The May Biblioblog Carnival from Avignon

It’s 1 June and that means it’s hot out and that means it’s time for you to enjoy cool biblical studies blogging at its best.  And that means that it’s time to review the best posts of the preceding month.  And that means the best posts in biblical studies which appeared in May.  Here they are.  Sit back.  Have a cold one (and by that I mean root beer). Enjoy!

Hebrew Bible / Old Testament

A conference in Jerusalem revealed a series of texts recently deciphered from the Qumran caves, including one that seems to indicate the existence of a heretofore unknown manuscript.  It was biblioblogged here.  James McGrath went on something of a rampage against the young earth creationist people, posting several entries on May 2 on the topic- this being one of them.  I don’t think he’s a fan of the YEC.

Down Under they’re pitching an energy drink as a replacement for God and they’re using David to do it.  Thanks, Deane….

Interested in the Ark of the Covenant?  Then you need to watch this lecture by Thomas Römer.  It’s very learned.

Animals.

And watch this lecture about the Phoenecians…  because apparently they never existed… like New Zealanders and Hobbits…

Andy Stanley (a mega-church pastor who is by that very fact clearly no theologian or biblical scholar) blathered in May about Christians ‘unhitching’ from aspects of the Old Testament (the feckless heretic).  And he’s called on the carpet for it by the very wise Carmen Imes.  And unlike Stanley and all of his tragically ignorant defenders, Imes actually is a scholar.

If you’re in the mood for absolute lunacy, check out the craziness of the Answers in Genesis crowd…  as it tries to prove that Solomon was a monogamous soul.  Good heavens.

The editors of the forthcoming ‘LXX Readers Edition’ discuss their choice of the base text here.  They made the only sensible decision.

New Testament

The Jesus Blog people talked about a conference on social scientific criticism (etc) over on their semi-cool blog.  The conference has already taken place as this carnival posts but I’m sure that Chris Keith and the other participants will be happy to tell you all about th …..  zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz……….

Don’t skip John Barclay’s Firth Lecture.  It’s about Paul.  And Gifts.  Speaking of gifts, my birthday is coming up…  And remember, it’s more blessed to give to Jim (vl) than it is to receive.

George Athas wants to tell you about the parable of the talents.  You know who has talent?  Not Joel Watts.

A movie review showed up this month- about textual criticism.  Go figure.  Speaking of TC, here’s another interesting TC bitlet on Ephesians.  And yet more TC joy is over here, on Codex Marchalianus.

#Papyrusgate. Yup.  Because silly claims were made about a fragment of Mark supposedly dating to the first century but which, surprise surprise, doesn’t.  And, just in case you needed something to live in hope for, Larry Hurtado points out that ‘billions and billions’ (in the voice of that annoying science guy who’s dead) of fragments are yet to be studied.  So who knows, maybe among the rubbish there’s something that isn’t.  And then this happened.  And then this.  How long, O Lord…

Deane Galbraith tweeted “There will be a debate on whether Luke used Matthew (Mark Goodacre) or Matthew used Luke (Alan Garrow) at , in September. Just when you thought the Synoptic Problem couldn’t get any MORE exciting!!”   ZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz………..

John Barclay gave an excellent talk on anthropology, theology and history at the University of Zurich that, if you missed, you can watch here.

Larry Hurtado talks some about anonymous Gospels.  (Pro-tip- all the gospels are anonymous).

Richard Goode is teaching Greek this Summer at Newman.  You’ll want to attend if you’re anywhere around Birmingham.  And while there, you’ll want to throw things at Richard and mock him mightily and mercilessly.  He expects it.  No, really, he wants you to throw things at him…

Rick Brannan offers some thoughts on what early Christians read.  Pro-tip:  none of them read anything by NT Wright (and if they had they would have called a Council to denounce and excommunicate him, amen).

Tim B. has a few things to say about 1Peter and the submission of wives… I guess he likes hate mail.

Archaeology

Herein the Museum of the Bible is gutted and the entrails hung up for a public display.  And Roberta Mazza gets quoted.

Dead Sea Scrolls stuff! Enjoy!  And more Dead Sea Scrolls stuff.  But you missed it.  If Michael is in your town in the future, you owe it to yourself to visit him.  Speaking of Dead Sea stuff, be sure to visit Matthieu Richelle’s new Paleo-Hebrew site.

Be sure to read Larry Schiffman’s ‘Jewish Connection to Jerusalem‘.  It’s archaeology-esque.

Books

This one you just have to see to believe.  I’ll just say – what do you get when you cross a graphic novel with Old Testament scholar Thomas Römer?

There’s something called the ‘Companion to the Bible and Film’ by T&T Clark- and there’s an interview about it.  So you should read it.  I think that if you take your bible to a film (not only are you a bit weird, but) you’re not going to be able to read it because it’s dark in the theater.  But maybe the book comes with tiny non invasive reading lights…

Phil Long reviewed a book about Messiah and Passover.  “Glaser began this book with an argument in favor of Christians celebrating Passover, or at least incorporating elements of Passover into their Christian worship.”   Nope.  Nope.  Nope.

The folk at New College mentioned a few online resources for biblical studies that will be on interest to many.  We have four new digital resource trials for Biblical Studies this month. They’re all accessible from the E-resource trials web page.  Take a look.  

And- run over right off and pick up the ‘Free Book of the Month’ from Logos.

Miscellaneous

Interestingly, the SBL archives have been moved down to Atlanta.  Hmmm…  Makes sense really since the SBL headquarters are not but a few miles from Emory (where the Pitts library is).

Bill Ross is talking about the LXX Reader’s Edition at something called the Evangelical Theology Society.  I guess it’s Trump supporters who study theology (but for the life of me I can’t imagine anyone in that crowd being smart enough to study theology).  At any rate, Bill’s session should be good…  One hopes… I guess.

Visit the new website of the Oxford University, Oriel College, Centre for the Study of the Bible.  Sure, they spelled ‘center’ wrong… but otherwise it’s fantastic.

J. Crossley has an essay about the Bible and English politics that I’m sure must be good but it’s behind a pay wall.  But hey, for $43 I could buy access to it for 24 hours or I could snatch up the whole issue in which it appears for a paltry $123.  Which to choose…. which. To. Choose….   And speaking of JC- he’s sure to be at the BCTR(S) meeting in London.  So you should go if you can.  It will cost you less than renting an essay for a day….

The DMG has digitized its various journals.  Chuck Jones has the details and you’ll definitely want to rummage through some of those issues.

James Crossley has added another task to his impressive list of tasks.  And congrats to him for it.

Jim Spinti has some interesting things to say about translations.  Worth a read.

Tim B. is hosting the ‘Roman’ (i.e., ‘official’) Carnival over at his place.  And, dear friends, enjoy your Summer…

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