On the Freedom of the Will

“There is great diversity among ecclesiastical writers, some affirming, others denying the freedom of the will. Even the same writer, in different places, seems oftentimes to express opposite sentiments on this subject, sometimes affirming and sometimes denying it. This diversity cannot be more readily settled than by a grammatical explanation of the word. For, if the term free will be used in the most common acceptation, it signifies nothing more than, that the man who possesses it is rational, or has mind and choice; that besides natural emotions and actions, concerning which there is no deliberation of mind or choice of will, a man has voluntary emotions, to the exercise of which the judgment of the mind and the inclination of the will concur; and that in virtues and vices, in order that actions may be called either good or bad, an intelligent mind is required and a will which either yields to or resists the judgment.”  — Martin Chemnitz

That clears it right up, right?  Ah the Orthodox Lutherans…  what a blessing to the theological enterprise…