Politicians Supporting Trump Are Already Being Voted Out

Of which I can only say, good.

Last year, the mayor of a seen-better-days steel town in Western Pennsylvania became the poster child of President Donald Trump’s appeal to white working-class Democrats. But he’ll soon be out of work after a 26-year-old assistant band director at the local high school beat him in a Democratic primary.

Monessen Mayor Louis Mavrakis’ outspoken support for Trump turned him into a media sensation. The 79-year-old former union organizer helped decode Trump’s appeal in the Rust Belt on Sunday political talk shows and for major newspapers, where he was quoted saying things like: “If ISIS was to come to Monessen, they’d keep on going. They’d say someone already bombed the goddamn place.”

Trump himself made a high-profile visit to Monessen, a town of just 7,500, on Mavrakis’ invitation. Trump stood in front of a wall of recycled trash to slam free-trade policies and promised to bring back good-paying coal mining and steel-making jobs.

But Mavrakis’ coup in getting Trump to town also helped lead to his downfall.

When a group of residents protested his visit, they were led by Matt Shorraw, a local community activist whose family has been in the town for generations.

“What bothered me the most was Trump’s visit got our mayor a lot of press, but he basically used that press to say our city is a dump,” Shorraw told NBC News.

Shorraw resolved to run for mayor, even though he had never held public office and was only in his mid-20s.

On Tuesday, he narrowly defeated Mavrakis in the Democratic primary. And with no Republican on the ballot in November, Shorraw is all but guaranteed to be the youngest mayor in the town’s history.

Pack your bags, Trump backers.

If You Attend the 16th Century Society Conference…

Come along and hear my paper titled Huldrych Zwingli: His Path to Reformation

Martin Luther is generally seen to be the ‘inventor’ of the Reformation. In this paper I will suggest that Zwingli actually turned, slowly at first and then more rapidly, to Reform beginning in 1515, before anyone had heard the name of Luther. Evidence will be presented from Zwingli’s own writings and from secondary literature to make the case that Zwingli was not dependent on Luther but rather well on his way to being the first Reformer of Switzerland before Luther awakened to the Gospel.

It’s only 20 minutes of your life.  You spend more time than that picking lice off of your nephew’s school sweater.  And no, there will be no powerpoint or other electric distractions.  Just pure unadulterated joyful me.

Reaping What’s Sown

A South African big game hunter died after being crushed by an elephant cow that had been shot on a game reserve in Zimbabwe at the weekend. Theunis Botha, 51, was leading a hunt with clients when the group accidentally walked into the middle of a breeding herd of elephants at the Good Luck Farm near Hwange National Park late on Friday afternoon, Zimparks spokesman Mr Simukai Nyasha said.

Three of the elephant cows charged the hunters. Mr Botha fired a shot from his rifle but he was caught by surprise by a fourth cow that stormed them from the side, the Afrikaans news site Netwerk24 reported. One of the hunters shot the elephant after she lifted Botha with her trunk.The elephant then collapsed on top of Mr Botha, who has five children with his wife Carike Botha.

Mr Botha was a highly regarded houndsman and frequently led leopard and lion hunting safaris with his pack of dogs. The website of his company Game Hounds Safaris says he pioneered traditional European-style “Monteria hunts” in southern Africa. In Monteira hunts large packs of dogs are used to drive deer and boar towards hunters who then open fire on the animals.

Killing for the sake of killing…

Today With Zwingli: Die erste kurze Antwort über Ecks sieben Schlußreden

Huldrych Zwingli published his little 19 page Flugschrift Die erste kurze Antwort über Ecks sieben Schlußreden on 21 May, 1526.  Zwingli also addressed it to the Confederation (so that all the Cantons which had embraced Reform would know how Eck should be answered by their own Pastors and Theologians).

The occasion was, of course, the Baden Disputation (which Zwingli had not been allowed to attend- the Zurich City Council deeming him too valuable to risk having him killed by the angry Catholics- a thing that certainly would have happened had he gone).

It commences

Frommen, vesten, fürsichtigen, ersamen, wysen, gnädigen, lieben herren! Sidmal mir üwer wyßheit uß ursachen, die sy wol weyßt, ze lieb den ungemeinen platz Baden nit endren wil und aber daby Egg unnd Faber mit aller irer practick, red und anheften der artiklen allein uff mich reichend, sam die disputation allein sye umb minetwillen angesehen (darumb ich vermeindt allerbillichost gewäsen wär, daß man ein gemeinen platz angesehen hett, vorus so man vor jaren offenlich verstanden hat, daß mir Baden gheinswegs gemein ist; darus ich ermessen mag, das ir fürnemen und höchste begird ist, nit mit mir, sunder hinder mir ze disputieren und da uff beschlüß ze tringen, die sy, wo mir der platz gemein wer, nit vertruwtind fürzebringen, wiewol ouch hierinn gott wirt ynsehen thuon), hierumb ist an üch, mine gnädige herren, min demuotig pitt, ir wellind mir des Eggen gründ, die er über die siben schlußreden anzeigen wirt, schrifftlich lassen zuokomen; wil ich imm in gar kurtzer zyt allweg by üch schriftlich antwurt geben.

It then lists Eck’s theses upon which Zwingli comments one by one.  To my knowledge the present little treatise has never been translated.  A pity, really, and yet more evidence that folk interested in the period need to learn German or suffer the sorrow of never really knowing what went on.

The Opening of the Baden Disputation

The disputation was opened in the Catholic city of Baden, in Aargau, May 21, 1526, and lasted eighteen days, till the 8th of June. The cantons and four bishops sent deputies, and many foreign divines were present. The Protestants were a mere handful, and despised as “a beggarly, miserable rabble.” Zwingli, who foresaw the political aim and result of the disputation, was prevented by the Council of Zurich from leaving home, because his life was threatened; but he influenced the proceedings by daily correspondence and secret messengers. No one could doubt his courage, which he showed more than once in the face of greater danger, as when he went to Marburg through hostile territory, and to the battlefield at Cappel. But several of his friends were sadly disappointed at his absence. He would have equalled Eck in debate and excelled him in biblical learning. Erasmus was invited, but politely declined on account of sickness.

The arrangements for the disputation and the local sympathies were in favor of the papal party. Mass was said every morning at five, and a sermon preached; the pomp of ritualism was displayed in solemn processions. The presiding officers and leading secretaries were Romanists; nobody besides them was permitted to take notes. The disputation turned on the real presence, the sacrifice of the mass, the invocation of the Virgin Mary and of saints, on images, purgatory, and original sin. Dr. Eck was the champion of the Roman faith, and behaved with the same polemical dexterity and overbearing and insolent manner as at Leipzig: robed in damask and silk, decorated with a golden ring, chain and cross; surrounded by patristic and scholastic folios, abounding in quotations and arguments, treating his opponents with proud contempt, and silencing them with his stentorian voice and final appeals to the authority of Rome. Occasionally he uttered an oath, “Potz Marter.” A contemporary poet, Nicolas Manuel, thus described his conduct:—

“Eck stamps with his feet, and claps his hands,
He raves, he swears, he scolds;
‘I do,’ cries he, ‘what the Pope commands,
And teach whatever he holds.’ ”

Schaff continues a brilliant description which is very much worth reading.