Happy Reformation Day!

Or as I like to call it- Second Reformation Day Initiated by the Third Reformer, Luther, Who Wasn’t the First Reformer (That Was Zwingli, Already in 1515) or the Brightest Reformer (That Was Calvin).  But that’s an awfully long title and it hasn’t really caught on.  Though in order to be historically accurate, it should.

At any rate- Happy Day to all those children of the Reformers!

zwingli453

Jean_Calvin

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10 thoughts on “Happy Reformation Day!

  1. Truth2Freedom 31 Oct 2014 at 3:34 am

    Reblogged this on Truth2Freedom's Blog.

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  2. gospelcentral 31 Oct 2014 at 8:59 am

    Hey Jim,

    What happened in 1515 with Zwingli which constitutes a reformation?

    Marty.

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    • Jim 31 Oct 2014 at 10:26 am

      his deepened study of the new testament in greek led him to reevaluate everything happening in the church of rome and he began to change things, bit by bit, in glarus.

      i would ask you, what about luther’s act of nailing debate theses, in latin, to the church door constituted a reformation?

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  3. Martin Foord 31 Oct 2014 at 11:16 am

    Hey Jim,

    I’m not questioning your thesis at all, I’m fascinated to hear what you think. I guess I’m asking, why 1515 and not 1516? Didn’t Zwingli first read the Greek NT in 1516 when it was published? Are you saying that Zwingli was developing a spirit of reform prior to reading the Greek NT in 1515?

    Cheers,

    Marty.

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    • Jim 31 Oct 2014 at 11:31 am

      he actually came to the realization that the church needed to be reformed and corrected in 1515 when, at the battle of marignano, he saw swiss boys slaughtered for the pope. it changed him. as war changes everyone.

      there were bits and pieces of the greek new testament before erasmus of course, and he had access to them at glarus and previously in vienna and basel. erasmus’ edition was the first printed, not the first.

      so these events in combination, plus many others, moved him in a reforming direction before anyone had ever heard of luther outside of wittenberg.

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  4. Martin Foord 31 Oct 2014 at 12:10 pm

    Hey Jim, thanks this is brilliant. Can you recommend any further reading on this? I’d love to find out more.

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    • Jim 31 Oct 2014 at 12:17 pm

      do you read german perchance?

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  5. Martin Foord 1 Nov 2014 at 10:36 am

    I read German, but very slowly (alas). I’d be interested in any German but especially English reading material on this for sure.

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    • Jim 1 Nov 2014 at 3:48 pm

      the best place to start is potter’s biography then. and then, for the most detail, the 4 volume biography of farner.

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