You Can Still Enter to Win

This fantastic video produced by the Christian History Institute can be yours if you’re the lucky winner.  To win, you simply need to enter by

  1. ThisChangedEverything_Rev.inddSharing this post on your twitter feed, Facebook page, or blog (and you have to let me know you have done so). The more places you share it, the better your chances of winning.
  2. Writing, in comments below, a paragraph expressing your appreciation for either Huldrych Zwingli, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Peter Martyr Vermigli, Philipp Melanchthon, Johannes Oecolampadius, or Theodore Beza.

That’s it.  The best essay in combination with the most shares will decide the winner.  Contest ends on 30 September.  Tell your friends.  Let the games begin!

About the film-

2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Protestant Reformation. On October 31, 1517, an obscure German monk named Martin Luther published 95 theses for debate in Wittenberg, Germany. Little did he know that this act would ignite a revolution that would reshape the Christian church and change Western civilization forever.

In anticipation of this important anniversary, Christian History Institute is producing a groundbreaking three-hour documentary series called This Changed Everything. Narrated by the renowned British actor David Suchet, the program tells the dynamic story of the people, places, and events that shaped the Reformation. It features expert commentary from Dr. Michael Horton, Dr. Frank James, Shane ClaiborneBishop Robert Barron, and over twenty other scholars and clergy who bring new insight into how the church came to be where it is today and where it may go in the future.

This Changed Everything celebrates the fruits of the Reformation while grappling with difficult questions about the legacy of division. Clearly, the medieval church was in dire need of reform, but could complete schism have been avoided? Why does the Protestant movement continue to splinter into ever increasing factions? How should we think about our divisions in light of Jesus’ passionate prayer that his followers be “one”?