Power of the Palindrome: Writing, Reading, and Wordplay (Part II)

Neat stuff from Sarah-

History From Below

I first began writing about palindromes when blogging for PhDiva, a superb blog run by classicist and archaeologist Dorothy King [Post HERE]. I will always be grateful to Dorothy for encouraging me to begin blogging, and just as I have continued to write, I have continued to be interested in palindromes, acrostics, and the use of writing for play.

The Sator Square from Dura Europos (c. 165-256 CE) is now at the Yale University Art Gallery. Photo is in the Public Domain. The Sator Square from Dura Europos (c. 165-256 CE) is now at the Yale University Art Gallery. Photo is in the Public Domain.

As I was going through the Yale art collection from Dura-Europos this morning, I came across an incredibly popular ancient acrostic-palindrome called the ‘Sator Square.’ I will come back to the meaning of this puzzle in just a moment, but first, let’s explore the terms. The term “acrostic” has Greek origins. It is a combination of  ἄκρος (the most extreme point) and στίχος (line or row)…

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