Robert Jeffress is a Disgrace to the Christian Faith, To Baptists, and to America

People in his ‘Church’ need to get out– or they remain simply because they are of like mind with him.  I.e., racists.

A few members of President Trump’s evangelical advisory council — including its spokesman — on Friday defended the president after he made comments about immigrants from places including Africa and Central America.

In a statement to The Washington Post, spokesman Johnnie Moore questioned whether Trump had actually made the comments and accused Congress of holding up immigration reform. If Trump did make the comments, Moore said, they “were crass.” The reports about Trump’s remarks are “absolutely suspect and politicized,” Moore said. He called immigration “a legislative branch issue, not an executive branch issue” and said that the focus should be putting pressure on Congress.

Trump made the remarks Thursday during a meeting with lawmakers in the Oval Office in which they discussed protecting immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and African countries as part of a bipartisan deal on the status of undocumented young U.S. immigrants, The Washington Post reported.

Some of Trump’s evangelical advisers declined to comment on the president’s remarks, including Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr., and Bishop Harry Jackson, an African American pastor from Beltsville, Md. Others, who were involved in Trump’s presidential campaign, including author Eric Metaxas and evangelist Franklin Graham, did not respond to requests for comment. Moore said that some of the people he represents in his capacity as a PR agent, such as megachurch pastor Paula White and radio host James Dobson, would not be commenting on the matter.

Many of these advisers who were part of his campaign have stuck by the president during some of his most controversial moments, including when the Access Hollywood tapes that were published before the election.

Others in the advisory group — the only known regular pipeline of religious feedback to the White House — spoke in support of the president, saying that his language may not have been acceptable but that his views are.

Robert Jeffress, pastor of First Baptist Dallas, a prominent Southern Baptist church, said that while he would not have used the same language Trump did, he agrees with the president’s perspective.

“What a lot of people miss is, America is not a church where everyone should be welcomed regardless of race and background,” Jeffress said. “I’m glad Trump understands the difference between a church and country. I support his views 100 percent, even though as a pastor I can’t use that language.”

The United States, Jeffress said, has every right to restrict immigration according to whatever criteria it establishes, including race or other qualifications. “The country has the right to establish what would benefit our nation the most,” he said. “I don’t think there’s anything racist about it at all.”

Jeffress is condemned by Scripture itself:

“Then He will also say to those on the left hand,`Depart from Me, you cursed, into the everlasting fire prepared for the devil and his angels:  `for I was hungry and you gave Me no food; I was thirsty and you gave Me no drink; `I was a stranger and you did not take Me in, naked and you did not clothe Me, sick and in prison and you did not visit Me.’  “Then they also will answer Him, saying,`Lord, when did we see You hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not minister to You?’  “Then He will answer them, saying,`Assuredly, I say to you, inasmuch as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to Me.’  “And these will go away into everlasting punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.” (Matt. 25:41-46)