The Exploration of Sela

Here’s an interesting archaeological news report:

Overseeing the Edom Plateau, south of Jordan, between Tafila and Busayra, stands the Edomite-Nabataean mountain stronghold, Sela, a fortress carved into the mountain, dating back more than 3,000 years.

A carved inscription and relief (engraved representation) of the Neo-Babylonian King Nabonidu (556-539BC), uncovered in Sela, stand witness to the importance of the age-old fortress during the period of Mesopotamian expansion into the area of Transjordan, said  Jordanian scholar Mohammad Najjar.

Sela was strategic to any military movement into the southern parts of Transjordan, as it guarded the settlements and agrarian land plots in its vicinity and stood as a watchtower over the entire south-western regions.

Greek historian Strabo (64BC-24AD) described it as “the metropolis of the Nabataean… fortified all around by rock, the outside part of the site being precipitous and sheer, and the inside parts having springs in abundance, both for domestic use and watering gardens”.

Etc.  Enjoy!