Daily Archives: 1 Apr 2018

Quote of the Day

Those who are a prey to obstinate hypocrisy can never be persuaded by the most skillful argument to confess what they really feel and have in their hearts. Yet the more persistently they refuse, the more certainly are they understood by the spiritual physician. For “he that is spiritual judgeth all things” — Huldrych Zwingli

Zwingli’s Warning Against Folly

An appropriate warning for folly day-

Zwingli optWhere persons assemble in social gatherings, every youth attending them should see to it that he go away morally benefited; so that he may not, as Socrates complains, always come home morally worse than he was before. He should therefore be watchful and diligent to follow the example of those who conduct themselves honorably and uprightly on social occasions; but, on the other hand, when he observes persons behaving themselves unbecomingly or shamefully, let him beware of imitating them.

Those, however, who are grown up and have become bold and fixed in their habits are hardly able to restrain themselves in this manner; therefore my advice is, that the youth should attend public gatherings, for social purposes, all the more rarely. Should a youth perchance be led into the folly of others, he ought by all means to turn away from it and should come to himself at the earliest moment. His reason for thus withdrawing from such association will satisfy those persons who know that his desire is, always to be intent on doing what is noblest and best.

Death

A Blog Announcement

I’m happy to announce the super news that Joel Watts, Chris Tilling, Richard Bauckham, James Dunn, Mike Bird, NT Wright, NT Wrong, James Crossley, David Lincicum, and myself will be entering an agreement to participate together in a group blog!

The URL will be announced in a few short weeks and as soon as it is word will be passed along.  The blog will be titled ‘Explorations in Lexicography, Antiquity, and Xenophobia’ (ExLax).  We are SUPER excited about this project and hope that it leads to many, many fruitful (and sometimes nutty and sometimes corny but always odiferous) expulsions of helpfulness.

Beneath, our gallery of contributors.  Stay tuned in!

Sometimes You Have to Be Willing to Lose Church Members…

Rather than accept false doctrine.  Luther makes this clear when he writes, in reference to some of the opinions of Erasmus and how their rejection may be offensive to some:

Many wise people in the church may be offended, yet it’s better that we lose them than deny Christ, the Savior.

Indeed. You have to be willing to lose members rather than forsake truth.  This is something the seeker sensitives and the emergents could never do.

The ‘Church Growth’ Movement Is Heresy

‘Go into all the world and make disciples’. – Jesus

The Church is better served by 2 disciples than it is by 200 ‘church members’. And so is the world.

That’s why Jesus told us to make disciples, not ‘grow churches’.

Happy Easter!

Jerry Falwell Jr Would Probably Support Trump Even if He Raped Someone! Falwell is no Christian

Falwell said he would have to consider the circumstances of the rape himself….

This man is not a Christian.  No Christian thinks rape is EVER acceptable and no Christian ever says that he could support a rapist under any circumstances whatsoever.

Jerry Falwell Jr is a disgrace and he needs to be removed from his position at Liberty or that University will forever be associated with the worst and most unchristian mindset.

The March Madness Edition of the Biblical Studies Carnival

Our 145th Biblical Studies Carnival launches with posts focusing on the Old Testament /Hebrew Bible.   The title of the Carnival, though, has nothing to do with the contents except that the Carnival will be a slam dunk of biblioblogging gloriousness and tiny underdogs will find their rightful exposure to the wider world.  It will be nothing like picking up a book Chris Tilling has written that has Paul on the title page but it turns out it’s really about chess or something equally terrible.  So let’s get to it, shall we?

Old Testament / Hebrew Bible

Let’s start off our madness with an important reminder from James ‘The Bookman’ Spinti- that translations of translations are not the best starting point…  After making the point Spinti observes

Think Augustine, who knew no Hebrew and a smattering of Greek. He was dependent on the Old Latin translations—which frequently were less accurate than Jerome’s Vulgate, which was in the process of being completed while Augustine was alive. Jerome knew Hebrew well and not infrequently chided Augustine about his lack of knowledge of Greek and Hebrew (Jerome could be nasty…).

Could he be?  I never noticed…

Deane has a really interesting post on the origin of a marble statue representing Gen 6:1-4 and its connection to Old Faithful.  Really.  History is weird.

Eibert Tigchelaar’s lecture Beautiful Bookhands and Careless Characters has been posted online by the University of BirminghamSo say the folk at OTTC.

Jim Davila brings our attention to the John William Wevers LXX prize 2018 and your chance to nominate someone.  I nominate William Ross.  John Meade discusses the LXX canon… and let me say- NO, John, NO!   Mark Leuchter has a new article in the Journal of Hebrew Scripture, as announced here.  James McGrath has some things to say about something called ‘Young Earth Creationism‘.  Must be some sort of hipster band.  Hipsters are so weird, with their home brewed booze and their straggly rat infested greasy beards and nasty sweat encrusted caps… gross smelly beasts.

IOSOT is coming to Aberdeen in August of 2019 and they’ve already set up the website.  I love planners.  I may plan on going and skip SBL next year.

For 40 years the Hebrew Bible and digital technology have been intertwined.  And there’s a neat discussion / exhibition here.

If you want to have some fun read Matt’s post on Samson and Delilah.  It’s a 1922 film and it looks as terrible as you would think.  Some guy wanted to discuss some recent approaches to the book of Qoheleth.  Go ahead and read it, but it’s all vain.

Michael Homan has a great essay on the Mosaic Tabernacle in its ANE context.  It includes super illustrations.  Be sure not to miss it.  And if you’re in the UK you might be interested in this call for applications for Hebrew Manuscript Studies: Codicology, Palaeography, Art History.

Ryan Thomas needs your help deciphering a bit of Aramaic from Elephantine.  At the moment I’m posting this, the photo he provides is not working.  Hopefully it will be when the Carnival goes live.

Brant Petree has an interesting take on the bronze serpent.  From Numbers.  You know, the bronze serpent that healed all the rebellious Israelites after tens of thousands died thanks to their whinings… that bronze one.

Michael Heiser wrote a bit about the ‘Book of Og’.  It’s not the same as the terrible book by Chris Tilling called ‘The Book of Ugh’.  So please don’t confuse the two.

New Testament /Early Christianity

You may have missed it but Ben Witherington had a brief anecdote about the great C.K. Barrett, who had an amusing observation to make once about New Testament scholars.  And you may have missed the contents of the latest issue of New Testament Studies, but don’t worry, Danny Zacharias has your back.  I guess.  I think that’s what the kids say.  Who knows.  I don’t really care what the kids say anyway….

How did Jesus Become God?  The NOB debate. Professor Bart Ehrman and Dr Michael Bird debated the content of and issues surrounding Ehrman’s recent book, How Jesus Became God: The Exaltation of a Preacher from Galilee.  It’s a series of videos.  #ICYMI (and you probably did miss it).

George *The Kiwi Starbucks Lover* Athas has a nifty post on the reason for Jesus’ execution (just in time for Easter).

Hugh Houghton does us all a favor here when he discusses the resurrection accounts in the Gospels, in Codex Sinaiticus!

Michael Langlois has some Jesus stuff on his blog about a Jesus film in the French tongue:  Jésus, l’enquête.  And who doesn’t want to investigate Jesus?  I mean besides the cray-cray ‘Jesus mythicists’ (who for people who claim they don’t believe Jesus existed sure do spend a lot of time talking about him….)

They’re going to have a study session in Cambridge at Tyndale House this July on the Gospel of John.  Pepsico has the details.  Roosters and the like make an appearance in the Tyndale House, Cambridge NT Blog.  Cock-a-doodle-doooooo….. They also discuss a variant in Luke 22:31  and one in Luke 23.  And Brian Davidson talked about the Tyndale GNT over at his place.  Meanwhile, the Logos folk asked ‘which text did Jesus use?‘  I’ll go ahead and answer: He used the Hebrew text.  He was, after all, a Palestinian Rabbi.

Joan Taylor and Helen Bond went to see the Mary Magdalene film and discussed it on the YouTube.  Others saw it too and were not at all that impressed with it.  And, back to Joan and Helen, they’re featured on a BBC 4 documentary on the women disciples of Jesus airing April 8 at 8 PM.  I sure wish it was airing here.

Mary also comes up for discussion by Michael Pahl.  I think Mary is pretty uninteresting as a New Testament character.  Far more interesting is the famed ‘Whore of Babylon’ in the book of Revelation.  She fascinates (as symbol).  But hey, to each her own, as the kids say (when they can bother to stop snapfacing and instagramming)…

Phil-Bob Long reviewed a commentary by F.F. Bruce.  Sort of surprised to see Bruce writing a newly published volume, what with him being all dead and all.  But stranger things have happened. And Tommy Wasserman is giving away a copy of his recent book on textual criticism.  Enter at your own risk.  Speaking of Textual Criticism, take a look at Ben Witherington’s post on p75.  The page is Patheos so beware of the plethora of ads you’ll have to slash through to get to the post.

Larry Hurtado didn’t like Mary Magdalene the film very much.  He would nearly rather watch paint dry.

Chris Keith will be talking about Jesus and cannibals (I think) in May- so you should arrange to go hear him.

Stephen Carlson wrote a bit about a forged manuscript.  Interesting if you’re into fakes.  And not fake, a multi-part examination of a new commentary on 2 Peter by Canadian Michael Kok you’ll want to check out here and here (so far).

Christoph Helig had a great post on learning Koine.  Go read it now, and then come back.  And if you want to learn Greek, do it at Newman University this Summer.

There’s a neat debunking of the myths about women and their place in the early Church over at the Oxford U. blog.  Give it a read.  And there’s also a neat post debunking NT Wright (alright maybe not debunking but perhaps showing his work to be bunk) by some kid with a Yosemite Sam mustache.  Come on, guys, shave so you don’t look like you’re hiding food in your face.

Henry Neufeld offered a reading of Hebrews 6:4-6 which isn’t altogether horrible or completely wrong.  Give it a read.  And Brian Fulthorpe discussed 1 Tim 2:11-15.  I’m not sure why, but as you know I’m not here to judge, I’m just a simple collector, like a Gospel redactor stringing pearls together on a string.  It’s up to you, precious soul, to decide what you like or don’t.

Archaeology /Scrolls

Roberta Mazza has an interesting piece on the illegal sale of papyri and what YOU can do about it.  You ought to read it if you haven’t already.  Beth She’arim is the subject of this post by the learned Jim Davila.

Todd Bolen discusses a newly discovered undisturbed Canaanite tomb.  Clearly, this proves that it isn’t Israel which has legitimate claim to the land, but the Canaanites (borrowing from the playbook of the Zionists who, whenever there is a ‘discovery’ of an Israelite this or that, use it to justify Jewish control of the land as though ancient Israel = modern Israel).

Archaeologists made some false claims about the City of David and now those false claims have been exposed by science.  Archaeologists need to abandon the Bible and spade approach.  They’re only hurting their own discipline.  And speaking of false claims, the false claim by Mazar concerning the so called ‘Isaiah Seal’ is the subject of a podcast by Chris Rollston.  And in yet another black eye for the discipline, Mellaart has been found to have forged many of his own ‘discoveries’.  Despicable.  Get your act together, archaeology.

Speaking of the unbelievable, they’ve done a Festschrift for Hershel Shanks….  Jesus take the wheel.

The Megiddo Mosaic gets a look from Arne Berge.  Who doesn’t love Megiddo and mosaics?

There was a neat post on International Women’s Day about women in archaeology that is very much worth a look.

Todd Bolen also had an interesting post about the large mikveh in Macherus which has been, for whatever reason, filled in.

James McGrath discusses Star Wars (?  is that the one with Kirk or Picard?) and archaeology.  What ties them together?  They’re both pretend (Star Wars all the time and archaeology whenever it hits the popular press).

Books and Other Media

Be sure to hop over to Logos and grab the free book of the month.  Very happy news from the Catholics: the Revised New Jerusalem Bible (New Testament) is out.  Next to the Revised English Bible, the Jerusalem Bible and the NJB are the best English translations.  So I’m going to have to obtain a copy of the RNJB when the whole thing is done in 2019. Speaking of Bible editions, happy news for the NT geeks- a new edition of the UBS/ NA text is coming in 2021/22.  And there’s also a new edition of the CSB coming.

There’s notice around and about concerning a new ‘Paul and Patristics’ database.  This is the first blog which I saw mention it (though twitter had noticed it a day before), so he gets the link.  Miraculously, this chap is blogging the RBL reviews when they appear.  RBL provides a good service so take a look if you’re one of the few who don’t already get the email from them.

Normally I wouldn’t mention a publisher’s sale but Wipf and Stock has stuff 50% off (on this list) till April 3.  So look it over and if you’re so inclined, get a bargain.  As they remark- Use code INV50 during checkout.

Better than 50% off, though, is free.  And you can download Huehnergard’s 3rd edition of his Akkadian Grammar for that low price.  That blog has all the best info just when you need to know it.  That guy is super.  And he’s the most beloved biblioblogger of all time.

David Instone-Brewer gives a bit of a tutorial on using LSJ’s lexicon in the STEP Bible.  Give it a read.

The Complete Jewish Study Bible is discussed over here with the editor in chief of the project.  If you like the ‘study bible’ genre, give it a read.  But remember-  Scot McKnight has an engaging post on Bible translation tribalism.   You’ll have to hack through the Patheos popups to get to it but with a steady hand and a sharp blade you’ll make it in an hour or two.

Here’s some good news- Francis Watson has a new book out.  He’s the best.  And as an example of what is not the best, here’s this post.  After you read it you’ll be all like ‘what?’  (And I only include it because I want you to know, precious soul, that you can do better if you try just a little.  Don’t be that guy…).

Check out STECA! – STECA is an international network for doctoral students and early career researchers, run by a Steering Committee, and currently based at the University of Birmingham. Our aim is to create a virtual common room to support early career researchers wherever they are based.   Bookmark it.

Faithlife has made a film on Textual Criticism.  Whaaaaaattttt?  Give it a look if you dare.  And the TC blog has a new contributor.  You may want to see the return of Elijah.  He doesn’t look at all like I expected him to.

Don’t miss this interview with David Instone-Brewer on the STEP Bible.  The STEP Bible is the best free Bible software I’ve yet encountered and I recommend it to my students each semester.  If you are a regular reader here you’ve probably heard me recommend it before as well.

And finally for this category- a gem from Jim.

Miscellaneous

Should you be keen to keep up with biblioblogging day by day, check out the Biblioblog Reference Library.  It doesn’t get a lot of press these days but it’s the perfect spot to get a ‘snapshot’ of the last 24 hours of biblioblogging fun.

Under no circumstances ought you miss the interview of Michael Langlois’s  titled ‘Revelations on the Bible’ in Science and Life Magazine.

The 2019 Hawarden ‘Old Testament in the New’ is ramping up its planning, so save the date.

Larry Hurtado has some musings on PhD studies.  He’s retired, so he’s old.  And old people have perspective.  So give it a look.  Seth Ehorn muses on what makes a good scholar.

Timothy Lim reconsiders the canonical process.  I sure hope it turns out different this time.  The last canon had Mark in it and Mark is the worst thing since Joel Watts….

Don’t miss Tim’s post on Bible reading.  It includes a picture, so non-readers like Joel Watts and Chris Tilling and all the Wrightians and Bonhoefferians will still be able to enjoy it.

And lastly- here is a list of women bibliobloggers for your examination (because March is the Month of Women)-

Coming Up

For the next two months these folk will be hosting the carnival:

If you’re interested in signing up to host a future Biblical Studies Carnival contact Phil Long (email@plong42). They’re a ton of fun to do.  And he needs good folk like you to help out.

Oh, and Happy Easter!