Quote of the Day

zw934Hierumb, gnädige wyse herren, wellend mich umb gotzwillen vor gantzer gemeind verantwurt haben und, hatt es fuog, ouch disen brief vor gantzer gemeind vorlesen lassen; dann ich by gott, der üns alle erlöst hatt, sag, das ir mir uss miner sorg und angst in disen gevarlichen zyten nimmer kumend; und wo ich úch für andre yenen gedienen könd, wölt ich mich nit sparen. – Huldrych Zwingli (Z VIII, 523-524)

If You Love Soccer and Live Anywhere Near Penn State… Or Anywhere in the Universe, This Announcement is for You

Via Christian Brady on the twitter-

Children aged 6-12 are invited to join Penn State’s Men’s and Women’s soccer teams and coaches for a special clinic to honor Mack Brady. The event is free but donations are encouraged and will support the Mack Brady Memorial Soccer Scholarship which will benefit a Penn State Men’s soccer player.   Memorial gifts may be made online at http://givenow.psu.edu or by sending a check, payable to Penn State with “In memory of Mack Brady” in the memo line, to: Penn State University, One Old Main, University Park, PA 16802.

Parents are required to stay on premises during Session and have a completed Registration form (Click here ) upon arrival. 

Please, dear friends, do what you can.

Being ‘Spiritual’ But not ‘Religious’ Can Lead to Mental Illness

Can being spiritual but not religious lead to mental health issues? The answer is yes, according to a recent study.

The study, published in the January edition of the British Journal of Psychiatry, says spiritual but not religious people, as opposed to people who are religious, agnostic or atheist, were more likely to develop a “mental disorder,” “be dependent on drugs” and “have abnormal eating attitudes,” like bulimia and anorexia.

“People who have spiritual beliefs outside of the context of any organized religion are more likely to suffer from these maladies,” said Michael King, a professor at University College London and the head researcher on the project.

Thirty percent of respondents who identified as spiritual said they had used drugs, a number that was nearly twice as much as the 16% of religious respondents who said they had used drugs, according to the study. Among the spiritual respondents, 5% said they were dependent on drugs, while 2% of religious respondents identified as dependent.

Interesting stuff in the rest of it too.  So much for the half measures people take in life and the false choices they esteem.

It’s time for a visit with the Vicar, who pointed out the absurdity of ‘spiritual’ but not religious ages ago.

Fun Facts from Church History

Adrian VI., the Dutch Pope, entered on his office on the 9th of January, 1522, just as Reform in Zurich was getting up to speed.

adrian-vi-1-sizedKnown to him was the independent stand taken by Zurich, [so] he wrote to the Zurich authorities a pleasant letter, in which he expressed no blame, but on the contrary promised to pay the debt the papal treasury owed Zurich, when in funds [i.e., when it had the money to do so]. Well were it if it had been, for the money was not forthcoming, and the fact embittered the people against the papacy.*

It’s difficult not to wonder what would have happened had Zurich been paid the money it was owed by Rome. Would the Reformation had some of the wind taken out of its sails by virtue of Rome’s financial consideration? Money has a strange way of forming opinion. But we shall, I suppose, never know.

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*S.M. Jackson, Huldreich Zwingli: The Reformer of German Switzerland (1484–1531), pp. 174-175.

On The Anniversary of Emil Egli’s Birth

I bet you’ve never heard of him, but Emil Egli was a brilliant historian.  Born on the 9th of December, 1848, he

was a Swiss church historian. He studied theology, was ordained in 1870, and served in several villages of the canton of Zürich. In his student days he was deeply interested in historical studies. In 1873 appeared his important work, Die Schlacht bei Cappell 1531; in 1879, Die Züricher Wiedertäufer zur Reformationszeit, a brief product of his Aktensammlung zur Geschichte der Züricher Reformation in den Jahren 1519-1532, which he published (1879) with the support of Zürich and offers an uncommonly rich source on the early history of the Anabaptist movement. In 1887 followed a smaller volume, Die St. Galler Täufer.

And

Egli occupied himself principally with the Reformation in Switzerland. In 1879 he began his work at the university of Zürich as lecturer in church history, and in 1892 he was made a full professor. In addition to a series of shorter works he published Heinrich Bullingers Diarium des Jahres 1504-1574 in the second volume of the Quellen zur schweizerischen Reformationsgeschichte, which he founded. After 1897 he published a semiannual periodical, Zwingliana, and after 1899 two volumes of Analecta Reformatorica (documents and treatises on the history of Zwingli and his times; also biographies of Bibliander, Ceporin, Johannes Bullinger). In 1902 he provided for a new edition of the Kessler’s Sabbata (a publication of the historical association of St. Gall). With G. Finsler (Basel) he began the publication of the new edition of Zwingli’s works (Zwingli’s Werke, Leipzig, 1905 ff., in Corpus Reformatorum).

He was astonishing.  He is remembered.

Amos Kloner’s Essay on Talpiot

Prof. Kloner has kindly sent along his 27 page report published by Bar Ilan University on the Talpiot tomb for which I thank him.  It’s in Hebrew but for non readers it also includes an English abstract-

Burial Cave 1050 in East Talpiot, Jerusalem
Amos Kloner and Boaz Zissu

The East Talpiot burial cave was uncovered at a construction site and examined relatively quickly, within a short and clearly insufficient time, on 16 April 1981, as part of excavation permit no. 1050. The archaeological team found that the cave comprised of nine kokhim which contained primary burials (or inhumations – the skeletons lied supine) and eight ossuaries, inserted in antiquity into four of the kokhim. The kokhim which contained the ossuaries also contained some scattered bones of earlier burials. It was clear that the bone collection was not done properly and later generations did not take great care with their predecessors’ remains. The cave belonged to a Jerusalemite family during the second half of the first century BCE and the first century CE.

The cave contained the burials of at least 21 individuals of different ages and it can be assumed that the total number reached up to 26 individuals. The human remains were badly damaged by the ultraorthodox and by the construction workers, and when the ossuaries were finally inserted back into the kokhim on top of the inhumations, they were placed without knowledge of their original locations.

In the opinion of the present authors, all of the hypotheses and proposals that were made recently, connecting the cave findings to early Christians, to Joseph of Arimathea, to Christian apostles, or to a community of Jewish-Christians – are unsubstantiated.