Zwinglius Redivivus

Archive for the ‘Archaeology’ Category

The Albright Institute is on the Twitter

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Written by Jim

October 28, 2014 at 07:57

Posted in Archaeology

ASOR Invites You …

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Written by Jim

October 27, 2014 at 06:23

Posted in Archaeology

Live Streaming the Magdala Conference

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Via Joseph Lauer-

A week ago information was circulated about Nyack College’s hosting today, Monday, October. 20, 2014, in partnership with the Center for the Study of Ancient Judaism and Christian Origins, a gathering of scholars and dignitaries from 4:00–7:30 pm at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Manhattan, focused on discoveries from the excavations at Magdala. See http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/278338391.html and https://www.facebook.com/events/850022248363473/

Jeffrey P. García, Lecturer in Bible at Nyack College, jeffrey.garcia@nyack.edu, has kindly notified us that the conference will be live-streamed. So, if you can’t attend in person, tune in at http://www.nyack.edu/magdala or http://www.nyack.edu/content/Magdala and enjoy.

Written by Jim

October 20, 2014 at 12:00

Posted in Archaeology

New From Ido Koch: Goose Keeping, Elite Emulation and Egyptianized Feasting at Late Bronze Lachish

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“Goose Keeping, Elite Emulation and Egyptianized Feasting at Late Bronze Lachish”, just published in Tel Aviv 41/2 (2014), pp. 161–179.

The paper examines an assemblage of goose (Anser sp.) bones found in Late Bronze levels at Lachish and discusses its historical and cultural context. The appearance of an Egyptian trait—the keeping and consumption of waterfowl—is not surprising at Lachish, where a vast amount of Aegyptiaca was unearthed. The assemblage is interpreted not according to the common assumption regarding an Egyptian presence at Lachish but rather as attesting to the local elite that was influenced by the long-term Egyptian hegemony over Canaan. Based on contemporaneous comparanda, the author argues that this local elite adopted the Egyptian trait of goose keeping and adapted it to its own needs of communal feasting—and thus presented themselves as Egyptian.

geese

You’ll wish to get hold of a copy for your edification and instruction.

Written by Jim

October 20, 2014 at 10:04

Posted in Archaeology

The Newly Discovered Documents of the Judean Exiles in Babylonia

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UPDATE:  I’ve received notification that the lecture has been canceled.
Time:  10/21/14 – 12:30 PM to 2:30 PM  – Location:  3105 Susquehanna Hall

Within the last few years, 200 cuneiform tablets have been unearthed that concern the exiled Judean community in Babylonia from the reign of the Babylonian king, Nebuchadnezzar to that of the Persian monarch, Darius I. This coming year, the contents of these documents will be made available to the public for the first time.

These texts come from the two main towns, previously unknown, of the exiled Judeans, Al-Yahuda and Bit-Nashar, and describe the economic life of their inhabitants. This talk will provide the background to better appreciate the significance of these documents and will highlight their most important aspects, including new insights into the pronunciation of their god YHWH.

That sounds fascinating.  Does anyone know anything further of these texts and are there any photos?

Written by Jim

October 17, 2014 at 14:23

Posted in Archaeology

Help Fund the Dig at Kabri

Eric Cline has put together a Go Fund page- here- and he writes

Help us dig at Tel Kabri this coming summer! When else will you have the opportunity to help support the excavation of a Canaanite palace more than 3,500 years old, decorated with Minoan-style floor and wall paintings, and with the oldest and largest wine cellar yet found from the ancient Near East?

If you have the inclination and the disposable income (and surely you have a bit), then do consider taking part in this project.

Written by Jim

October 16, 2014 at 07:44

Posted in Archaeology

The Temple of Baal at Tel Burna

baal_temple_burnaWhile archaeologists have not fully excavated the cult complex, they can tell it was quite large, as the courtyard alone was 52 by 52 feet (16 by 16 meters). Inside the complex, researchers discovered three connected cups, fragments of facemasks, massive jars that are almost as big as a person and burnt animal bones that may indicate sacrificial rituals.

The archaeologists said they aren’t sure who was worshipped at the complex, though Baal, the Canaanite storm god, is a possibility. “The letters of Ugarit [an ancient site in modern-day Syria] suggest that of the Canaanite pantheon, Baal,the Canaanite storm god, would have been the most likely candidate,” Itzhaq Shai, a professor at Ariel University who is directing a research project at Tel Burna.

And more, from Antonio Lombatti.

Written by Jim

October 14, 2014 at 13:54

Posted in Archaeology

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