Fun Facts From Church History: The Establishment of the First Reformed University

Zwingli showed his ambition for an educated clergy by establishing a theological seminary as soon as funds were available, which was in the summer of 1525. A call was given to a teacher of Greek and Hebrew, and Zwingli himself took part in the work. The text-book was the Bible. Instruction began at eight o’clock in the morning. One teacher read the Hebrew text and translated it into Latin with a brief interpretation. Then Zwingli translated the same text from the Greek of the Septuagint into Latin. Leo Jud then commented in German upon what had been read, and explained in Latin. This theological seminary was attended not only by regular students but by the clergy of the city, and Leo Jud’s lectures by the people generally. Instruction from the Greek New Testament was given in the afternoon at three o’clock by Myconius. That Zwingli set up for himself a high standard is shown by his writings, and he was able to impress this standard upon others. He called his institute “The Prophecy.”

Excerpted from S. Jackson.

Thankfully the Reformed vision of an educated and literate clergy seen first by Zwingli has been adopted by most descendents of the Reformation (except in pockets where the folly and lunacy of anti-intellectual anti-educational still exist).

2 thoughts on “Fun Facts From Church History: The Establishment of the First Reformed University

  1. Jona Lendering 7 Aug 2012 at 8:14 pm

    Isn’t this more or less a copy of the Louvain Collegium Trilingue?

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    • Jim 7 Aug 2012 at 8:18 pm

      not for the reformed!

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