The Bee Stings ‘Game of Thrones’ (You Knew They Would)

I can’t vouch for the accuracy of this lampooning as I’ve never seen as much as 10 seconds of the series. But some of you have seen every moment, and you’re happy enough to skip Sunday Evening worship to do it:

Skipping All Nude Scenes, Christian Makes It Through Six Seasons Of ‘Game Of Thrones’ In 20 Minutes

After years of abstaining from the wildly popular Game of Thrones due to its graphic nature, local man Kyle Schneider decided Thursday that he would allow himself to watch the hit show on one condition: he would skip past any scenes containing nudity or sex. After making the pact with himself, Schneider caught up with the show by binge-watching the first six seasons, and true to his word, skipped all nude scenes, making it through all 60 episodes in just under 20 minutes.

“What a wild show,” the man told reporters after his viewing session. “Both minutes of season one that contained no nudity or sex were pretty crazy! So many plot twists.”

“I’m happy I ended up getting 20 total minutes of viewing time through the first six seasons. At first I thought it would be a lot less than that—hoo boy,” he added.

At publishing time, Schneider had decided that he would also fast-forward past all graphic violence in the series moving forward, effectively leaving himself with just the opening sequence and closing credits.

I’m With Grebel on this One

True believing Christians are sheep among wolves- Conrad Grebel.

Reformation figures like Michael Sattler, Conrad Grebel, and Felix Manz—the Swiss Brethren—read the Bible differently. They taught that the Christian faith should be kept separate from entanglement with civil authority in order to preserve its prophetic voice. They believed Jesus taught us to be peacemakers, to love our enemies, and to welcome the stranger, which contradicted the priorities of earthly governments. 

Etc.

Power, status and influence in Paul’s Corinth – Student dissertation (part 2)

Part Two-

Newman Research Centre for the Bible and its Reception

InPart 1of Newman graduand Isabella Wray‘s examination of Paul’s use of ‘slave’ and ‘freedman’ in 1 Corinthians 7:20-24 she described the geopolitical setting of Corinth and emphasised how the tumultuous events of the re-establishment of this Roman colony contributed to creating a climate in which social advancement was made possible even for those who would normally have been excluded by law from it – namely freed slaves (the apeleutheroi). This excerpt develops this theme by including an example of just such a freedman, Babbius Philinus.

As Isabella remarked during one tutorial, people like Babbius must have sprung into the minds of the Corinthian readers at his mention of ἀπελεύθερος (apeleutheros), in v.22…

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