Two Things

Herman Selderhuis was at my session (along with Peter Opitz and Joe Mock and WP Stepens and, miraculously, no one jumped out the window!  Herman took a couple of pictures- so here’s one:

So The discussion afterwards was very good!

The second thing- tomorrow I have an entirely free day since I don’t return home till Sunday so I am going to take the train to Wildhaus and spend the day there.

I’ll surely have some photos to post.  More anon. For now, I’m going to sleep.

A Septuagint Snippet on International Septuagint Day

1 1 Και ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ κρίνειν τοὺς κριτὰς καὶ ἐγένετο λιμὸς ἐν τῇ γῇ·, καὶ ἐπορεύθη ἀνὴρ ἀπὸ Βαιθλέεμ τῆς Ἰούδα τοῦ παροικῆσαι ἐν ἀγρῷ Μωάβ, αὐτὸς καὶ ἡ γυνὴ αὐτοῦ καὶ οἱ υἱοὶ αὐτοῦ. 2 καὶ ὄνομα τῷ ἀνδρὶ Ἀβιμέλεχ, καὶ ὄνομα τοῖς δυσὶν υἱοῖς αὐτοῦ Μααλὼν καὶ Χελαιών, Ἐφραθαῖοι ἐκ Βαιθλέεμ τῆς Ἰούδα· καὶ ἤλθοσαν εἰς ἀγρὸν Μωὰβ καὶ ἦσαν ἐκεῖ. 3 καὶ ἀπέθανεν Ἀβιμέλεχ ὁ ἀνὴρ τῆς Νωεμίν, καὶ κατελείφθη αὐτὴ καὶ οἱ δύο υἱοὶ αὐτῆς. 4 καὶ ἐλάβοσαν ἑαυτοῖς γυναῖκας Μωαβίτιδας, ὄνομα τῇ μιᾷ Ὀρφά, καὶ ὄνομα τῇ δευτέρᾳ Ῥούθ· καὶ κατῴκησαν ἐκεῖ ὡς δέκα ἔτη. 5 καὶ ἀπέθανον καί γε ἀμφότεροι Μααλὼν καὶ Χελαιών, καὶ κατελείφθη ἡ γυνὴ ἀπὸ τοῦ ἀνδρὸς αὐτῆς καὶ ἀπὸ τῶν δύο υἱῶν αὐτῆς. 1 1 Και ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ κρίνειν τοὺς κριτὰς καὶ ἐγένετο λιμὸς ἐν τῇ γῇ·, καὶ ἐπορεύθη ἀνὴρ ἀπὸ Βαιθλέεμ τῆς Ἰούδα τοῦ παροικῆσαι ἐν ἀγρῷ Μωάβ, αὐτὸς καὶ ἡ γυνὴ αὐτοῦ καὶ οἱ υἱοὶ αὐτοῦ. 2 καὶ ὄνομα τῷ ἀνδρὶ Ἀβιμέλεχ, καὶ ὄνομα τοῖς δυσὶν υἱοῖς αὐτοῦ Μααλὼν καὶ Χελαιών, Ἐφραθαῖοι ἐκ Βαιθλέεμ τῆς Ἰούδα· καὶ ἤλθοσαν εἰς ἀγρὸν Μωὰβ καὶ ἦσαν ἐκεῖ. 3 καὶ ἀπέθανεν Ἀβιμέλεχ ὁ ἀνὴρ τῆς Νωεμίν, καὶ κατελείφθη αὐτὴ καὶ οἱ δύο υἱοὶ αὐτῆς. 4 καὶ ἐλάβοσαν ἑαυτοῖς γυναῖκας Μωαβίτιδας, ὄνομα τῇ μιᾷ Ὀρφά, καὶ ὄνομα τῇ δευτέρᾳ Ῥούθ· καὶ κατῴκησαν ἐκεῖ ὡς δέκα ἔτη. 5 καὶ ἀπέθανον καί γε ἀμφότεροι Μααλὼν καὶ Χελαιών, καὶ κατελείφθη ἡ γυνὴ ἀπὸ τοῦ ἀνδρὸς αὐτῆς καὶ ἀπὸ τῶν δύο υἱῶν αὐτῆς.*

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*Quast, U. (Ed.). (2006). Ruth (Vol. IV, 3, Ru 1). Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht.

Interview with Dr James K. Aitken

A great interview with the best LXX guy on the planet (and a super nice dude).

Interaction of Traditions

To mark the International Septuagint Day (8 February) we have an interview with Dr James Aitken, an expert in the field. We ask him questions about language research, ancient Greek, and the study of the Septuagint within biblical studies.

james-aitkenJames Aitken is Reader in Hebrew and Early Jewish Studies at the Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge. Publications include No Stone Unturned:Greek Inscriptions and Septuagint Vocabulary (Eisenbrauns, 2014) and the T&T ClarkCompanion to the Septuagint (T&T Clark, 2015).

  • Which challenges arise in studying religious canonical texts from both a lexicographical and theological point of view [including linguistic dating of such texts]?

Challenges are always before us from the simple lack in our own knowledge about the ancient world coupled with the sparsity of evidence. The world around the Bible has to be reconstructed from a range of sources, often contradictory and certainly incomplete. While the texts are canonical…

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International Septuagint Day: February 8

A few years ago Jim Aitken wrote

February 8th is “International Septuagint Day.” Bloggers will be reminding us why it is important to study the LXX, including its text-critical value, its witness to early biblical exegesis, and its place as the first Bible of the Church. Let me offer some other rarely cited reasons:

• It is the largest extant piece of Ptolemaic Greek.
• It is one of the major works of Egyptian Greek literature.
• It is one of the first works of Hellenistic Judaism, though mostly ignored in books on the subject.
• It is (possibly) the largest work of translation literature from antiquity, offering valuable insight for translation studies on both bilingual interference and translation technique.
• It is a work of sub-literary Greek that demonstrates the complexities of Greek register.
• It is a major lexical resource for lesser-known koine words. (not only illustrated by papyri, but illuminating for papyri).
• It testifies to a distinct Jewish-Greek (even Egyptian?) identity.
• It tells us much about educational levels in Egypt and among Jews.

(To understand its theology, we must place it in its context first).

http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/ioscs/feb8/

I’ll be taking part again and providing citations from the highly esteemed Göttingen Septuagint.