Daily Archives: 3 Apr 2017

The New ‘Retro’ Version of Logos!

Capitalizing on the “vintage” and “retro” craze, Faithlife Corporation released for purchase the new Retro Collector’s Edition of its popular Bible software Logos 7, which ships on a set of over 14,000 3.5″ IBM floppy disks, sources confirmed Monday.

Lucky owners of the limited edition release of Logos 7 will begin installation by inserting the disk numbered “1 of 14,285″ into their 3.5” floppy disk drive. The program’s installation wizard will then copy over approximately 1.44 megabytes of the software before prompting users to eject the disk and insert the next one, until all twenty gigabytes of the Collector’s Edition of the Bible software have been transferred over to their computer, according to the product’s description on the Logos website.

“This is for those who want a more authentic, genuine Logos experience,” a Logos representative told reporters Monday. “Getting software via digital download can just feel so cold and corporate, you know?”

According to Faithlife, the special retro edition of its Bible program will be available at the special price of $139,999.99 for a limited time only.

Great news!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Call For Papers Reminder

REMINDER:

The deadline for submission for papers and full panels for the 2017 SCSC annual meeting in Milwaukee is 15 APRIL 2017.

Abstracts (up to 250 words in length) for individual presentations and complete panels must be submitted online at: http://www.sixteenthcentury.org

Within four weeks after the April 15 deadline, the Program Committee will notify all those who submitted proposals. The conference will once again host poster sessions. Poster proposals should be submitted as “papers” to the digital history track. Please email: conference@sixteenthcentury.org for a poster session code BEFORE submitting poster proposals.

In addition to standard panels, the organizing committee will be accepting proposals for four types of alternate panels:

  • Workshop Option A: Discussion of pre-circulated papers in a workshop format (limit of 4 participants).
  • Workshop Option B: Analysis of thorny translation/paleography questions; pre-circulation not required (limit of 3 participants).
  • Workshop Option C: Examination of a big issue or question with brief comments from presenters and lively audience participation (similar to roundtables with more audience participation; limit of 4 participants).
  • Roundtables sponsored by affiliated societies.

Questions about formats should be directed to: conference@sixteenthcentury.org

Tyndale Announces the ‘Africa Study Bible’

FYI-

The Bee Stings The Besmattered By Ink Hipster ‘Pastors’

An ecumenical gathering of Christian leaders issued an amendment to the biblical canon Monday, clarifying that getting a tattoo in the Hebrew language is in fact a prerequisite for becoming a leader in the local church.

The statement officially changes 1 Timothy 3 to read, “Therefore an overseer must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, sober-minded, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not a drunkard, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money, and inked with a dope Hebrew tat.” Similar tweaks were made to the list in Titus 1, according to the council of Protestant authorities.

“Getting a lit tattoo in one of the biblical languages is obviously in keeping with the spirit of Paul’s other requirements for elders and leaders in the church as laid out in the pastoral epistles,” one commentator at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary said. “We would definitely recommend inking yourself a word written in Hebrew if you truly desire to become a teacher in the church—maybe even get a cool tribal design that melts away into a word like ‘shalom.’ That would be totally fire.”

Sources also confirmed that the chosen Hebrew word doesn’t have to be theologically significant, so long as it “looks really cool and authentic.”

That’s about how foolish they look too.

I Had Planned on Being In Atlanta for the McDonald Lecture…

But life intervened.  Alas.  Perhaps next year.

Today In Luther’s Life

April 3, 1507: Martin Luther was ordained as a priest in the Catholic Church in Erfurt, Germany. Martin entered the monastery, as many others had to find a way to make atonement for his sins before God. In the monastery, he became a student of the Bible where he ultimately found what he was looking for. His study and his speaking out on what he learned would affect not only his own life but the history of the entire world. Tomorrow we will start to see what affect this had on the life of a nun named Katharina von Bora.

Pictured is the Cathedral Church in Erfurt.

-Rebecca DeGarmeaux for Katie Luther

Unpleasant Weather

Today promises to be a weather disturbed day.   Ugh.