Coming Soon…

A load of Zwingli posts for the anniversary of his birth (1 Jan 1484) and his assumption of the office of Chief Pastor at the Great Minster in Zurich (1 Jan 1519).  Look for them at the beginning of the New Year and throughout the 1st.

Strange Things on a Plane

The elderly lady sitting next to me wasn’t a talker.  She was a reader.  And a monster.  Why?  Because as she read her book she tore out the chapters as she finished them and threw them in a little pile of trash the flight attendant made rounds to collect.

What kind of monster destroys a book by ripping out one chapter after another?

Remembering Emil Egli

egli2Emil Egli was a brilliant historian and though his name is nearly forgotten in all but the dustiest corners of academia, he was a giant in the field of Reformation studies. Born on the 9th of December, 1848, he died on the 31st of December, 1908.  Egli

… was a Swiss church historian. He studied theology, was ordained in 1870, and served in several villages of the canton of Zürich. In his student days he was deeply interested in historical studies. In 1873 appeared his important work, Die Schlacht bei Cappell 1531; in 1879, Die Züricher Wiedertäufer zur Reformationszeit, a brief product of his Aktensammlung zur Geschichte der Züricher Reformation in den Jahren 1519-1532, which he published (1879) with the support of Zürich and offers an uncommonly rich source on the early history of the Anabaptist movement. In 1887 followed a smaller volume, Die St. Galler Täufer.

And

Egli occupied himself principally with the Reformation in Switzerland. In 1879 he began his work at the university of Zürich as lecturer in church history, and in 1892 he was made a full professor. In addition to a series of shorter works he published Heinrich Bullingers Diarium des Jahres 1504-1574in the second volume of the Quellen zur schweizerischen Reformationsgeschichte, which he founded. After 1897 he published a semiannual periodical, Zwingliana, and after 1899 two volumes of Analecta Reformatorica (documents and treatises on the history of Zwingli and his times; also biographies of Bibliander, Ceporin, Johannes Bullinger). In 1902 he provided for a new edition of the Kessler’s Sabbata (a publication of the historical association of St. Gall). With G. Finsler (Basel) he began the publication of the new edition of Zwingli’s works (Zwingli’s Werke, Leipzig, 1905 ff., in Corpus Reformatorum).

He was astonishing.  He is remembered.

Off to the Winter Meeting of the Society for Old Testament Study

SOTS is my favorite conference of all the conferences.  It’s collegial.  Participants are excellently qualified and exceptionally informed.  The meeting venue is always wonderful.  And the papers are always provocative.  Plus, it’s in Britain so it’s always nice to be back there.

This year we meet in Nottingham, so I get to hang out in the best part of the country.  This year also marks the 100th Anniversary of the Society so that makes it special too.

Every member of the society meets certain qualifications, must be sponsored for membership by two full members in good standing, and have expertise in Hebrew, all of which means that it’s a dilettante free zone!!! 

Everyone you can think of who works in Hebrew Bible in the UK is involved.  So it’s just the best.  

I’ll be posting photos and paper summaries throughout, so stay tuned.