018 at 8:51 am

Plottings and Schemes Against Zwingli

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zwingli198When priests and monks had been degraded from their positions (so to speak) and a mandate had been issued against the pensioners as we call them, the enemy turned to plots to try if by any means they might destroy the man. I will be silent about the secret plots that may be known to me, and will tell you about those known to people in general. Some one came to his house after midnight and prayed him to come to a man at the point of death. The deacon replying for the master of the house that he would do whatever was necessary himself (for Zwingli was not to be disturbed during the night because of his daily duties), the visitor objected so strongly that the suspicions of the deacon were aroused that he had some plot on foot.

The deacon therefore, going as if he would tell his master all about it, frustrated the marauder by closing the door and leaving him outside. In the morning the facts were discovered, that he was to have been gagged and carried away secretly in a boat. Shortly after a horse was got ready to be used for the same purpose.

Again we saw a waylayer (it was said he was from Zug) in the city girded with the longest kind of sword openly wandering about without a cloak watching for a favourable opportunity to run across the man and kill him. The man was reported and taken into custody, and disappeared.

And one of my favorites

Two Zurichers under the influence of liquor—I will not mention their names though I know them—threw stones one night against Zwingli’s house and breaking his windows behaved so cruelly, basely, and inhumanly with their shouts and curses and blows that none of the neighbours dared to protest even through the windows. So they kept on till they had used up their stones, their words, and their strength.

The tumult was reported to the mayor in the morning, the gates were shut and armed men searched for the offenders in vain in every nook and cranny of the city until certain prostitutes who knew about their hiding places, not being adepts in concealing, unintentionally betrayed one of them; the other had already escaped.

The fellow was dragged from the wine cask of a certain priest and taken to prison by the enraged crowd. After many trials he was condemned to perpetual imprisonment, and for some weeks he lay in captivity until he was released by request of Bern.

And again

Zwingli sometimes dined away from home with friends or entertainers. Therefore returning he was almost always escorted, without being aware of it, by good citizens, lest evil should befall him on the way. And the Senate in this perilous time placed watchers around his house at night.

And finally, concerning the pension he received from Rome which certain unsavory characters in our day use as a cudgel with which to beat the poor dead man, not satisfied with respecting his work and instead endeavoring only to besmirch the deceased in order to make him a toady of the same Antichrist they serve-

See, I beseech you, what unjust accusations were brought against the man that he should have to be protected in this way! They called him “a pensionary” because not knowing it was wrong he received at one time an annual pension from the Roman pontiff. He himself indeed excused this offence to his Germans thus: “The dealings which I once had with the Pope ceased years ago. I thought then it was allowable to receive a pension from the pontiff to defend his way. But having realised the sin of it, I gave up the whole business. Therefore the deputies (factores), as they are called, accuse me of wrong in the matter, and being angry at my giving up the pension, impute to me what I have done as a sin because they persuade men that by receiving the pontifical pension they serve God.”

And to Berthold Haller and Caspar Megander, he thus writes of the gifts of princes: “I esteem the glory of Christ and if you prefer mine own also more than all the wealth of all the princes, not to mention the moderate munificence of one king. In times past I have learned what gifts meant, so that in old age desire after them is not possible.”

[From the biography of Zwingli by Oswald Myconius]

Written by Jim

6 Oct 2018 at 8:49 am

Posted in Church History, Zwingli

Preliminary Details of the 2019 Zwingli Congress in Zurich, February 6-8

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The Congress kicks off at noon on Wednesday, February 6 with light refreshments, followed by papers by the likes of Emidio Campi, Martin Sallmann, Matthias Freudenberg, Amy Burnett and others.  Thursday begins in the morning with papers by Peter Opitz and Christoph Strohm along with Herman Selderhuis and others.  After lunch we pick up again with W.P. Stephens and Pierrick Hildebrand and Daniel Timmermann and several more.  After dinner we meet up at the theater for a private showing of the Zwingli film coming out in 2019.  This may be the highlight of the Congress.

Papers pick back up on Friday morning with Christian Hild and others presenting and after a brief break Bruce Gordon and Volker Leppin deliver the goods.  Sessions after lunch include those led by Christian Moser, Joe Mock, Luca Baschera, Urs Leu, and some guy named Jim West.

Things come to an end with a Plenum by the organizers and then we’re treated Friday evening to an Organ Concert at the Fraumünster given by Niklaus Peter.

In due course flyers will be circulated and interested folk can check out all the paper details and Congress details.

It’s going to be brilliant.  It’s such an honor to be included.  More anon.

Written by Jim

4 Oct 2018 at 12:43 pm

Time Together With ‘Zwingli’s Wife’

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Oh man…  I need to be rich so I can jet off to these things!

Im Januar kommt – 500 Jahre nach seinem Amtsantritt in Zürich – Ulrich Zwingli in die Kinos. Es ist eine der grössten Schweizer Filmproduktionen und wir freuen uns darauf, den Event mit verschiedenen Anlässen inhaltlich begleiten zu dürfen. Der Film heisst schlicht «Zwingli». Aber ganz klar: Es geht nicht nur um seine Person und seine Ideen, sondern auch um die Menschen, die um ihn waren und die Bewegung mitgetragen, mitbefördert, die mitgedacht, mitgelitten und mitgestritten haben. Wer, wenn nicht seine Ehefrau, die er geliebt und als Priester geheiratet hat, könnte da nicht ein Lied davon singen: Anna Reinhart.

Wir haben schon einige Veranstaltungen und Projekte rund um das Thema Frauen im Rahmen des Reformationsjubiläums gestalten und damit eine Bewusstseinsschärfung fördern dürfen. In der vierten Ausgabe der Veranstaltungsreihe «Update Reformationsjubiläum» sprechen wir für einmal anders über die Frage von Rollen: Reformationsbotschafterin und Pfarrerin Catherine McMillan unterhält sich mit der Schauspielerin Sarah Sophia Meyer, die im Film Anna Reinhart verkörpert und am Schauspielhaus Graz tätig ist. Was sind ihre ganz persönlichen Gedanken, Erfahrungen, was hat der Film und die Auseinandersetzung mit der Geschichte, den Personen, der Frau und Rolle Anna sowie dem Gedankengut der Umwälzungen von vor 500 Jahren mit ihr gemacht und welche Botschaft möchte sie vermitteln? Freuen Sie sich mit uns auf einen anregenden Abend mit anschliessender Diskussion und Apéro.

Written by Jim

4 Oct 2018 at 8:06 am

Posted in media

Zwingli Defeated Luther at Marburg

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When Zwingli propounded his view of the Lord’s Supper at Marburg he defeated Luther’s.  How?  Because more Protestant / Reformed Christians now hold Zwingli’s view than Luther’s.

Remember- Baptists outnumber Lutherans in America by huge margins and Baptists are Zwinglians in eucharistic theology.

Poor Luther – a sad loser to this very day.

Written by Jim

3 Oct 2018 at 5:53 am

Posted in Modern Culture

Fun Facts From Church History: The Landgrave and the Sermon on Providence Preached by Zwingli at Marburg

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The Landgrave requested Zwingli, on January 25, 1530, to write out for him the sermon upon Providence which he had preached at Marburg, and Zwingli complied.*

Indeed he did, in a greatly expanded version which ran to book length.  Zwingli’s Sermon on Providence would appear in August of that same year.  Its full title- Ad illustrissimum Cattorum principem Philippum sermonis de providentia dei anamnema.

The dedication, rather lengthy, follows:

Illustrissimo principi Cattorum Philippo Huldrychus Zuinglius gratiam et pacem a domino et servatore nostro Christo Jesu.

Flagitas, quod iustius postulares aut repeteres, piissime princeps, sermonem, quem in aula tua Marcburgi habui. Cuius equidem praestandi tam promptus essem quam tu petendi, si voluntatem audiret memoria. Cur enim celsitudini tuae non ultro serviant omnium, qui nostram religionem aut dicendo aut docendo colunt, ingenia? Qum unus candide hoc agas, ut religionis crepundia et sancte alantur et tranquille adolescant. Unus recte expendisti unum nisi solum deum neminem recte nosse omnia; ad unius ergo sententiam hominis imprudenter constitui omnia. Unus, cum vides, quid apud religionis Christianae liturgos aemulatio et simultas, imo ut candide ac adperte omnia dicam: quid error et gloriae cupido possint, anxie caves, ne asseclarum grex ille, vitiorum etiam magistri aemulus, studio suo in dissidium aut tumultum aliquem erumpat.

Unus intelligis, si religionis summam probe teneamus, iam caeterarum opinionum diversitatem non tanti esse, ut earum causa funem charitatis [vgl. Hos 11, 4; Eph 4, 3], quo, velut Atheniensium contio miniata chorda, in unum spiritum ac mentem coimus, perfringamus. Unus, etiam cum πληροφορηθεὶς ac certus es de re, quam alii adhuc paulo incivilius et indoctius controvertunt, sancta quadam hypocrisi fluctuare te atque ambigere simulas, ut velut errantium socius, cum amicitia et comitate tum nominis tui praesidio atque securitatis spe, et ab errore avellas, qum te videant impigre veritatem, ut illuxerit, amplecti, et metu liberes, qum te velut portum prospiciant, ad quem adpellent, si quid pro mutata sententia periculi immineat. Hoc tandem est εἰρηνοποιεῖσθαι, hoc est: Christianae tranquillitatis artes pure et probe nosse, hoc est: pium principem praestare.

Adde, quo non iam doctis, sed universis simul tum populis tum principibus te suspiciendum et imitandum praebes, quod unus tanta moderatione ac benignitate tuos regis, ut solus videaris reliquos huc manuducere, ut discant pars imperare volentibus, pars parere aequis imperiis. Quae tua virtus, inquam, fides ac prudentia, quamvis iuvenis adhuc, efficiunt, ut, qui te non exosculantur, aut splendoris tui iubar nondum viderint, aut viso maligne invideant. Contra quorum vota, si pergas manere, quod esse coepisti, in eum modum crescere te faciet, qui incrementum dat, deus [nach 1 Kor 3, 7], ut et praesentibus et posteris nobile pietatis ac constantiae exemplum fias. Sed nunc ad me redeo: si, inquam, memoria reddere cuncta, quae tunc a nobis dicta sunt, et verbis et ordine posset, iam nihil optatius contingeret quam occasio ista morem tibi gerendi. Qum vero tam tenax ac fida memoria, qua forte Portius aliquis aut Seneca omnia resumeret, nobis negata sit, hunc in modum agam.

De providentia brevem, sed solidam, arbitror, summam in capita non plura septem digeram. Quae ubi perspexeris, credo si non sermonem ipsum, attamen argumentum idem ac materiam te accepisse fateberis, omnia rudi ac simplici Minerva. Tu, fortissime heros, interim rerum divinarum scientiam, interim innocentiam sic colas, ut omnes Cattorum principem catum sicut serpentem et simplicem sicut columbam esse, iuxta salvatoris Christi sententiam [vgl. Mt 10, 16], gaudeamus.

Is te servet reipublicae suae diu incolumem.

Amen. Tiguri, anno 1530.

zwingli_signature

It’s a remarkable work though more philosophical in tone than most of Zwingli’s works.  It is available, for free, in English, on Google Play from Google books.  Get it here.

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*S. Jackson, Huldreich Zwingli: The Reformer of German Switzerland (1484–1531) (p. 334).

Written by Jim

2 Oct 2018 at 2:34 pm

Posted in Church History, Zwingli

Zwingli’s Opening Prayer at Marburg

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marburg2This deserves to be repeated- and adopted by all of us whenever we engage in theological debate:

“Fill us, O Lord and Father of us all, we beseech Thee, with thy gentle Spirit, and dispel on both sides all the clouds of misunderstanding and passion. Make an end to the strife of blind fury. Arise, O Christ, Thou Sun of righteousness, and shine upon us. Alas! while we contend, we only too often forget to strive after holiness which Thou requirest from us all. Guard us against abusing our powers, and enable us to employ them with all earnestness for the promotion of holiness.”

Written by Jim

2 Oct 2018 at 5:40 am

Posted in Zwingli

Zwingli – Eine Anleitung zur Reformation

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Du willst deine eigene Reformation anzetteln? Dann begib dich auf eine Zeitreise in die Jahre zwischen 1519 und 1531, als Huldrich Zwingli eine Stadt und ihre religiösen Glaubensvorstellungen durch seine kritischen und innovativen Ideen nachhaltig verändert hat. Hör dir die fünf Protestbotschaften an, die Zwingli persönlich an dich richtet und erlebe die Transformation dieser Gedanken in die heutige Zeit. Auf der Tour begegnest du dem ehemaligen Bundesrat Moritz Leuenberger, der Prorektorin der Universität Zürich Gabriele Siegert, der Poetry Slamerin Olga Lakritz und anderen spannenden Persönlichkeiten. Die Zeit ist reif: Tauche ein, reformiere dich und dein Zürich. 

And more.

Written by Jim

29 Sep 2018 at 8:44 am

Posted in Modern Culture

On the Cusp of the Marburg Colloquy: Zwingli Arrives

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Samuel Simpson writes

The journey to Basel was made on horseback, the distance from Zurich being about sixty miles, and Zwingli and his friend arrived there safely, September 5. Thence, in company with Œcolampadius and others, he proceeded by boat to Strasburg, where he arrived the next day, September 6. Here he tarried eleven days to confer with his friends and lay plans for the coming conference and also to await the arrival of Ulrich Funk, Zurich’s official delegate. Leaving Strasburg September 18, the company, consisting of Zwingli, Collin, and Funk, of Zurich; Œcolampadius, of Basel; Butzer and Hedio, of Strasburg; and delegates of the last named cities, was conducted overland by a strong escort of Hessian cavalry, through dense forests and dangerous mountain passes, to Marburg, where they arrived September 27. Luther, in company with his Wittenberg friends, Philip Melanchthon, Caspar Cruciger, and Justus Jonas, entered the city the day following.

Here’s a map showing Zwingli’s route from Zurich to Marburg:

route marburg

Written by Jim

27 Sep 2018 at 5:10 am